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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI,
Newbie second year rider. Problems with my bike and your help is greatly appreciated. Last year starting the bike was becoming more and more difficult with electric start button setting the ignition in progress. She sat all winter and I was told to change my Solenoid in the mean time. Never changed it but this spring she turned over three times then nothing again from button. Changed the solenoid but now get nothing when turning on key ignition, no headlight or fan as per usual? At least with old solenoid that took place. Not sure what I did but does this sound familar to anyone? My battery is good and checks out at 12+ volts at solenoid. What is the wishbone fuse? Is that the 30 amp blade fuse(?) on the solenoid? or is this another fuse?
Thanks for your help, learning is fun but learning electronics of vehicles was never easy for me. Thanks guys, ride safe the weather is right now in WI finally.
Greg
 

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What kind of solenoid did you use?
The stock solenoid has the main 30amp fuse incorporated into it.
Make sure you have a main fuse, and everything is reconnected.
 

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A battery can show 12 volts, and still be dead. When a battery shows 12 volts and is no good, the voltage will drop substantially when a load is placed on it. What you're calling a solenoid I call a relay, if it is the part on the right side of the battery that the positive battery cable connects to. It is a high capacity electrically operated switch, which is used between the starter button and the starter, because the starter button and wiring are way to small to carry enough current to operate the starter. There are two large cables connected to the relay. One is the positive battery cable, the other is the power cable directly to the starter. Take a screwdriver, and connect these 2 terminals. That bypasses everything, and sends power directly from the battery to the starter. If the battery, starter, cables, and all the connections are good, the starter will turn over. Before doing this, make sure the bike is on the centerstand, or is in neutral. See what happens and go from there.


If your battery has been sitting for a long time without being charged, it is likely bad. That will kill even a brand new battery. A lot of people who have to store their bikes during the winter wind up buying a new battery every year, because they didn't keep it charged during the winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi thanks thus far but still no go. I have more clues. Your right the existing and new solenoids each have a 30 amp blade type fuse along with 4 male blade terminals. I have three wires to attach to the blades does it matter where each one goes? Is there a diagram?
Next I took the seat off to follow some wire harness' and upon doing so I found a yellow maybe 14 ga wire with 10 amp blade fuse attached to lead on an open loop end connector?? Make sense of that? THis was loose under the seat??? Looks like the wire would tap onto battery terminal and in following travels up towards main fuse block but detours just prior to a block of somekind.
Also in looking into the fuses on the main fuse block near gas tank fill, I found one of the feeding two wires to the block off. I have no idea how this could have happend other than me knocking it off. I re fastened onto block but still nothing.

I direct powered starter from battery and she cranks. Still no clue on what to do and why no overall ignition power anylonger? Keep thinking fellas please.
Greg
 

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So the starter cranks if you connect power directly to it, but doesn't if you jumper the terminals of the relay? That would seem to be impossible, unless you have a bad connection at one end of the positive battery cable, either at the battery or relay.

Unfortunately the starter circuit is a bit complex, and can require a bit of tracing. There has to be power going TO the starter button, the button has to be good, power must come out when it is pressed, and there should be power at the positive side of the relay coil when the button is pressed. That is what triggers the relay and sends power to the starter. Unless it has been disconnected and jumpered, there is also a clutch safety switch which prevents the engine from starting if the bike is in gear and the clutch is out. You need to find out if you are getting voltage to the electromagnetic coil on the relay when the ignition switch in on, and you push the button. If you are, the relay is bad. If you aren't you will need to backtrack back to the pushbutton. This is all just for the starter. Voltage for the ignition system which fires the plugs is routed through the main ignition switch. The ignition switch is complicated, and does several things at once. I would track down the starter issue first.

As for what may look like strange wiring/connectors/fuses, it may be something done by a previous owner, who may have installed any number of accessories on the bike, even if they are no longer there, or it may be normal. Goldwings were made with many different options, and rather than make a separate wire harness for each one, sometimes they modified a harness or left unused connectors. I have found the wiring schematics in my Clymer manual to be incorrect on a couple of occasions. I spent nearly a week looking for why I had no spark, and finally found a broken connection INSIDE the factory wiring harness that the schematic did not even show.


Rather than looking at things that don't seem right, systematically track things down, from one end to the other until you find the problem. You will need a decent multimeter, and maybe some pieces of wire to use as jumpers.

I just reread your original post. So the bike has started before with the starter button. Replacing the relay has nothing to do with whether the headlight comes on or not, it is strictly part of the starter circuit. Did whoever told you to replace it give you a reason?

First make sure you have all the wires connected to the relay. There should be a larger red and red/white wires, and smaller yellow/red and green/red wires connected to the plug on top of the relay, then there should be the main battery cable connected down lower to the big terminal. There should be a dogbone fuse which is part of the relay assembly. Then there should also be ANOTHER dogbone fuse (both 30A) in a SEPARATE red wire coming from the positive battery terminal. The main big red cable is for the starter only, the smaller red wire powers everything else. Make sure BOTH fuses are good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Replaced solenoid originally cause bike was no longer starting or doing anything when starter button was pushed. intermittent problems prior to it failing altogether.
That is why it was changed.
Even when bike would not crank when button was pushed the fan and headlight would run. Now that is not even taking place?

I did not try to jump terminals on solenoid to get bike to crank for fear of the arcing burning something up. I simply touched starter lead to battery and she ran.

So the question I was looking to find is the location of those three wires on the solenoid as to their positioning? Does it matter? I see no way to ID their locations.
Thanks for hanging in there with me.
Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I only have one larger red wire with a spade Female end on it for the solenoid, no red/white. Do have the other two smaller Red/green and yellow/red leads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not finding this second red wire from battery with 30 amp fuse? Only found the loose yellow wire with a loop connector on it and an in line 10 amp fuse
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
just put everything back together and jumped the two terminals on Solenoid and it turned over. Still nothing at the key switch though?
Do we know what that yellow wire I found under the seat is with the inline 10 amp fuse is? I did not connect this one anywhere at present. still did not find a red/white wire with a fuse though. looked.

How can I get back to where I was with the engine simply not turning over? Why did I lose the fan and dash lights with the key switch? I do have a meter so I can check things as directed. Thanks for your patience with my problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Found a diagram for wiring the three spade ended wires on top of the solenoid but get nothing.
Checked starter button but did not find it gunked up. I am stumped.
Thanks for your continued assistance.
Greg
 

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when you press the start button you should see 12v applied to the solenoid,if not check fuse #4 which is the far right side of the fusebox opposite the accessory terminals
 

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How many cables are attached to the positive battery post? Mine has two, one big one directly to the solenoid/relay, and a smaller red one which goes into the wiring harness. The solenoid/relay has a 30 amp dogbone fuse in it, and the other wire also has one, in a small black rectangular holder, a few inches from the battery. I believe that wire is what powers the lights. It would be easy to blow the fuse just by working on it. Fuses DO wear out, just like light bulbs. Over several decades they get weaker and weaker. A vibration or a second of slightly high resistance would do it.

It just occurred to me that mine may have some differences being an LTD with fuel injection. I'll look at the manual and see what it shows for yours.
 

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Greg, Here's a pic of the starter selinoid on my bike. The 2 wires in the back of the connector are the hot and ground wires that energise the selinoid. The 2 in the front that are cut are the red, red/white wires that come from the regulator. You should be able to use a test light to see if you're getting voltage to the selinoid. If you do have voltage and it won't start, check the ground..

Another thing you can do is put a multimeter across the battery. With the key off you should read 12.3vdc or so. When you turn the key on the voltage should drop to about 10.9vdc because it's just energised the ignition circuit. This should tell you if you've got a problem with the ignition switch....

BTW, You have a PM....
 

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Greg, Here's a pic of the starter selinoid on my bike. The 2 wires in the back of the connector are the hot and ground wires that energise the selinoid. The 2 in the front that are cut are the red, red/white wires that come from the regulator. You should be able to use a test light to see if you're getting voltage to the selinoid. If you do have voltage and it won't start, check the ground..

Another thing you can do is put a multimeter across the battery. With the key off you should read 12.3vdc or so. When you turn the key on the voltage should drop to about 10.9vdc because it's just energised the ignition circuit. This should tell you if you've got a problem with the ignition switch....

BTW, You have a PM....
Why are the wires from the regulator cut? Do you a different setup from stock?
 

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Take a look at what's in my fingers. That's a 30amp inline fuse holder that I soldered in to replace the OEM Dogbone fuse. I did the same with the 30amp submain inline dogbone fuse located behind the starter selinoid... That's ONLY on the Fuelies though....
 

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Why are the wires from the regulator cut? Do you a different setup from stock?
It's the same as stock.
The red/white wires from the regulator are joined with the red battery feed at the starter relay by the original design. He's just made the connection before the relay, as he should when wiring in a new fuse holder(s).
I thought you rewired your bike.
 

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I rewired the stator and regulator, but so far I have only replaced one of the dogbone fuses by the relay (the one in the second red wire, in a separate holder) with a blade type holder and fuse. The dog bone is still in the relay. I have several more. It has yet to fail, and the relay has never failed to work.
 
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