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Hey guys

Iknow this has come up before and I went to the archives to find a solution but no luck... so my problem is I have a fried connector at the main fuse on my 86 aspy can I bypass this or should I replace ......also I assume that it is the starter solenoid that is a part of this connection??? any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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You could clean the contacts andscrews and replace the fuse. When mine blew on my :11grey:thats what I did.

I have since replaced the fuse assembly with an automotive type blade connector. I think thats what most people who have experienced this problem have done. It will be a lot easier to replace in the future should (when) it happens again!

Bob
 

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But my problem is the whole connector has had a meltdown can i bypass or replace??????
 

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If the whole connector melted down then the fuse might have been bypassed in the first place... the fuse should have blown long before the connector melted down.

Replace the Honda fuse block with a 30-amp automotive in-line fuse holder.If you've never used a soldering iron before this is a good time to learn. Make sure the solder melts andsoaks into the wires. If you end up with round blobs of solder outside the wires and the wires are not saturated with solder, it's not a good solder joint. Cover the new solder joints with heatshrink tubing and electrical tape.

If you continue to blow the 30-amp automotive fuses, then you have a problem elsewhere like a short to ground.

If this is the case, you'll need to do some further troubleshooting to find where your electrical system is being shorted to ground. The best way to do this is to use a systematic approach.

Turn all your accesories off and turn on the ignition switch. If it doesn't blow right away, feel for any heat coming from around the fuse block by feeling the wires. There shouldn't be any heat. If you have access toan ammeter, this would be better than the "feel for heat" method.

Now turn your accessories on one by one to see if the fuse blows or any heat is generated (hopefully those accesories have their own fuses).

If this doesn't uncover anything, inspect your wiring harness. The places most prone to shorts are where the harness bends around edges, is subject to vibration, is subject to bending, or flexing. Use your hands and pull, flex and bend the harness to uncover any weak spots, and use a mirror and a flashlight to inspect where you can't see otherwise. What you're looking for is where the protective cover has chafed away, bare wires, wires shorting together etc.

If there are any wires with only their insulation protecting them that might be subject to chafing, wrap those wires with electrical tape at a minimum, best to use convoluted tubing or wire wrap. If in doubt, protect the wires.

Many electrical problems are caused by botched, amateurish accessory installation - those wires have to be protected just as well or better than what came from the facory. Every accessory must also have a fuse protecting it, if not, and there's a short to ground, it creates heat, melts insulation, and creates havoc. Fuses should be placed as close to the source of power as possible.

For this reason, check any accessory installations first since these seem to be most problematic.
 

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Thanks everyone I got just the answer I was looking for this site is the greatest!!!!!!
 
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