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Hello all, I am a new bike owner and I am looking for suggestions to help diagnose a serious problem I'm having. Thanks in advance for your time.

Recently acquired my bike, and has been running great. Last outing, the bike would just die, lost all electrical. The clock was reset to 12:00 but continue to blink.

For no apparant reason full electrical power would come back, the bike would start back up and I'm on my way --- until it happened again. The problem showed up about seven times yesterday, sometime at highway speed ( a little scarey but the bike bumped started right away), and sometimes when stopped at a light. I checked the battery terminal's and they were fine.

Any ideas?
 

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Check the 30amp master fuse on the starter relay. It is located on the right side of the battery and may be covered with a rubber boot. From what I understand the fuses can corrode to the point of being basically disintegrated after awhile. My 83 Aspencade did the same thing on the way home one day. It would die out then run ok for a bit then die again as the broken fuse pieces vibrated together then apart. Lost all elect. and everything. I had to make a jumper from a piece of wire till I got a new one. I have a spare now but I will replace the whole Assembly with an auto type fuse if/when it happens again.

P.S. You may need to look closely at the fuse. Itmay notlook blown, but it may be cracked.

Bob
 

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Thanks for the information Bob, I'll inspect the fuse tomorrow, and look at replacing the stock part with the in-line fuse solution you suggested.

Ride safe,

David
 

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I had the same experience as Bob with my '86 SEI. The fuse link pretty much corroded through. Your problem has to be near the battery as Bob suggested but you might have some other electrical problems since at highway speeds the alternator should have carried the load even if the battery dropped out. You might want to check out the stator connector, the three wire plug and socket in the line coming out of the stator at the rear left side of the engine just below the forward end of the battery with three yellow wires. A lot of older bikes have had this connector spliced out because of corrosion and heating problems in the connector. Do a search in this forum and you will find a lot of information on these type problem by several members.

:waving:
 

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David,

exavidbrought up a good point. I recently checked my stator plug connection and was surprised to find that it was very very very toasted. The plastic connector burned all the way through in a couple of places. Extremely lucky it hadn't arced through and shorted together. I strongly urge you to inspect your stator connections while you're looking at the fuse. My connector looked fine on the outside but when I got it apart it was obvious I had a big problem. There is a pick of it on a link called "Another stator story". Stator replacement requires removal of the engine and a few hundred dollars.

As for the alternator carrying the load if the fuse is broke, mine didn't. I was cruising at speed when it happened. The bike acted like someone was turning the ignition switch on and off. All the gauges (digital), lights and engine shut off and on over and over until I got stopped and found the problem.

My bike is an 83 GL1100 Aspencade with 92000 miles. I'm not sure if everything I said applies to you year, but I think so.

Bob
 

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lastcanuck, real good advise above.. I would like to add that you should look REAL CLOSELY at the double white plastic connector (with the 2 red wires) entering the starter relay just above that fuse that was mentioned in the above posts. I have found a few 1200's that had that white connector (& the actual wire connectors inside that white plastic) burnt & making partial contact.. If that white plastic connector won't easily pull out of it's receptacle or the plastic is oozing out of the bottom of the relaycavity you have a melting problem there (common problem)..

I usually just add a 30 amp sealed GM type fuse holder with a 30 amp fuse & by-pass the relay fuse & justpower the red wires directly from the battery through that added 30 amp fuse.. By using a sealed fuse holder the battery acid fumes & water intrusion won't be a future problem..



JDC
 

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all good points you can also check the ground going to frame had my old gl1000do that found a loose groung wire from the battary to the frame
 

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If you are losing all electrical power wouldn't the key switch be suspect as well? Just guessing though!
 

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mjpliv wrote:
If you are losing all electrical power wouldn't the key switch be suspect as well? Just guessing though!

Sure would Mjpliv,, that's a real good thought.. Especially the early 1200's as that was a known problem with them..



JDC
 

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All above are good places to start.mjpilv is right about the ignition switch too, my 85 had all of theseproblem. Next time it happens just wiggle the key and see if it effects it.
 

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I had an earth problem with my 1986 Aspencade last year,It turned out to be corrosion of the engine casing where the long nut and bolt goes through that has the battery earth lead connected to it, it had corroded so bad that the aluminium casting had broken into three pieces due to the white powdery corrosion expanding between the bolt shank and the bore in the casing, this had obviously been rotting for some time, a small dab of grease on the bolts would have prevented it when it was first assembled in the factory:gunhead:, this corrosion is also evident in the lower engine bolt area as this is seized solid and will require drilling out if i ever have to take the engine out,i have squirted some wd40 in the area to try and cut down the corrosion and try to loosen the bolt but to no avail and i have heated it up as well with a blowtorch you can feel the bolt twisting when you try to undo it but the thread end of the bolt is still solid:shock::phope my stator keeps on working:D.
 

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Thank you to all that responded to my call for help. The response was great.

Here is what I found,

- Stator connector had been removed and the yellow wires hardwired together.

- Ground wire tight and secure

- Fuse okay

- Heavy red wire from main fuse block charred and insulation melted.

- Bottom section of connector on top of the main fuse block appears to be cracked and deteriorated. The connector does not lock together anymore.

Here are some questions,

Wouldbypassing the existing fuse by wiring in a automotive fuse solve the issue? What about the other wires coming out of the block connector? can they be hardwired. Is the best option to replace the entire unit.

thank in advance for your help
 

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You can hardwire any connector, it just makes it a bit harder to replace whatever is on the end of the wires. In this case the choice seems to be adding an automotive fuse to replace the link and hardwiring around the damaged connector. It might be possible to find a replacement connector from a bike salvage, but I'd just do a soldered twist splice with heat shrink tubing over the splice. Heat shrink is far better than tape, it won't get gummy or sticky in heat and gas or oil won't affect it.

:waving:
 

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lastcanuck wrote:
- Heavy red wire from main fuse block charred and insulation melted.

- Bottom section of connector on top of the main fuse block appears to be cracked and deteriorated. The connector does not lock together anymore.

Here are some questions,

Wouldbypassing the existing fuse by wiring in a automotive fuse solve the issue? What about the other wires coming out of the block connector? can they be hardwired. Is the best option to replace the entire unit.
Yes, once that starter relay starts to corrode & the red wire connector starts to crumble your best bet is to by-pass the connector & relay fuse completely (see my earlier post above)..
Try to remove the red wire connector from the relay, then cut the red wires just above the white connector. If it won't easily come out just cut the wires & leave the connector in the relay pocket.. Then make sure the exposed red wires have a good clean wire area exposed (you might have to cut them back farther to find good clean non-corroded wire).. Then solder the red wires together as well as one pigtail from an automotive30 amp+ sealed fuse holder.. Then solder a ring terminal on the other pigtail of that 30 amp fuse holder & hook it to the battery's positive post using the battery cable attachment screw (I usually poke a small hole in the red battery cable rubber cover & run the fuse pigtail in through that hole so the red rubber cover can be re-installed correctly)..
On soldering those wires: just twisting those large redwires+ fuse holder wires together & soldering isn't the best of approaches, once the wires are all hooked together it is a real good idea to cut the rearfingers off of a largecrimp on wire connector & actually crimp those fingers over that wire joint, then when properly crimped, solder the entire joint to make it secure & as low of a resistance as possible (that kind of a properly crimped & soldered wire connection is actually required by the motor company I work for).. Don't forget to use a heat shrink tubing over the wire joint (heat shrink tubing with an internal glue or sealer is best)..
On those other (rear) two wires going to the starter relay? Those CAN'T be by-passed as they are the wires that excite the relay & make the starter operate.. I have found that in most cases those wires are not a problem though as they only carry current at start up so don't seem to corrode likea connector that has continuous current does.
When all done but before buttoning the job up- Fill the cavity (or remnants or the old connector) in that starter relay with silicone sealer to prevent water from entering the relay pocket & cover the exposed fuse wires & red wires with that black plastic convoluted tubing to prevent chafing & future shorts & rub through problems..
If you need a picture of a completed repair just give me an E-Mail & I will shoot a digital & E-Mail it to you..
 

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My 84 Aspencade had a similar problem and it turned out to be the ignition switch. Honda had a major recall on this years ago and maybe your's got missed. My new ignition switch cost $38.CDNand I haven't had anyfurther problems since replacing it.

Vic
 

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lastcanuck wrote:
- Heavy red wire from main fuse block charred and insulation melted.

- Bottom section of connector on top of the main fuse block appears to be cracked and deteriorated. The connector does not lock together anymore.

Here are some questions,

Wouldbypassing the existing fuse by wiring in a automotive fuse solve the issue? What about the other wires coming out of the block connector? can they be hardwired. Is the best option to replace the entire unit.
You found the problem. Yes another fuse holder will solve that problem, but now youve got to deal with more bad connections. All the connections in the chargign system are shot.

No, dont replace the whole unit, only the fuse part is bad. Ive not seen a solenoid damaged from this.
 

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Sorry, no opportunity to get pictures of the wiring. No digital camera, plus I've already repaired.

Thanks
 
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