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After replacing my head gasket and puting everything back together I noticed oil leaking really bad around the pulse generator seal. So I ordered a new seal to replace the old one. It still leaks but not as bad :X. The leak is coming from inside around the shaft. It looks like I may have to order another seal or maybe two. There doesnt seem much I can do but insert the seal by carefully taping around the edges till it is flush inside the case or tap in in with a socket of the same size. Could there be something else wrong as to way the new seal leaked or is there a trick to put in in?
 

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Yu probably just damaged the delicate lip on the new seal. Make sure the shaft is clean next time and coated in oil, also put some tape on the end as thats where the seals usualy get cut when fitting.
 

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Put a smear of grease on the lip of the next new seal, that usually stops the lip from tearing. Cleaning the shaft makes sense as well and make sure that there are no corroded bits on it that might damage the seal when sliding it on.
 

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Thanks everybody... that is one thing I did not do - clean the shaft and coat in oil. :?

...again thanks for the advise:)
 

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trapez wrote:
There doesnt seem much I can do but insert the seal by carefully taping around the edges till it is flush inside the case or tap in in with a socket of the same size.  Could there be something else wrong as to way the new seal leaked or is there a trick to put in in?
 
INstalling in that manner can cause leaks, realize the seal lip interference on the shaft is a few thousandths of an inch and driving it in crooked can ruin it instantly. A little crooked warps the metal case the seal lip is moulded onto.

At minimum, the seal should be pressed in with a socket after guranteeing its in straight with calipers (how i do it) or better yet, considering all the teardown work, have a machine shop press them in.

Yes, they must be greased or oiled, or the lip can burn when the shaft runs.
 

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Alwaysinspect the seal bearing surface before replacing seals. If you see a dark line where the seal lip bears, it should be polished out. I use 800 grit wet paper to hand polish the surface until it's shiny again. If you can't get the surface really smooth without wear marks it's often helpful to install a thin wire ring in the recess the seal fits in first and then seat the seal on top of it. Doing this will get the seal lip off the damaged or worn part of the shaft. I also pack the seal and the lip with Moly and give the shaft or whatever it has to be pressed over a coat of moly. Also tape any threaded surfaces that the seal passes over because these will cut the rubber darn near every time. As Vic says, you can find plastic pipe or socket to fit the seal to press it in. Be very careful not to get it cocked, I use a brass drift and a ball pein hammer to keep things straight if a seal does get slightly cocked, but if you let the thing get tipped very much you might as well throw it away and start with a new one. ALWAYS, ALWAYS CLEAN, POLISH AND GREASE THE SHAFT FIRST!!

:jumper:
 

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trapez wrote:
After replacing my head gasket and puting everything back together I noticed oil leaking really bad around the pulse generator seal. So I ordered a new seal to replace the old one. It still leaks but not as bad :X. The leak is coming from inside around the shaft. It looks like I may have to order another seal or maybe two. There doesnt seem much I can do but insert the seal by carefully taping around the edges till it is flush inside the case or tap in in with a socket of the same size. Could there be something else wrong as to way the new seal leaked or is there a trick to put in in?

Trapez, as mentioned above, you could easily have a wear mark or worn ring on the shaft where the seal contacts..


I run across this quite frequently on old antique engines & farm equipment.. What I usually do is take the original seal ID/OD measurements & seal thickness & call my local bearing & seal supplier.. In a lot of cases there will be a double lip seal available that not only gives two sealing areas but usually places one or both seal lips in a different location on the shaft so at least one lip is riding on a non worn area of the shaft.


If a double lip seal isn’t available, or ends up too thick to install, I try to find a seal from a different seal manufacturer, sometimes a different seal will have the seal lip in a slightly different location so will ride in a virgin place on the shaft..


Another place to look is: that the shaft isn’t loose in it’s bushing or bearing bore.. A shaft that moves around in it’s bore is almost impossible to seal correctly..

JDC
 
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