Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I have been working on my dad's 87 1200 interstate. The initial problem was fuel running out of the carbs after starting engine after sitting for two years. I removedand disassemled all four carbs and found 3 needles stuck open. My brother bought four aftermarket carb kits and I cleaned and reassembled the carbs. I set the float level at 7.5 mm as per the clymer manual. I also set the pilot screws as per the clymer manual. Isinked the carbs using a mercury manometer. Every thing seemed to be working as expected untill I went for a test ride. Itacted like it was starving for fuel. I removed the carbs again andreset the float level to 5 mm but this seemed to have no affect. I have checked the fuel pump, it checked OK. I also replaced the diaphram and spring for the secondary cutoff valve. What makes the vacuum cylinder and diaphram go up? It doesn't appear to have a hole in the carb body where the diaphram has a small hole at it's edge. In short, I'm stumped.
 

·
Guru
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
imported post

did you replace the needle valves? If you did, & they were not from mother honda, your bike will not run well. if your float levels are out by a few mm, Your bike will run rich or lean depending which way you are out of adjustment.

the ports in those carbs are extremely small & much patients must be used in the cleaning process to ensure good performance. Is there rust in the fuel tank? This will ruin all your hard work in minutes if particals get into the carbs.

Randakks makes the best carb kits besides honda. all other ones seem to have a huge failure rate with forum members. I would suggest that you treat your fuel with sea foam. once you can get it running well enough for a good ride, pour 1/2 can into a full tank & go.

Critical maintenance on a wing is timing belts. if they snap, slip etc you will get imediate internal engine damage. Your spark plug boots have resisters inside them. they will also fail in time. They unscrew from the plug wire. If you take them off, look at the plug wire where they screwed out of. if the solid core wire looks corroded, trim it back slightly to expose clean wire & replace boots.

If you get everything set right, your bike will be a stump puller & run like a smooth car with alot of torque!

Welcome to the forum, Ask lots of questions if you have any & keep us posted!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

Thanks for your response. I need all the help I can get. I now have a question about the big diaphram in the top of the carb. I have checked the diaphrams by mildly stretching these over a light and found no holes or tears. At the edge of the diaphram there is a small loop which is a molded part of the diaphram. It lays over a small depression in the body of the carb which would lead one to think there is a hole in this depression to allow vacuum to pull air out from on top of the diaphram to cause it to raise up against the spring tension thus opening the airway and raising the main needle up out of the main jet. My problem is this, I cannot see a hole in this depression for any air to pass through. I have cleaned this with an aerosol can of carb cleaner and compressed air, and have searched for an air passage with a magnifying glass. I cannot find a hole there. Can you explain in great detail how is this diaphram supposed to lift up? Am I missing somthing? I am looking to answer this issue before I pull the carbs off again to try new needles and seats again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,137 Posts
imported post

I may be wrong but I thought the diaphragm move by differential, not vacuum
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top