Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last night I stopped for gas and my 1987 Interstate failed to start for the first time ever. It went err err (turned over very slowly for 2 seconds) and then nothing. :frown2: I still had all my lights, but they are all LEDs so they don't take much juice.

The gas station attendant was kind enough to give me a running shove push start and it started right up and home I went. It was only about 2 miles from home, but it ran great on the way.

When I got home, before I shut it off I measured the voltage at the battery and the output was @ 11 volts at 3000 RPMs.
It was too late to do more because, well you know, work tomorrow.

What do you guys and/or gals think it could be? What you troubleshoot first, second, third... I'm lost and could really use your input.

Oh yeah, there are 30,184 miles on it and it has run fantastic for the 3 years I've owned it. Just changed the oil last week with GN4 10W40. Change oil and filter every year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
First thing to check is stator output. A low miles bike, likely still has the connector on the three yellow wires from the stator to the rec/reg. If there, cut it out and throw it away. If burnt, that likely is your problem already. Doesn't hurt to test the stator before you reconnect the wires.

With stator disconnected, Measure AC volts between all three stator leads, should be over 50VAC with engine @ 3000 RPM. With engine off, also measure ohms from one of the stator leads to engine block, should be NO reading (open circuit).

If the stator passes these tests your problem likely lays at the rectifier/regulator module.

Do these checks and report back.... :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,377 Posts
"Stator Test

1- First, put the bike on the centerstand. Cut the wires on both sides of the stator connector plug. Strip the insulation aprox. 1/2"-1" back on all three yellow wires. Label each wire A, B, and C.

2- With a multimeter, digital or analog, set to read resistance, check each leg to ground for short's. If no short's are found, (o resistance), you're good to go so far.

3- With the meter set to read resistance, check across each leg. A to B, B to C, then C to A. The reading's should be about 3 ohm's. If you read infinite resistance across any of the legs you have an open winding and the stator is bad. If they read good, keep going.

4- A helper is good to have for this next step. With the battery fully charged and the three yellow wire's separated so they cannot make contact, crank the bike. Have your helper rev the bike to 3000rpm after the bike warm's up.

IMPORTANT!!!

You are checking for AC voltage NOT DC voltage!! Make sure the meter is set to read a minimum of 120vac!!

With the bike at 3000rpm, check leg A to B. Note the voltage.
Then check leg B to C. Note the voltage.
Finaly check leg C to A. Note the voltage.

Compare the three readings. They should be between 50-70vac plus or minus about 5vac per leg. If they read good, chances are you've got a bad regulator."
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
First thing to check is stator output. A low miles bike, likely still has the connector on the three yellow wires from the stator to the rec/reg. If there, cut it out and throw it away. If burnt, that likely is your problem already. Doesn't hurt to test the stator before you reconnect the wires.

With stator disconnected, Measure AC volts between all three stator leads, should be over 50VAC with engine @ 3000 RPM. With engine off, also measure ohms from one of the stator leads to engine block, should be NO reading (open circuit).

If the stator passes these tests your problem likely lays at the rectifier/regulator module.

Do these checks and report back.... :)
Thank you for your quick reply Mr. Winger.

I will do these tests today and report back. But I need a bit more guidance if you have a chance. One of the first things I did when I got the bike was to remove and solder the three yellow wires together and threw away that plug. Should I cut them to test the stator? And when you say "50VAC with engine @ 3000 RPM" does that mean there will be an alternating current from those wires? And do I test them by connecting each wire to my multi-meter, like connect a yellow wire to a positive lead of the multi-meter and another yellow wire to the negative lead of the multi-meter? Or do I connect one yellow wire to a multi-meter lead and the other multi-meter lead to a ground on the frame?

Also, when I test the ohms, is there anywhere on the engine that would be best to put my lead when doing it? Or just anywhere on the engine?

I am hoping of course the stator is okay, but if not, oh well, poor boy conversion time. But if the stator tests okay, is there a link or easy way to tell me how to test the rectifier/regulator module?

Sorry for so may questions, but I don't want to have to keep bugging you later, so I thought I'd get all the bugging done now. :wink2:

Thanks again DenverWinger!: smile2:
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you roscoepc.

That is a great description on how to do the test. I appreciate your time.

I had removed the three yellow wire plug and soldered the wires as soon as I got the bike because I know that plug can be an issue. But I'll just cut them and test em.

I don't know how you knew I needed so much clarity on how to do this test, but I suppose I'm not the only one that will find this useful. I'm still learning about this stator stuff, It's all pretty new to me.

I truly do appreciate the time you took to help me out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,958 Posts
Don't be too quick to go poorboy.

You can do the tests from the wire harness at the regulator. That way you're not cutting your solder job, but...if that's the last place you worked on the bike, it's the first place I'd look for something that got overlooked during the job.
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Don't be too quick to go poorboy.

You can do the tests from the wire harness at the regulator. That way you're not cutting your solder job, but...if that's the last place you worked on the bike, it's the first place I'd look for something that got overlooked during the job.
Thanks Dennis.

I was going to start at looking at my solder job. I'm a pretty decent solderer and did shrink tube the joints well. But I'll check them out.

I can't test until later because I had a brain fart last night after I tested the output during running. I hooked up my battery charger on the terminals, made sure pos was on pos and neg was on neg, setting on charger was on 2 amp trickle charge so It would be fully charged by the time I got home from work. But alas, I failed to plug the charger into a working outlet. I have an outlet that is wired to the wall switch, and guess which outlet plugged into? :frown2: And I turned off the light switch when I left the garage. It was a long day, and I am getting older. But more than getting older, I'm absent minded at times, especially on long days. It is charging now though.

One question though. What do you mean "Don't be too quick to go poorboy"? Do you not like the poorboy or is there another alternative I don't know about? :?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,958 Posts
I do not like poorboy fixes. I have never seen one that looked good. They require cutting up parts of the frame, fairing and fan, plus relocating the fan. They create problems much worse than charging issues, like oil leaks from the crank shaft seal which is absolutely unavailable.

It's really not that hard to get the stator out and have it rebuilt.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,921 Posts
I do not like poorboy fixes. I have never seen one that looked good. They require cutting up parts of the frame, fairing and fan, plus relocating the fan. They create problems much worse than charging issues, like oil leaks from the crank shaft seal which is absolutely unavailable.

It's really not that hard to get the stator out and have it rebuilt.
I'm with Dennis, keep it original. I had 2 1985's in the past and each time I looked before buying I would see if it had an alternator conversion there were many I looked at that had the conversion in good shape otherwise, but I passed on them and if I saw one advertised that said it was upgraded to an alternator I figured it was converted and never called to inquire about the bike, but that's just me and my take about a bike that was butchered....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,377 Posts
I don't know how you knew I needed so much clarity on how to do this test, but I suppose I'm not the only one that will find this useful. I'm still learning about this stator stuff, It's all pretty new to me.
I didn't know that you did but we might as well cover this thing as good as we can starting with the stator... As Dennis said, you can do this test at the stator connector, which if there is no evidence of wires getting hot there and burning I would suggest removing it and soldering all the wires there.. It'll burn sooner or later!!


The other place to check for bad wiring is at the starter solenoid. Check the two red-red/white wires at the solenoid connector for burning. If you still have the OEM dogbone fuse I would suggest replacing that with an inline 30 amp spade type fuse holder..


I've not really heard of a decent test for the regulator but if you decide that's the problem I would suggest staying with the OEM Shindengen which you can get at Regulator Rectifier.com for about half of what other Honda wants for one!!


Let us know what else you need!!
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
"Stator Test

1- First, put the bike on the centerstand. Cut the wires on both sides of the stator connector plug. Strip the insulation aprox. 1/2"-1" back on all three yellow wires. Label each wire A, B, and C.

2- With a multimeter, digital or analog, set to read resistance, check each leg to ground for short's. If no short's are found, (o resistance), you're good to go so far.

3- With the meter set to read resistance, check across each leg. A to B, B to C, then C to A. The reading's should be about 3 ohm's. If you read infinite resistance across any of the legs you have an open winding and the stator is bad. If they read good, keep going,"
I did Step 2 and there was 0 resistance on all three legs. I had measure at the unplugged plug from the regulator. I didn't want to undue my solder job yet. I checked it and it still all looked great. I will attach a photo of where I connected to do the tests. I used 2 different pretty good quality multi-meters.

When I did step 3, bad news. All three, A to B, A to C, and B to C showed 0 resistance. Is it uncommon for all three to read zero? Or am I doing something wrong?

Thanks for your time.
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,677 Posts
Turn the meter to the 200 ohm setting then ignore the readings and do the AC voltage test.
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Turn the meter to the 200 ohm setting then ignore the readings and do the AC voltage test.
I will do the AC voltage test as soon as I get a chance. Maybe tonight. If not then tomorrow for sure.

But one question about your reply... If I turn the meter to the 200 ohm setting and then ignore the readings, do you mean to just do the AC voltage test and not worry about the ohm test results?

It's been another long day and I confuse easily. :wink2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,377 Posts
All stator's are not the same and can have different resistance... Go ahead and check the AC voltage and let us know what you get.. I'm assuming you've inspected the plug for indications it's getting hot and starting to burn??
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
All stator's are not the same and can have different resistance... Go ahead and check the AC voltage and let us know what you get.. I'm assuming you've inspected the plug for indications it's getting hot and starting to burn??
Just heading out to do some yard work and hopefully the AC voltage test.

The first thing I did when I got the bike was remove the plug and soldered the three wires. I've had three Goldwings and know that that plug can be problematic. I inspected my work on those and everything looks great. I am a pretty good solderer and am careful to do things like that with thoroughness.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,736 Posts
Pat,
Don't forget to do as Dave said. If you are reading in a very high range setting the meter will not pick up just a few ohms of resistance. It needs to be more sensitive thus the 200 ohm range. If you get 50 plus AC volts at 3,000 RPM you don't have to do the ohm test. The stator is good then.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,980 Posts
just a recap:

if each, of the different windings, produces 50VAC or more, at 3000 rpm.

AND IF, there is no continuity from the windings to frame ground,

the stator is good.


Under this circumstance, the windings should show a small resistance of equal value from A to B to C to A .

this last test though, is not needed if the 1st test is good. :wink2:



.
 

·
Patrick Brandon
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I tested the AC voltage and got 70 VAC at A, 45 VAC at B, and 45 VAC at C. In the photo attached it shows where I tested them. I had previously soldered them at the notoriously bad plug, so this was my only option, or cut my solder job. Is it okay to test at the Rectifier/Regulator plug like this?

Also, when I moved the multi-meter to the correct setting of 200 for ohms, I got 00.7 ohms resistance on each leg.

And as I mentioned before, there were no shorts to ground from the yellow wires.

I am curious as to what you guys conclude from these results.

I will make you guys all cookies or pie for all your help. I'm not really sure how long to boil cookies or pie so I better let my girl lady Annie do it. :grin3::wink2:
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,377 Posts
Did you have the regulator unplugged during the test?? If it was plugged in, unplug it and do the test again.... And check leg to leg, not leg to ground!!!
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top