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Well, ok then, I had previously posted about my temp going up, and had decided to order and replace the thermostat, as most of the panels were coming off the bike anyway to paint, at least a small part of the job is done. Got to the very first bolt (of 3x ) in the thermostat cover....and snappo !!...:shock: the head and about 4mm of bolt came out, the remainder staying well and truly in the housing....so...I would like to try to maybe still remove the thermostat cover and maybe get vice grips to turn the bolt (if I can get hold of it), or (as I suspect) is it a "thermostat housing out" job??..as in I guess carbs out :sadguy: and "get at" the housing to remove, from the top?...have you any advice or suggestions re. this job please....:praying:
 

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You can remove the housing from the front of the engine with out going near the carbs i broke two bolts when changing mine i drilled then out and put in nuts and bolts
 

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As Peter says, the housing comes out easily enough. You might be able to weld a nut to the stump of the bolt, and turn it out.
 

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Thank you for the info Peter and GW, that's much better news than I expected to hear, :cheesygrin: , so, would it be best to leave the cover and thermostat in place then and take the whole assembly out and then repair?...it looks like the housing should maybe pull forward a little to remove it from the water pipes at the back? and, I guess best to replace all "O" rings as I go?
Many thanks,
Peter.
 

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The Irish Crew
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That's how I would do it Peter. Take the whole unit over to the bench and sort it out there.
 

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Hi Dave, I was lucky really, when I removed the cover and then the housing, there was enough bolt sticking out to put in the bench vice and turn out, so am now waiting patiently for new t/stat, "rubber" and "O" rings (water pipes) to arrive. Am considering putting in "Hex head" bolts to replace the 3x originals in the cover, good idea or not do ya reckon?
Many thanks,
Peter.
 

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groutby wrote:
Hi Dave, I was lucky really, when I removed the cover and then the housing, there was enough bolt sticking out to put in the bench vice and turn out, so am now waiting patiently for new t/stat, "rubber" and "O" rings (water pipes) to arrive. Am considering putting in "Hex head" bolts to replace the 3x originals in the cover, good idea or not do ya reckon?
Many thanks,
Peter.
Sounds like a good idea to me. Go with stainless if you can find them and use some anti sieze compound on the threads whatever kind of bolts you use.
 

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I'd definitely go with some anti seize on the threads of the new bolts, but I would go with the lower grade OEM bolts, as they will be more likely to snap 1st before the SS ones and not the T/S housing, if you over torque them.

Don't forget that with the anti seize on the threads, the actual torque on the bolt itself will be more that the torque setting on your torque wrench!
 

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Dusty, I am curious, you said:



"Don't forget that with the anti seize on the threads, the actual torque on the bolt itself will be more that the torque setting on your torque wrench"






Can you explain?
 

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The anti seize acts as a lubricant and reduces friction and hence reduces the actual torque needed to get to the specified torque value.

So say your setting on the torque wrench is set at ... 15ftlbs ...and you tighten the bolt up to the indicted value, as per the torque wrench, because of the lubricating properties of the anti seize, the bolts actual torque is slightly higher, probably in the 17-20ftlbs range, possibly slightly higher, depending on the metals/amount of anti seizeinvolved
 

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Thank you for the comments and advice, hadn't given a thought to torque when using thread lock...am now tho.
Still..... :waiting: waiting for my parts to arrive....Hmm..
 

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Dusty,

I get it- thanks... I never thought about it but makes sense.

I have always had a heavy hand when tightening and have broke many a fastener by over tightening. Some years ago I bought a sears beam type torque wrench and that has been very helpful in controlling my urge to crank things down. I am skeptical about it's accuracy however- and have wondered about the accuracy of the harbor freight click type wrenches. Anyone have any particular experience with them?
 

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I suffered from the same illness, which I called 'Reefer Madness' :coollep:

I also had a beam type, but switched over to the same type as the HF one we get up here at our version of HF, called Pricess Auto.

Works well, as long as you remember to loosen off the torque setting when done.
 

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Junior Grue
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The click type torque wrench is great for production work but I would never trust a cheap one. Even an expensive one needs to be checked for calibration ever year or two.

For home use I recommend and use the beam type. I have two, one for ft-lb and one for in-lb.
 
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