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Discussion Starter #1
I have looked at the forum for other threads and did not have success. I am a new Goldwing owner but an old biker and the carbs on this thing will not allow it to work under strain.. IE: letting out the clutch to start moving. Much hesitation on bringing up throttle .... until I get it wide open.... AND it takes forever (and I mean forever) for it to get warmed up enough to take the choke off for it to idle well.

Does anyone have any secret tips to solving the issue before I have to rip the carbs off and do a rebuild on them?

QUESITON 2: If I DO have to remove them, is there a way I can keep the linkage synced enough so I do not have the re-sync them when the go back together on the rails.

Thanks all and here is to another riding season come MAY for us in Montana......
 

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Mix 2-3 oz of SEAFOAM per gallon of gas at your next "fill-up". In town and on "surface" roads keep your RPM's at or BELOW 2K. It's not an over-nite fix, and might take 3-4 tanks to get it to run smoother, , ,but its a lot easier than tearing into them carbs. You want to clean the "low rpm/idle" jets and anything over 2k will bypass those jets.
 

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Did the bike sit for an extended length of time? If so it is likely and common for the low speed circuit to gum up as Bluthunder was speaking. Is the bike new to you or do you know it's history?
Judging by the symptoms it seems all but certain you have a fuel issue. The first thing that comes to mind is the scenario stated above. Another possibility could be a bad vacuum petcock that does not open fully. Also if someone has done carb work previously it is possible the float level was adjusted too low. Any/all of these will make the engine run very lean and starved for fuel. The Seafoam could help as Bluthunder said but beware that I have seen low speed circuits so plugged that even carburetor dip did not clean them first or second time. Some have had to push a fine wire through the low speed ports to get them open.
 

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I bought a '94SE back around 2002 or so.....
it had sat up in a shed in Glendale, Aridzona for over two years.

gummed up? you bet.
I just rode it, strangling all the the way, with a half can of SeaFoam in every tank of gas.

best I remember, it took about 4 months to get it to running smooth...
I never did work on the carbs, just rode it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did the bike sit for an extended length of time? If so it is likely and common for the low speed circuit to gum up as Bluthunder was speaking. Is the bike new to you or do you know it's history?
Judging by the symptoms it seems all but certain you have a fuel issue. The first thing that comes to mind is the scenario stated above. Another possibility could be a bad vacuum petcock that does not open fully. Also if someone has done carb work previously it is possible the float level was adjusted too low. Any/all of these will make the engine run very lean and starved for fuel. The Seafoam could help as Bluthunder said but beware that I have seen low speed circuits so plugged that even carburetor dip did not clean them first or second time. Some have had to push a fine wire through the low speed ports to get them open.
Yes, it has sat for several years....... in the barn..... with the chickens and a horse or two...... quite a nice layer of barn dust on the whole thing.... I resigned myself to pull the carbs... and now need to get two rebuild kits instead of trying to repair/refurb existing...
321068
321069
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I bought a '94SE back around 2002 or so.....
it had sat up in a shed in Glendale, Aridzona for over two years.

gummed up? you bet.
I just rode it, strangling all the the way, with a half can of SeaFoam in every tank of gas.

best I remember, it took about 4 months to get it to running smooth...
I never did work on the carbs, just rode it.
Well I cannot even get it to roll without running it up to 6K and feathering the clutch as best I can...... cannot get a smooth twist to even get going..... I pulled the dang carbs and though a carb is a carb is a carb... these will be a first for me. Thanks for the input!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Mix 2-3 oz of SEAFOAM per gallon of gas at your next "fill-up". In town and on "surface" roads keep your RPM's at or BELOW 2K. It's not an over-nite fix, and might take 3-4 tanks to get it to run smoother, , ,but its a lot easier than tearing into them carbs. You want to clean the "low rpm/idle" jets and anything over 2k will bypass those jets.
there must be more plugged up than the slow jets then..... I can get the R's up easily enough when in neutral, but cannot do a thing when attempting to start rolling..... guess pulling them is the course to take. Thanks!!!
 

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Read your manual when adjusting float height. It is the most common mistake people make. You can not just invert the carbs and adjust. Also an impact screwdriver to get the screws out of the air cleaner base and the screws that hold the filter housing to the base. Just be careful. If a screw is being stubborn get out the impact screwdriver might be needed. If you strip out the Phillips heads of the screws you have problems.
 

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Buy the stock gaskets from Honda and clean the jets and other parts.
Which is good advise unless you need an accelerator pump, then you are better off buying the kit from Randakks.
 

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Read your manual when adjusting float height. It is the most common mistake people make. You can not just invert the carbs and adjust. Also an impact screwdriver to get the screws out of the air cleaner base and the screws that hold the filter housing to the base. Just be careful. If a screw is being stubborn get out the impact screwdriver might be needed. If you strip out the Phillips heads of the screws you have problems.
Read "jisscrewdriver.com". The screws are likely JIS not Phillips and Vessel Tool company has them in an impact version too. I recently rebuilt my carbs and JIS screws are tight and very easy to strip using a Phillips screwdriver. Buy or borrow a JIS for working on JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) which often have a dot or small "x" on the head. My JIS screw drivers and bits are my favorite screw drivers and I rarely use the Phillips anymore because JIS works better on them too. IMO
 
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