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Getting air pressure the same in my forks is a pain (95 SE).

My '83 Venture had a crosstie tube to allow a single schrader valve to fill both.

I know progressive made something like this (since discontinued),

so I'm looking for anyone who has designed/ installed their own version.



Any info appreciated.
 

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Having the same amount of air in each fork is not that important.
 

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Since you don't back your statement w/ any info, guess I'll have to ignore it.

It makes sense to have the same pressure to have symmetrical response from the suspension.
 

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Okay, If you are hung up on symmetry than there would be an advantage to having exactly the same air pressure in each fork leg. It would put your mind at ease.

Your bike (GL1500) has air assisted rear suspension. It applies air to the right shock only without causing an asymmetrical response. There are sophisticated racing forks that have the rebound dampening adjustment in one fork leg and the compression dampening adjustment in the other.

Your forks are an assembly that moves up and down as a unit. For there to be any ill effect from more air in one leg the axle, the fender,and the bottom of the fork legs would have to bend. They won't.
 

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Rather than trying to even up the air pressure on your forks why not install Progressive fork springs which don't need any air in the forks at all? You'll have your desired symmetry but better handling as well. Not all 1500's use air in the forks anyway, many models don't even have Shrader valves in the top of the forks. Unbalanced air pressure in the fork tubes really won't make a difference to start with since the maximum pressure is so low to start with. Since there are about 2.5 square inches in a fork tube 6psi would only give you about 36lbs maximum lift on the front end. High air pressure in the forks also tends to wear the forks seals more rapidly as well.
 

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ka9nyn wrote:
Since you don't back your statement w/ any info, guess I'll have to ignore it.

It makes sense to have the same pressure to have symmetrical response from the suspension.
In 1980 and 1981 Honda installed a single air valve on the CB900 Customs and the rear shocks were the same way. Look around for those years of bikes and you might find what you're looking for.
 

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ka9nyn wrote:
Since you don't back your statement w/ any info, guess I'll have to ignore it.

It makes sense to have the same pressure to have symmetrical response from the suspension.
Really?? A fellow member offers some information and you slam him buy stating you will have to ignore it. I see you have not posted much here, we try to be a little more appreciative around here when somebody is trying to help us.
 

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Goldwinger, Well put.
 

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Goldwinger:



I'm usually appreciative of responses which don't amount to a blow off.
The other folks who responded (thanks for the included info) were helpful
and most appreciated.


If either of you, FeButter (Iron Butter) or Goldwinger, wish to take issue w/

me, feel free to take it to PM, so we can speak freely!


That being said, I'm terribly sorry if I bruised Iron Butters feelings,

and no, I'm not 'hung up on symmetry',

it just seemed to make sense to me... although that is of little

consequence in this case...



I'll do my best , in future, to not bother you folks

w/ my petty questions or concerns.


'nuff said.
 
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