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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Helping someone without internet with their Wing and need help. Pulled his alternator and cleaned it up as he was having charging issues. Put alternator back in and the positive battery wire made contact. Negative was still hooked up (my fault should have checked it was fully disconnected). So spark show at the alternator wiring harness and the 55 amp fuse near the battery melted. Replaced the fuse and now we have a bike with plenty of juice and a single click or clunk from the solenoid with no starter crank.

What is the mostly likely fried component? I'm thinking solenoid, but not positive. Solenoid tests good continuity downside of the switch (fuse blades) but none on the posts that hook to battery. I don't know anything about solenoids.

Wanted to ask opinions before dropping 60 bucks on the solenoid.
 

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Was the key on or starter button pushed when it shorted?

Check all fuses on left side of bike notably 2 and 8. Fuse 12 which is 5A and on the right of fuse strip, relay side of box below relays. Check 30A fuse at relay A to the right of battery which powers ignition. There is also a 5A fuse (to the left of battery?) for relay B of starter that needs checking.

With key on relay A needs to see 12V on yellow/red wire with start button pushed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Was the key on or starter button pushed when it shorted?

Check all fuses on left side of bike notably 2 and 8. Fuse 12 which is 5A and on the right of fuse strip, relay side of box below relays. Check 30A fuse at relay A to the right of battery which powers ignition. There is also a 5A fuse (to the left of battery?) for relay B of starter that needs checking.

With key on relay A needs to see 12V on yellow/red wire with start button pushed.
No key in ignition. I will check those fuses when I can. Wings have a lot of fuses! I know for a fact the one on the top of the solenoid (30a) is good.

I did pull a ton and didn't see any but the 55 amp strip fuse blown, but I will grab a manual and check the others.
 

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Test the fuses with a light or multimeter, don't just look see. There are metal contacts on the face ends to test both sides of the fuse.
 

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Sounds like either the battery got fried or drained from the event or one of your pos. Cables is bad.
Try jumping the solenoid-make sure you know how to safely do that- bike in neutral etc.
If starter cranks by jumping solenoid then replace it (solenoid). If not you are back to battery, or cables.
I would charge and load test battery first.
 

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An additional thought not presented above - is that these charge-wire-to-ground issues put a lot of stress on a splice in the battery cable (the cable from the battery to alternator is spliced as a "Y" to also provide high current battery supply to the fuse box) -- check a few of the HIGH amperage fuses to see that you're seeing +12V on them (regardless of key position, and that the voltage doesn't drop below 10V while trying to crank). My favorite fuse supplies to check after one of these instances would be the "HORN/TURN/STOP", and the "TAIL/METER/POSITION" fuse (should have 12 direct from the battery all the time!!)

Also, press in your "CRUISE ON" switch -- the dash's amber "CRUISE ON" indicator MUST light-up with the kill-switch in RUN and the key in ON position.

Good luck --
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well all fuses under the saddlebag are good. I have yet to identify two relays I can only locate the main solenoid right of the battery. I will ask the owner to load test the battery and then check the wires
 

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What you are calling the solenoid is actually relay A. Why everyone calls them a solenoid I don't know:) Technically a solenoid is a electro-mechanical device like seen on a car starter. Magnetic coils would push a plunger to engage starter drive. OK back to topic.

Relay B is to the right and down from A. Just follow the battery cable to A then B and on to starter.

Just to be clear what year is the bike, the SE model in your sig?
 

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There's a second dogbone fuse under the seat. Might not have anything to do with starting problems but should be checked if the bike has been shorted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What you are calling the solenoid is actually relay A. Why everyone calls them a solenoid I don't know:) Technically a solenoid is a electro-mechanical device like seen on a car starter. Magnetic coils would push a plunger to engage starter drive. OK back to topic.

Relay B is to the right and down from A. Just follow the battery cable to A then B and on to starter.

Just to be clear what year is the bike, the SE model in your sig?
96 SE. I don't remember seeing relay B. Is it deeper under the right side panel, more toward the front of the bike?

There's a second dogbone fuse under the seat. Might not have anything to do with starting problems but should be checked if the bike has been shorted.
That one is good, but I'll put the meter on it anyway.
 

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Relay B should be to the left of engine oil fill cap and requires removal of the next panel forward for access.
 
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