Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I just purchased my first Goldwing last month and love it. It ran great for the first three of four weeks with no electrical or battery issues and then a couple days ago the battery was dead. A full charge and it was dead again the next morning. I disconnected the negative cable and using a test light between the negative cable and negative post the bulb flashes on and off, fairly bright at about the same rate and a turn signal or hazard light. I have pulled all of the fuses on the left side panel one by one getting the same flashing test light in every case. I’m only measuring 2.3 mili amps draw from cable to post but suspect more as I do see a slight spark on connection and the brightness of the test light.



I’m using a cheap ammeter and will get a nicer one and retest this evening.



Any ideas or help would be appreciated.



Love the bike and this looks like a great source of information.



Thanks

Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,608 Posts
imported post

Welcome to the crew! I have a 99 SE, and I had a bad Hitatchi alternator. The thing is, I don't get the "flashing light" thing. Something else is going on? You should check the voltage from the alternator at 2-3000 rpms. Should be around 14 volts. If not, then you can look closer at the alt.. If you get 14-14.7 volts, then something is amiss in the wiring/connectors. The battery HAS to be in good shape,too. I'd charge it up, and then see if it drains off overnight. It should hold a charge for weeks. A load test is ideal. A little drop is expected, but if you get below 12 volts the battery is toast. Alternator problems are common with the Hitatchi's made in China. They can be rebuilt into a great unit, but need rewound, bearings, diodes, brushes, etc.. You may have a brush sticking/worn. Let us know more along the diagnosis, We'll figure it out. jimsjinx
 

·
Premium Member
1993 gl1500, 1976 gl1000
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
imported post

First thing is to start pulling fuses until the flashing light stops flashing. Then you will know where to start looking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
425 Posts
imported post

Interesting.



I recall getting a slight arc when reconnecting the battery. Mine will stay up for quite some time (months).



There is very little that stays powered with the key off. Especially since you pulled all the fuses and it hasn't helped. I'm suspicious of a bad battery. The bike may have been unused for a while and now that you're riding every day, the load ups and downs are taking a toll. I'd check the electrolite and put it on a slow charge, disconnected from the bike, ride it and then disconnect again overnight. But I'd be thinking about a new battery.



Note that the GL1500 battery has to be right up to fire. This thing will crank great but not start and drive you nuts looking for something when it turns out it wasn't charged enough.



Lastly. Since you're in and out, go ahead and leave the side cover off. Those grommets are only good for a few ins and outs. If you have a chance, buy some new grommets just in case and tie the side cover to the bike's frame when you're done playing with the battery. Rudy's tethers or fishing line will save aggravation and a couple hunderd bucks later.



WELCOME TO THE GREATEST SITE ON THE ENTIRE WORLD WIDE WEB!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

Andy

You are probably correct on the battery diagnosis. It’s probably the original battery and the bike has seen years of garage time with an unattended or charged battery.

I’ll have it load tested first before spending hours chasing wires and fuses.

I just couldn’t figure out the flashing test light.

Everything else was working perfect and it fires up with just a touch to the starter switch when charged.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
imported post

dingdong wrote:
First thing is to start pulling fuses until the flashing light stops flashing. Then you will know where to start looking.
> Ditto, That's Step#1

> Step #2, is start pulling apart Electrical Connectors, along whatever circuit you've identified via the fuses/relays... gradually reducing the possible Locations where the problem can lay.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top