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I had tried a few different ways to fix a crack in the ABS plastic on a side panel.Nothing that I tried worked. I asked Steve if it would be ok to come and see how he was doing the repair work on his plastic that had been in a wreck. Steve invited me over and showed mewhat he had done. Very nice work. After explaining it he also volunteerd to show me how it is done on MY plastic. After watching him I asked to be allowed to try my hand at it. Steve even took some pictures of me doing a littl of the repair. I worked on the side that will not be visable. I need to practice and get as good as Steve is before I work on anything that will be seen.





The small black scars on the crack line are tack welds that Steve made to hold it together while the real work progressed.



This is the crack repaired and on the bike. Now I will get to work with some sandpaper and get it smooth. Then instead of painting it , Iwillapply a printed decal, a mirror image of the other side cover.
 

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I will post a picture when it is finished.
 

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Monkey with a Football
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I'm curious as to what makes the panel strong again at the crack?
 

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Many years ago i used Marine Tex on cracks that developed in my trunk at the mounting holes. Still holding great after many years.

Also wuld like to see finished product !!

Jim
 

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Well, I can tell you how I repair cracked plastic at my body shop. Might be different, but it works for me!

First, I cut a piece of 1/4in hardware cloth to fit over the crack. Hardware cloth is a heavy gauge metal screen, fairly stiff yet bendable. Give about 2 inches of width across the crack.

Shape the cut cloth to the panel on the back side of the panel. If the panel is floppy, align and support the sides of the crack as needed; get creative!

Use a heat gun and flat screwdriver to heat the plastic and embed the screen in the plastic. Use a cool flat surface underneath and roll the panel [if curved] to support the heated plastic so you dont bow it outward.

As you embed the cloth, drag the screwdriver across top wire of the cloth, which embeds the lower wire and "screeds" the melted plastic across the lower wire.

After everything cools down, apply 3M Rigid Plastic epoxy on top of the embedded wire screen. This provides additional strength and ensures the repair is totally sealed from the back.

Notch the crack on the outside face,and look for the grid of the screen to be "telegraphed" to the outside in the footprint of the repair. Sand and fill as needed, prime and paint!

My experience with this technique is 100% success!
 

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Oldtimer68, It is called PlastiFix. And even though it looks black it is a white powder and a clear liquid that you mix together.



http://www.urethanesupply.com/plastifixhowto.php



Rudy, as shown in the picture it was tack welded with a Butane Pencil Torch to keep it lined up. Then a valley was groung out with a dremel and a cutting bit. Next the plastifix was added filling in the valley. Turn the piece over and grind another valley at the crack line, fill with the plastifix and your are done with the actual crack fix. Now it is just sanding it smooth and then the final finish of a decal or paint.



I know very little aboutthis, just what Steve was able to show me in a short time.
 
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