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Having been in engineering and technical support for the last 20 years, I can assure each and every one of you "Yes, Virginia, there ARE such things as stupid questions!"

But here's MY stupid question about crosswinds:

When I'm hit by the cross wind ...

Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
 

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The goldwing is about as aerodynamic as the broad side of a barn in cross winds and theentire bikegets pushed by the wind, but you automatically adjust by lean angle into the wind. Seems the faster you go the easier it is to maintain a staight line.:action:
 

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dbdataplus wrote:
...When I'm hit by the cross wind ...
Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
> Yes


The Force by the cross wind is equally applied across the top and bottom of the bike... However, the bottom of the bike has a Resistive Force in the form of Friction between tires & road, which pushes back against the wind... So long as you're not in a hurricane, then the tires provide enough force to counter the wind.
 

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dbdataplus wrote:
Having been in engineering and technical support for the last 20 years, I can assure each and every one of you "Yes, Virginia, there ARE such things as stupid questions!"

But here's MY stupid question about crosswinds:

When I'm hit by the cross wind ...

Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
It all depends on if the glass(or fuel tank) is half full, or half empty.:?
 

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seabee_ wrote:
dbdataplus wrote:
Having been in engineering and technical support for the last 20 years, I can assure each and every one of you "Yes, Virginia, there ARE such things as stupid questions!"

But here's MY stupid question about crosswinds:

When I'm hit by the cross wind ...

Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
It all depends on if the glass(or fuel tank) is half full, or half empty.:?
Now if you where an engineer, you'd know, that the glass (or fuel tank) is never half empty, or half full. It is always, twice as big as it needs to be....;).

I believe itis actually the frame mounted fairing that is the killer of a good ride on a goldwing in a heavy crosswind, think of it as walking out of Home Depot with a 8' x 5' sheet of plywood when the winds blowing, the thing acts like sail, and as for just speeding up and leaning into it to overcome it, thats fine if your in a nice sustained windbut where I live we get huge gusts that just suddenly stop, that in itself will put you in the oncoming lane.
 

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Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?

Neither!
It's all in your mind...try a 3/4 or full face helmet to cover your ears & prevent the wind from whistling through. :cheesygrin:
 

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Not sure...rode across Oklahoma a while back....steady 30mph cross wind...not fun...felt like it made the bike jump sideways 3 ft at times.....
 

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ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
dbdataplus wrote:
...When I'm hit by the cross wind ...
Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
> Yes


The Force by the cross wind is equally applied across the top and bottom of the bike... However, the bottom of the bike has a Resistive Force in the form of Friction between tires & road, which pushes back against the wind... So long as you're not in a hurricane, then the tires provide enough force to counter the wind.
+1 Alex......I rode this spring in constant 35+mph winds with gusts up to bout 60mph...long as your in a decent lean against it you will be fine....I think it affects the top more (fairing especially), and the bigger the shield the more wind it catches....
 

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Blimey, this isn't hard. The point at which the tires touch the road is the fulcrum and the bike can be viewed as a lever. Any side force is trying to push the bike over. The higher the force is applied, the more mechanical advantage it has. And by the way, a belly pan is a placebo for countering these forces.
 

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I think air is like water flowing in a river. Something called laminar flow – air speed near the surface would be less than that away from the ground. I'll bet the effect is less than changes in overall wind speed caused by gusts though.
 

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A crosswind tries to blow the bike downwind so the rider compensates by steering a bit upwind . The upwind steering causes the bike to lean into the wind a bit. If you hold your line of travel when a gust hits you should notice that the bike leans more into the wind when the wind hits and then stands back up as the wind ebbs.I don't think the Goldwing handles much different than any bike. It does have a lot more sail area but it also has more weight which somewhat compensates. The main trick is not to tense up but go with the flow and let the bike do the work. Staying loose and not tensing up in wind or on slippery roads is important. Sometime when you think the going is a bit difficult try gripping the false tank with your nees. If your shoulders and elbows droop that's a good indication that you need to relax. Being tense and stiff makes it more difficult to ride in bad weather or conditions.
 

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tmdriverwannabe wrote:
ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
dbdataplus wrote:
...When I'm hit by the cross wind ...
Is it blowing my 1500's top over?
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me?
> Yes


The Force by the cross wind is equally applied across the top and bottom of the bike... However, the bottom of the bike has a Resistive Force in the form of Friction between tires & road, which pushes back against the wind... So long as you're not in a hurricane, then the tires provide enough force to counter the wind.
+1 Alex......I rode this spring in constant 35+mph winds with gusts up to bout 60mph...long as your in a decent lean against it you will be fine....I think it affects the top more (fairing especially), and the bigger the shield the more wind it catches....
Are you referring to my ride home LOL
I still remember those winds too!
Now that I am in better physical shape (if I stay this way) and more used to the 1500 I may try that ride again. Let me know when the Snow is gone and above 50F or so :ROFL:

I agree about that fairing and shield, really catches it hard!
As the wind gets harder or lighter you compensate by leaning into it more or less, that leaning into a sudden gust quick is what makes the bottom feel like it is blowing out from under the wing.

Also kills fuel mileage, that first fill up on way home I got like 25mpg in those winds! Never got that bad since!

And watch those side covers! The wind likes to eat those also! :X
 

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Riding in a straight line down the road, with a lean angle of just about any sort, scares Mrs. Jones, as she's behind you waiting for the wreck to happen.

:D

Crosswinds make us either stupid or dare-devils, ...or stupid dare-devils 'cordin' to her..

Makes me feel alive. :smiler:
 

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I can relate to what you are asking about what the wind is doing. As some have said, the wind tries to blow you off course and you compensate by leaning into the wind. What this sometimes translates to is the feeling that the bike is being pushed out form under you by the wind. My old BMW felt worse that the Wing does. I would have swore that there were times that the BMW would fly right out form under me. It never did and I don't think I have ever heard of it happening to anyone.
 

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My 1100 feels dramatically more stable in the wind then my naked cx500 did. I do think the extra weight gives more traction on the road. While huge gusts get one's attention, I agree, staying relaxed is the best course to take when the winds are a howlin'.

Chuck
 

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...point at which the tires touch the road is the fulcrum and the bike can be viewed as a lever. Any side force is trying to push the bike over. The higher the force is applied, the more mechanical advantage it has. ...
+1... and to keep from blowing OVER, you have to lean the bike into the wind so that the center of gravity is into the wind to counter this tipping force...

Is it blowing my 1500's top over? YES
Or is it blowing the bottom out from under me? NO
 

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Just once on a night ride did I ever become concerned about strong winds from the side. Slowed down, found shelter and within 30 minutes got back on the road because the intensity of the storm lessened. The pivot point of the bike is where the rubber meets the road. Anything can go wrong from that point up if you speed, turn sharply or even go too slow! Bill
 

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exavid wrote:
A crosswind tries to blow the bike downwind so the rider compensates by steering a bit upwind . The upwind steering causes the bike to lean into the wind a bit. If you hold your line of travel when a gust hits you should notice that the bike leans more into the wind when the wind hits and then stands back up as the wind ebbs.I don't think the Goldwing handles much different than any bike. It does have a lot more sail area but it also has more weight which somewhat compensates. The main trick is not to tense up but go with the flow and let the bike do the work. Staying loose and not tensing up in wind or on slippery roads is important. Sometime when you think the going is a bit difficult try gripping the false tank with your knees. If your shoulders and elbows droop that's a good indication that you need to relax. Being tense and stiff makes it more difficult to ride in bad weather or conditions.
Paul is right on the money :grinner: :cooler:

You guys need to get out and ride more in those types of conditions to gain more experience!! :smiler:

Winds don't usually concern me and I've ridden in plenty of them all over this continent .... just means I have to ride with one hand on the bars, is all! :?The big heavywings handle winds, steady or gusting, just fine.
 
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