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Yesterday, I had a close call...Probably my first one since I've been riding.. I had just left the Air Museum at Warner Robins, GA and was heading south on US Highway 129.. I was going to cut across to Perry, hit US 41 and meander my way back to Chula heaven.. I was in the right lane, traveling on a divided 4 lane highway and I was approaching my turn, but wasn't quite sure if it actually was my turn. A couple of miles back, I encountered a female on her cell phone, riding in the left lane...and she was going about 5 mph under the speed limit, so I did something that I didn't want to do, but I passed her on the right hand side. I noticed a gentleman driving a silver Isuzu Trooper who was behind this young lady, riding her bumper..After he realized that she wasn't going to yield to him and move to the right lane, he himself changed to the right lane and was now directly on my donkey...As we approached the intersection, our side went from 2 lanes to 3...the 3rd being a right turn lane. Not being absolutely familiar with the area, I didn't immediately turn on my blinker and get into the turn lane...Having hesitated, the cat driving the Isuzu went hammer down just about the same time that I decided to take the turn lane..And at that point in time, I heard his brakes lock up, and as I looked back, his vehicle was gyrating from side to side, attempting to control the skid.... I felt bad about my hesitancy to change lanes and causing him to lock up his brakes, but had he not been making a qualifying attempt at the Daytona 500, none of this would have happened. But sadly, this was my fault because I had already observed him riding the lady's bumper...at a very uncomfortable distance...

After all of this, I switched back to the through lane and altered my route...I guess that it was gnawing at my gut as to how close I'd come to causing an accident. There was a part of me ( and still is) that wanted to blame him because of his aggressive driving, but I had already observed his behavior so shame on me..

I rode another 10 miles before stopping at a Publix to buy my wife a carrot cake (than GOD she wasn't with me)...and then proceeded to make my way to the house..approximately 70 miles.. I thought about the incident on the way home, but it didn't hinder my ability to ride. I thought a lot about how fortunate I was to experience something like this and live to tell it.. Please don't misunderstand me, I don't fear the bike nor riding the bike...It's just that this has been heavy on my mind all day long...How long will it take for me to get this out of the forefront of my mind..I don't want to forget the experience, I'd just like for it not to dominate my thoughts...

I don't want to sound like a *****, but any and all thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Best regards,
Chester Gunn/Chula, GA
 

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the first time you relax and don't give the incident another thought will be the time you need to call upon your evasive actions again......never ever be complacent with cagers....
 

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I'm glad you came through it without and damage to the bike or yourself, except for your shorts.

Just say a quick silent thank you to the "Big Biker in the Sky" and store it in your memory.

That way the next time it will probably self load when it needs to and have you on your toes.
 

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You've done the right thing. Putting it at the back of your mind until it's safe to rehash / debrief. Never dwell on it as you continue to ride. Stop for a rest if it's really on your nerves. Same goes for road rage.

You could start a diary entitled "I learned about riding from that" and go through it occasionally.
 

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A good lesson learned. Always be aware of what is behind you. More than once I have simply accelerated past my turn and got away from the Idjuiit behind me. I can always make a U-turn up ahead when the coast is clear and come back. I would not worry about forgetting it, just use it to never trust them for a second. If I hear the squall of brakes behind me, I do not even look, it is instantly down into third gear and lets get out of here and wonder about it later. Was not any of your fault, he should have been paying attention.

If you see a car load of tourists going across say the Charleston Bridge, and they are weaving all over the road, and stop in the middle of the main road and stick a camera out the window to take a photo, do you run into them? Nope, because you were watching them, he was not. Just impatient, and I bet he was not going two miles.

Kit
 

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I knew that I picked the wrong night to bare my soul...with this Ferret thing going on...
 

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chesterwgunn wrote:
I knew that I picked the wrong night to bare my soul...with this Ferret thing going on...
:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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It'll let up in a ride or two. I had a close call with my wife riding copilot, and I can tell you, I had visions in my head for days.What if we'd hit that moron? would Barb gone over the handlebars befor hitting the pick up with her head? How would I get to her if I couldn't move, etc.,etc.. After a couple rides,cautiously being aware there is a cager out there somewhere intent on killing us, it sorta went away.I have never "depended" on what the other driver is "supposed" to do, ever since. Glad you are ok, and glad you didn't pick up a perfectly good carrot cake before your ordeal! Might have messed up the frosting!! Safe riding, jimsjinx
 

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chesterwgunn,

I like you have had those "close calls". I just file them for future reference and use them to "read the traffic" in front of me, beside me, and behind me.

I have always told my friends that I have to drive for five people. the four I just mentioned and for myself.

A year ago, I ignored my "front sensors" and it almost got me. I saw the jammed up traffic and instead of dropping "way back", I decided to move over to an open lane and see if I could just get around it all.

My lane was open, and it was a Motorcycle/HOV only lane, so I should have been safe, right? Well, that jumble I foresaw turned into a nightmare that scattered vehicles from the right to full blown left and blocked my way.

I was lucky, I'm still able to talk about it.

I will forever use that memory though to do a better job of reading the traffic. You just can't, ever, quit reading traffic. It is our only salvation.
 

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chesterwgunn wrote:
Blackdog wrote:
chesterwgunn wrote:
I knew that I picked the wrong night to bare my soul...with this Ferret thing going on...
:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
I feel like the "middle child"...
Its always about "Marsha, Marsha, Marsha" or in this case "Rudy, Rudy, Rudy"!:cheeky1:
 

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The important thing is to make this a positive thing for you to remember and to treat it as a learning experience. Your immediate instincts were correct. The next time you encounter a similar situation, you will react in a much safer manner for everyone. Accidents are caused by multiple factors: ie; woman on a cell phone, person tailgating, traveling in the wrong lane, passing on the wrong side, hesitating to make a lane change. By simply eliminating a few of the factors that could have led to an accident; you prevent the accident. This was a lesson for you and everyone who read this thread. The positive things you created by your thread will keep your fellow cyclist friends safer as a result. Take your experience and use it as a positive motivation to ride safer. The fact that you will remember it is a good thing. You just helped many of us with your story!

Bernie
 

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Fear and paranoia are healthy things for us to learn how to manage. The point is to learn from mistakes and move on. You'll never forget the closest calls and you shouldn't but it's something that you can't let paralyze you either.

As Dubs pointed out - accidents are caused by multiple factors. There will never be two exact scenarios but the accumulation of experience and knowledge will enable you to make better judgments when the need arises.

btw - you don't need to be in the seat of a motorcycle to study and practice defensive driving techniques/strategies. The wise ones practice the same thing whether driving a car/truck or motorcycle.
 

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Now maybe....just maybe....the guy in the Isuzu will not follow other vehicles as close in the future.

If so then what you did may have helped save someone else from being rear ended in an accident!
 

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Most of us have had close calls, I hesitate to say it the nature of the beast, but not a day goes by I don't think about one of my close calls over the last 50 years of riding. But it all seems to disappear when I set out, then reflexes take over. I've also adverted a great number of possible incidents. Don't think I'll ever stop riding, till they take my license away, then as long as I have a bike I'll still keep going.:)
 

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In 40+ years of riding, I've had a few close calls. Like any traumatic event, it eats at you hard, but your mind will just get tired of thinking the same thought.

You hesitated while other guy was impatient & close call.

The intensity will wear down, but you will, hopefully, ALWAYS expect any vehicle on the road to do something stupid in an instant .... those few times you are right, are the few times you won't wreck.

Then, there are the animals, road debris around curve, tire goes "POP", invisible sand/ice, etc. It is ALL out there + more.

Learn to 'expect' it, even when there is seemingly nothing to expect. The absolute impossible will happen, eventually.

One thing I'll NEVER understand, is that so many people will look you dead in the eye, & pull right out in front of you. This is a nationwide phenomenon.

Once you realize everyone & everything is 'out-to get-you'....you'll be able to plan/expect/prepare for any event, automatically & then relax & enjoy the ride.

It just takes experience to develop habits & auto-reflexes.
 

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This to shall pass of all the near misses ive had i learned not to take things for granted,learn by your mistakes an old spanish saying make a mistakeonce is ok do it twice its deliberate, we have a poilet program here and its free where by a traffic cop will follow behind you on his bike for about an hour both in city and country then back at the station he will point out your mistakes to you he scores your riding and if you pass they issue a cert that can get you cheaper insurance he will keep telling you always look for the way out of a situation read the road it will save your life
 

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You've already identified the (near) accident chain, so by doing that, it gives you the ammunition to recognized them in future. The memory of the adrenalin will fade, but the lesson should not.

Incidentally, how is the WR museum? I haven't been there since I went to school in Macon, back in 1991. Do they still have an SR-71? How about the B-52? I have pictures from the interior of that B-52 - climbed up inside the bomb bay doors and walked all around inside.
 
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