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After reading the MacLean guide on pulling the rear wheel I cot my confidence up enough to order aset of tires for my 1100 Aspy....then I got to thinking about valve stems... as cheap as they are, it seems like they aught to be changed with the tire or at lease available in case of a problem (like loosinga part while deflating)and I would sure like an "L" shped one in there to improve access......... so I havea few questions



!. how do you get the old one out (cut it off/pull it through or???...;

2. ho you put the new one in ... I think you jus pull it through till it seats but not sure?

3. do you need a special tool to put a new one in .....

4. any tricks that help or "gotchas" to watch out for?



These might seem like really dumb questions but I realized that, while I have changed tires I have never done anything with stems ....



thanks....

Mike
 

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New tire, new valve stem. Just cut the old one and remove it. Tire shops use a tool that screws on the threads of new stem and pulls it through. I've never tried to put one in any other way. Just lube it up and pull it through, the valve stem.
 

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Just put a set on mine. I know they have a special tool for straight stems but not sure about the 90. I just lubed it and used a pair on needle nose (with a piece of cloth in between to protect) to pull it right through at the base. It worked fine. I think the valve stems were about $5 a piece. Jim
 

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if you go with the 90 degree id suggest going with a short steel one. JB
 

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I always replace my valve stems. They aren't so costly as to be unaffordable.
Normally (on a car) the valve stem is good for 3 or 4 years before they start to dry out and start leaking. But on the motorcycle, you push it around a lot more trying to get to it, so you end up putting it through a lot more abuse than they would get on a car.


My mechanic usually changes my valves every other tire change. I usually wear out a set of tires a year. He is comfortable with 2 years on the valves. But the way I see it, I don't like keeping track of which year I changed them and which year I didn't. Especially since I don't change my front and rear tire at the same time. So it's just plain safer to change the valves each time.


The 1500 has the angled valve stem, but it takes so much abuse that it breaks really easily, so Honda puts a plastic holder around it to keep it from flexing too much. Your wheel doesn't have the piece to attach the plastic holder to, so you cannot use the 1500 valve.


There is a metal bolt-in 90 degree bent valve stem on the market that works well. I switched over to it and like it better, because it doesn't give, so it's not likely to break. The problem with the bolt-in valve stem, is my dealer won't touch them. They have to be tightened just the right amount. Too loose and they leak, too tight and they damage the rubber seals and leak. If they leak, you have to take the wheel off the bike again and break the bead on the tire to adjust the bolts. That's a lot of labor so the shop won't risk messing with them. In my case, I have a pair of spare rims so I mount up my replacment tires first, so I can get the valve stem right and make sure it doesn't leak before I put it on the bike.

http://patchboy.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=P&Product_Code=17-562&Category_Code=VS-1
 

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thanks for the quick response .... sounds like something I need to do while I've got the tire off ...... I sure don't want to take the chance of having to re-do a tire just because I left a stem in that was a little too old.....
 

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Be very careful, make sure the stem is not repeat not chinese, there rubber deteriorates and you stand a chance of having a stem fail resulting in a rapid deflation of the tire... this could be exciting... go with the metal bolt on type, not only are they safer, but with a right angle one it makes checking the air pressure easier... so it will get done more often..... good luck

capn
 

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Never use a rubber right angle stem on a bike wheel with no support leg.

Stick with the chrome steel versions for those.
 

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Thanks .... I am not a high speed driver maybe the g-force on the metal stem won't be too bad .... ..... seriously considerinf the right angle or maybe a 45 deg..... I'll stay away from rubber if I go "bent".



There seem to be different diameter valve stems ..... do any of you know which size fits the GL1100 Aspy???? .453" 0r .327" or .625" or ???



Thanks
 

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Leprechaun wrote:
Thanks .... I am not a high speed driver maybe the g-force on the metal stem won't be too bad .... ..... seriously considerinf the right angle or maybe a 45 deg..... I'll stay away from rubber if I go "bent".

It's not the g-force or speed that does the damage. It's the pushing around you do when you check and/or fill the air.


Also I believe that all the motorcycles are the .453 diameter hole.
 
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