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hey all, I got a ? how do you tell if a 1800 has abs brakes by just looking at it, I been looking a one on a car lot , the dealer says it has abs but I don't think he knows that much. I want to up grade from a 1500 to a 1800 but want the abs
 

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Says ABS on the fork caliper covers, for one. Also, there's multi toothed rings on both wheel hubs. A 4" on the right front, and a considerably larger ring on the right rear, by brake rotor. Also, on the water temp gauge, you'll see 2 small screws. Look immediately below the lower screw. There's an ABS light there. It's also in the serial no, but I don't remember the code.
 

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I see the forum "is slowing down" :D in its' ability to provide speedy answers to important questions. :waving:


I note that it took 30 minutes to get a reply to this important bit of info ;)

:cooldevil: Yup, this is the place to be for help. :cooldevil:
 

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It's only the time zone difference between Huntington, Texas and Medford, Oregon.
 

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Wish I knew whether or not I wanted ABS brakes..... being older than dirt, I've never had them, can't understand how they work, and therefore avoid them like my first wife! Don't have them, either on my 2007 KLR 650 or my 2007 ST1300.......

Am I hopelessly antiquated? Is it possible that good technique negates the importance of ABS? If so, where do I go to learn that good technique?

:cheeky1:
 

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Cousin Jack wrote:
Wish I knew whether or not I wanted ABS brakes..... being older than dirt, I've never had them, can't understand how they work, and therefore avoid them like my first wife! Don't have them, either on my 2007 KLR 650 or my 2007 ST1300.......

Am I hopelessly antiquated? Is it possible that good technique negates the importance of ABS? If so, where do I go to learn that good technique?

:cheeky1:
With the onset of winter, I usually find the first vehicles in the ditch are the ones with 4WD.
Maybe they also have ABS who knows.

If you have managed to stay out of trouble so far, keep doing what your doing.

I am not sure if all the new gadgets on bikes and cars enable good drivers to be better rather than making poorer drivers more dangerous:shock:

Probably opened a can of worms on this one :cooldevil:
 

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The ABS in my 97 F350 Ford has darn near caused an accident 50 times or more. Roads are slick and/or I wasn't watching close enough and need to make a quick stop. Apply the brakes a little too hard, braking action as expected, then the wheels begin to lock, the computer instantly releases all brake pressure for about 1 second. I could be wrong at the 1 second, but it's long enough where no braking whatsover is happening and scary as all heck. I'd much rather modulate my own brakes. ABS is like anything automatic, it is always better manual if you have the proper skills. How does the ABS work on these 1800s? Much better than Ford does I pray.
 

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ABS brakes outperform any technique that you may find. There is no way to modulate the brakes in an instant of time with the precision of an ABS system. What the ABS brakes do is avoid wheel lock up, which causes lose of control in emergency braking situations. I have them on my '05 and although I hope never to have to experience their greatness, I'm glad that they are there.




RoryRob
 

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Cousin Jack wrote:
Wish I knew whether or not I wanted ABS brakes..... being older than dirt, I've never had them, can't understand how they work, and therefore avoid them like my first wife! Don't have them, either on my 2007 KLR 650 or my 2007 ST1300.......

Am I hopelessly antiquated? Is it possible that good technique negates the importance of ABS? If so, where do I go to learn that good technique?

:cheeky1:
ABS does not replace Good Technique, I have it, ithas never deployed, I hope my Good Technique keeps it unused, BUT in the event that it is required I may be glad of it....
 

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:waving:Hey CJ:

The actual reason that I own an 1800 was because of the ABS brakes. A few years ago I got into a situation on the interstate where I had my daughter on the bike with me. It was a fairly new bike but had antiquated brakes, in fact single rear and single front unlinked brakes. (actually two years ago, will never forget it)
We survived it. Some by skill some by luck, time was starting to slow down by the time I got the bike under control again. It is always touch and go in an emergency situation when extreme braking is required and the bike goes into a slide, it is a balance of skill and just plain luck.

I have read so many times by people who think they know, that if you practice braking with regular brakes you will always do what you are trained to do. Well not this boy, when your heart gets in your throat and the adrenalin flows, your very first reaction, right or wrong is to hammer that rear brake. That is life, that is what happens in the real world. You realize almost instantly that you just did the wrong thing, but by then you are in recovery mode. It is just what happens.

I suppose you need to find some video of bikes with abs stopping. I do not have any, but have seen them and can tell you on my bike it is impossible to lock up the wheels. Under extreme braking they will stop you and not let the bike go into a slide and out of control.
Others like to say ........well abs causes longer braking distances, they are partly right but not really, see with abs and with the confidence you gain testing them out in a vacant parking lot, you will use them. You know you can romp on them as hard as you like and this allows you to use them to their full potential.....so actually you stop quicker.

That was the reason I bought the wing. All the rest was just a bonus, quite a nice one, but is was for safety that I bought it, the brakes and the power to take an escape route if need be.

Kit

Here you go abs in action.
YouTube - ABS vs. No ABS
YouTube - 2008 BMW F800ST ABS Demo
 

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It would be great if all drivers and riders rode or drove their vehicles within the limits of their capabilities but the more technology improves it seems that drivers and riders push their modes of transport to encompass such advances thereby putting themselves and their fellow travelers at risk.
I imagine the ABS breaking system on a bike could be a life saver but might encourage reckless driving in the wrong hands.

IE: the 4WD vehicles in the ditch at the first sign of snow.
 

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RonKZ650 wrote:
The ABS in my 97 F350 Ford has darn near caused an accident 50 times or more. Roads are slick and/or I wasn't watching close enough and need to make a quick stop. Apply the brakes a little too hard, braking action as expected, then the wheels begin to lock, the computer instantly releases all brake pressure for about 1 second. I could be wrong at the 1 second, but it's long enough where no braking whatsover is happening and scary as all heck. I'd much rather modulate my own brakes. ABS is like anything automatic, it is always better manual if you have the proper skills. How does the ABS work on these 1800s? Much better than Ford does I pray.
Ford is a ............ will not say it. I had a ford F350 also. I tow a Kubota L39 backhoe many times. I know exactly what you are saying. Mine did it too. I was so gunshy I would slow down way back!! Glad that truck is gone.

My Chevy does not do that, it works very well.

Have found out also that wagoner brake pads are not any good, they do not stop like OEM ones. Tried to save a buck......but they do not stop well.

Kit
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
:waving:Hey CJ:


I have read so many times by people who think they know, that if you practice braking with regular brakes you will always do what you are trained to do. Well not this boy, when your heart gets in your throat and the adrenalin flows, your very first reaction, right or wrong is to hammer that rear brake. That is life, that is what happens in the real world. You realize almost instantly that you just did the wrong thing, but by then you are in recovery mode. It is just what happens.

That was the reason I bought the wing. All the rest was just a bonus, quite a nice one, but is was for safety that I bought it, the brakes and the power to take an escape route if need be.

Kit
The old 1990 BMW I have has ABS. As has been said i havn't had it activate on the road yet. I have tested it several times though. Once going across the yard I pushed real hard on the rear brakes. I was surprised when I didn't lock up the wheel. It made a terrible clanging noise,( sound of the first generation ABS) and stopped upright. Then I bit the bullet so to speak and did the same thing with the front brake. Same thing. Just slowed to a stop. I also tried it on the road while it was wet from about 30 mph. Both wheels refused to slide. I am sold. If I ever come upon that panic situation where I simply apply both brakes full on out of fear I know the ABS will prevent me from sliding and going down. I think ofABS as insurance. Hope you never use it but glad it is there if you do...
 

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A lot of early implementations of ABS on pick-ups only had it in the rear, and they were pretty sorry. My ex-DIL's had a 93 with ABS on rear, and that was one sorry piece of engineering. And, always needing attention. He finally got a 89 system, (Why???), and had that installed by a local shop in his town. Said it was fine after that. He sure loved that Cummins, tho. Too much weight in the front, not enough at the rear, is my take.

On the 1800, I love how the ABS works, and I imagine in a nano-second situation, I'll be glad I have it. I've tried it at 20-30 from pavement right out into loose gravel, with full hard application, and I gotta say, it works very well. Tried a K BMW, and it worked the same way. Another reason American manufacturing seems to be losing. GRRRR

Buttttt, they're still no substitute for common sense. I do think common sense is almost dead. If one happens upon a sheet of black ice, for instance, :action: the ABS isn't going to be our saviour. :gunhead:
 

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Every once in awhile I "test" my ABS on both my Ford F150 and now my Goldwing. Usually lower speed stuff on gravel, sand or snow - just to make sure they do what they say. They do. Used them for real a few times on my ex-wife's car when I lived in snow country and other out of control cagers had to be avoided in emergencies.

They biggest adjustment is if you have a lot of riding experience without them you most likely know not to lock them up. It is hard to "trust them" and "crank like a mother" when you need to. Despite the natural tendencies to crank on them - some learned tendencies make it hard to do.

I find they work better if you are not timid with them - when you need them - apply them. If they vibrate, make noise or kick back - keep applying them - they work.
 

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While I agree that there is no replacement for experience(you do need some driving talent and common sense)a properly performing ABS(4 Wheel ABS,not rear wheel ABS)is like emergency braking for dummies.Crap tires,cheap pads and just generally poor maint. of the base brake system with affect the ABS performance.This is where I think that people that claimed to have a bad experience with ABS comes from.What I meant about braking for dummies is that in an emergency braking situation all you have to do is plant your foot hard on the brake pedal(keep the pressure on) and concentrate on steering and not on pumping the pedal.2 things with ABS 1 is that the wheels won't lock and 2 is that when the front wheels don't lock you can still steer the vehicle.I know this is more about 4 wheels,but I think if people could get there hands on a video of how an ABS system works and had a better understanding of it they would change there mind about it.Being an auto-tech for a large G.M. Dealer for 15 years I've had the chance to attend training courses on a few different(Bosch,Delphi etc.)ABS systems and there is no doubt in my mind that no matter what surface,2 or 4 wheels you've got a far better chance at keeping control with a properly maintained ABS sys.Sorry for the rant,but this is not JMHO.

P.S.If your ABS fails completely guess what?you're back to a normal brake system so you can pump til your hearts content.
 

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The larger Harleys now have optional ABS.

My riding buddy has a 2003 Valk and he did a panic stop.
His front tire skidded for 2 feet and the bike went down.
At 40 MPH a two foot skid happens in less than a tenth of a second.
If he would of had ABS, he would not have gone down.
This months "Rider" magazine covers the benefits of ABS.
Until weight is transferred to the front wheel, you can't apply the front brake fully.
 

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These stupid Ford trucks soured me so bad on ABS, just the mere mention of it makes me sick. Too bad, as it sounds like it actually works. It doesn't on the rear only ABS on the trucks, a deathtrap.
 

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tanygaer wrote:
ABS does not replace Good Technique, I have it, ithas never deployed, I hope my Good Technique keeps it unused, BUT in the event that it is required I may be glad of it....
Yep, agree with that, but on the day you get it wrong (and every once in a while you do) it might just save your bacon.

I know that mine works. And when it did, I was mighty pleased about it. :)
 

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jbivens544 wrote:
Until weight is transferred to the front wheel, you can't apply the front brake fully.
When you apply the front brake fully, you will overload the front tire by transferring too much weight.
 
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