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A lot of factors were left out of that article. Of course an older person is going to sustain more severe injuries in the same circumstances but that does not mean older people are more likely to have an accident. Also I see a lot of older inexperienced riders on cruisers with no riding gear other than a leather vest, boots and fingerless gloves.
 

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I just love these proclamations that consist of raw numbers, conjecture and anecdotal accounts.

This quote especially got my attention. ...“it’s interesting to note that the number of injuries in older riders is increasing every five years, it seems like.

Its seems like? I'm going to junk my bike based on that comment. I don't want another to get hurt on it based in a seems like.

Naturally, older riders are going to account for more injuries. There are more older riders. The article gives no percentages. It is only raw numbers which actually account for nothing. The writer's bias is very apparent. I talk to many people that will not get on a motorcycle, have never been on a motorcycle and won't in the future. They are frightened by the universal dissemination of FUD.

I would say that there should be a law against such biased and incomplete reporting but we have too many laws already.
 

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This article is so frought with false conclusions it amazes me that it was even published. Not to mention missing factors that may be correlational but not the root cause.

Could it be there are more inexperienced older riders? You know, guys and gals that decide they want a Harley at the young age of 55, even though they never rode a day in their life? Add to that, I would argue that as we age, it is easier to suffer more injuries for similar accidents than when we were in our 20's.

What about factoring in safety gear usage? How many of the accidents were not caused by the bike rider, rather a cager not paying attention? :lash:
 

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Like many here I rode in my teens and 20s I consider myself I far safer rider at 60 than back in the day ..if I rode like I did in my youth ....well that's a scary thought:shock: ... the news article is not the whole story ..there is no substitute for experience ..if you don't have it ..take a course
drive smart be safe
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Older riders are going to account for more accidents-injuries. There are more older riders, and they don't say anything about who hit who. I do think people should think long and hard before getting a bike when they have never had one, too many think it is easy to just buy one and go riding and don't ride in their ability!
 

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Hard as I try, the wife ain't going down no matter how old she gets.
 

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I recall seeing that people that ride full dress bikes are less likely to be involved in a crash with another motor vehicle.

Not saying the above is false, but numbers can be twisted.


Bill
 

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The #s increase every 5 years, because the average age of motorcyclist increases 5 years as well. Duh... The biker population is not increasing, just getting older. Not that many younger are getting into the fun. (not counting scooters) Pretty soon it will be almost 100% of the older riders are having the accidents. lol
 

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When I first started out, I rode a small scooter. Having 0 experience in riding, I took a friend's misfortune as a lesson-his first bike was glide, lasted 2 weeks and he ended up in the hospital fighting for his life. I learned a lot from that scooter, including the difference between front brakes and rear brakes:). A lot has happened since then, mainly I got older. With that came experience. And knowledge. Biking is a great experience, it teaches you to be keenly more observant and that transfers to driving a cage, when you HAVE to during the winter (in some states). Because of this, I believe all drivers must have to learn how to ride a motorcycle before you get licensed even if you don't intend to ride. This opens up your eyes to both experience and gives cagers that reality that they don't know, that there are others out there besides them. At least that has been my lesson in life. When I drive, I am far more aware of motorcycles than I used to be before I rode em. All drivers should have this opportunity-to be wary of thoughtless cagers who don't understand what a motorcycle is. Of course, there would be more bikes out there since once you get on one, there's no looking back:jumper:
Just sayin'
 

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I think the most important thing will be to know when it is time to stop riding.
We all age differently, so to this point, age is just a number.
Over all physicial aging and ability is something totally different.
I hope I realize when it is time to down size or stop riding.
Just a thought from an aging rider.:waving:
 

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I just love statistics. You can do so much with them. You just have to use the ones you want to prove your point. You aren't exactly lying. I mean, the numbers are there to support the conclusion. Then just vaguely describe it and you are golden. Next step is to apply for the next grant to do the followup study. Repeat.
 

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Hard as I try, the wife ain't going down no matter how old she gets.
Thank you Rudy. That's where my mind went when I read the title of this thread. Until your post, I thought I was the only one.
 

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Aren't we all "ageing bikers" ? I don't like the other option AT ALL !


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I've noticed that my survival instinct kicks in much sooner than it used to 40 years ago, but I can see where this statistic may be true... Many more of us out there now than there used to be!
 

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Another factor to consider is; as we age, our reflexes may slow down and we may no longer be able to react in time, when a cager wrongs us.

A few months ago, I had a very close scrape with an errant station wagon. My reflexes and training worked well and no one was hurt, but there may come a time when my relexes are compromised...
...Afterall, I'm soon to celebrate my 30th birthday.
For the 35th time!
 
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