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If you glue the pin on the float valve, then you can check the floats with the carbs laying flat...right?

I have a float valve that doesn't seem to want to seal anyway, so why can't I put some kind of glue on the pin so it won't depress,then move it from carb to carb, checking float height?
 

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The problem I can see doing that is that you have no way to be sure how accurately the needle seats have been cut. It only takes a few thousanths of an inch difference to change the needle cut off point. Likewise different torque on the seats or a variation in the sealing washer thickness. Then there's the fact that the needles in use may not be worn the same amount. I don't think using the same needle solid or not is a viable way to set the float height, it really isn't all that much more difficult to set them with the carb rack set vertically.
 

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...could work. What's wrong with standing them up?
 

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Also the valve hieght might vary between valve's it wouldn't take much variance to thro things off a bunch
Wilf
 

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...well, the way I do it is to up-end the rack on wichever side I'm working on and put enough tilt to it so that the floats brass bracket "just touches" the pin, then I measure and adjust as necessary to the manuals height from the carbs bowl gasket flange. I'll rock it back and forth a few times and recheck to see if the measurement remains the same.

Laying 'em down flat with a glued pin sounds like it would work to me, but the above is what I do...

Now, ...lets assume the floats themselves are all equal in weight and buoyancy. The above would work just fine. If the floats have any variance in either weight or buoyancy, then a measure of fuel height in the bowl is the next approach. This is how most other carbs are set anyway. The floats are adjusted to actual fuel height in the bowl and not to a specified assembled height. I've yet to do this on a GL though. I haven't found it necessary so far, ...but could be the way to go...? ...
 

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If you really wnt to get fussy try this Dennis. I will leave you to your own devices but here is the scheme.

Find a way to mount the carb in a vice etc. With the float open use a tube to blow in the carb fuel inlet. Slowly rotate the carb while blowing until the needle and seat cuts your breath off. Cinch the carb carefully a little more at that point and measure. That should be more perfect than necessary.

Now, go drive yourself nuts! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
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Well, as usual I couldn't duplicate a float position, and gluing the pin didn't seem to work because the whole valve moved in and out so freely. But after checking, and checking and checking several more times I think I determined that the guy at Old School Carbs had set the floats too low, and that would be consistent with the symptoms. (it had no top end power and would ping very badly at high rpm with full throttle)

The floats in theoriginal carbs were fairly new and seemed to be set a lot closer to 7.5 mm, so I put those in the new carbs. We'll see if it helps. First I have to locate the cotter pins, and upon close inspection I realized the Old School guy left the nylon washers out of the linkage, so I have to try and find 4 of those, as well.

:baffling:This shouldn't be this hard.
 

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The thing is Dennis, you can't put floats from 1 carb into another and expect it to be right.
 

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Yeah, I know Dave. But the level looked pretty good if I held the carbs just right and there is just so much guesswork involved that I took my best guess. I did have to adjust one float to match the others.

 

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No guesswork involved. Hold the carbs just past verticle (either way, floats pointing up or down) where the float tang rests on the pin and measure the level.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
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I don't know what I'm doing differently, but I can't really get the pins to stay in place. I can check the float height and then depress and release the float and the height will be different. Without changing the angle of the carbs. And if the carb angle changes by 2 degrees, then all bets are off.
 

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Dennis i tried both ways and ended up proping them up on the bench at the rite angle so the floats hung just enough to touch the pin and being sure the float valve was pushed in and seated without depressing the pin. Then i used my home made gauge to set them. Must have done well, it's running great.

Hope this helps! Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #14
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Jim, I have never been able to find that spot where the valve is fully seated and the needle not depressed. I don't think it's that critical though.
When I put the new floats in the original carbs, I didn't even try to set them and it ran great. When I started having float trouble with those carbs was after the GL guru worked on them.
BTW, '86 is supposed to be set @ 7mm. All other years @ 7.5
 

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I saw Haynes said 7.5 and Clymer says 7. They are set at 7.5 so i guess .5 mm is not that cridical since it's running great and commuting mileage is in the high 30's mpg. Have not checked the plugs since i set the mixture screws a 2 turns.


Jim
 
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