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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think that the road crews that do the painting of the lines and such should use a specially mixed paint that has some type of sand or other substance in it so that it is not so slippery. I don't beleive that the cost of the paint would go up very much but I KNOW the safety factor for everyone would go up dramatically. It seems like such an easy solution to an ever present problem.
 

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Village Whack Job...
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Having worked with traffic paint maybe I can shed some light on the subject.

The paint already contains pulverized glass, that's what makes it reflective. Adding sand would make it very difficult to put through a sprayer. The costs would go up more than you think. The equipment used for painting lines would not handle sand added to the paint. So it would all have to be replaced in order to spray sanded paint.

The other option would be to add the sand after the paint is sprayed. This means trucking it in, cleaning up the excess. As well as the diminished reflective effect which would mean adding more glass to the paint again costing more money.

The bottom line is that the benefits do not outweigh the expense.
 

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Gregarious Greeter
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Paint does not really bother me much compared to the tar and chip that is put on the roads. Now there is a real hazard. Been a lot of that going on around our home, and it sure increases the pucker factor. They have also started just patching areas along the side of the road with asphalt making it uneven and dangerous to travel. Be careful out there in your travels.
 

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Junior Grue
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Paint does not really bother me much compared to the tar and chip that is put on the roads.
I don't know how they're doing crosswalks where you live but here they're using wide strips parallel to the direction of travel which doesn't present a problem when going straight through as you can go between them but the pucker factor when doing a turn over them in the rain can pull your seat into your throat.
 

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ɹoᴉuǝS ɯoʇsnƆ
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Also, seems to me, if they reduced the width of the lines by 1/2, you would still be able to see them just fine, spend 1/2 the amount of time on the line, use 1/2 as much paint.
Just sayin'.
 

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Junior Grue
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Also, seems to me, if they reduced the width of the lines by 1/2, you would still be able to see them just fine, spend 1/2 the amount of time on the line, use 1/2 as much paint.
Just sayin'.
You do know you're talking about the same people that can't see your Goldwing from ten feet away.:readit:
 

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Gregarious Greeter
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I don't know how they're doing crosswalks where you live but here they're using wide strips parallel to the direction of travel which doesn't present a problem when going straight through as you can go between them but the pucker factor when doing a turn over them in the rain can pull your seat into your throat.
I live in the country where there are no painted cross walks and I would not ride in the city if you paid me. Never gave cross walks a thought in my answer, because I never see them. My bad.:waving:
 

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I can tell you being on a bicycle with those lines being wet can sometimes be a nightmare also.
 
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