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I have a 98 Honda se. The alternator went this spring it was 9 years old. I put a new one in that lasted about 7 or 8 hundred mile. Ok thought maybe got a bad one. Returned it and they gave me a new one. Same thing happened 7 8 hundred miles pretty unlikely I got two bad ones. Any ideas what could be blowing the alternator. Sorry for such the long post Just wanted to explain. Thanks in advance.
 

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Alternator went this spring it was 9 years old I can live with that. Put a new one in lasted about 7 8 hundred miles. That one went ok thought I got a bad one returned it and they were good enough to replace it. Same thing happened 7 8 hundred miles it went again pretty unlikely got two bad ones. Any ideas? Thanks in adVance.
 

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Are the alternators new or "rebuilt?" Did you find out what part of the alternator was failing?

I had a similar situation with my 99. Those alternators had a reputation for failed rotors. There are two ways to make the connection between the windings and the commutator. That connection can be crimped or soldered. Soldered is the way to go but yours is crimped. If you get a rebuilt many times the rebuilder will try to repair the failed connection and it just doesn't hold up well.

I actually had 3 failed rebuilds. Managed to get a refund from the rebuilder and replaced new. It has been 8 or 10 years of going strong.
 

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Are the alternators new or "rebuilt?" Did you find out what part of the alternator was failing?

I had a similar situation with my 99. Those alternators had a reputation for failed rotors. There are two ways to make the connection between the windings and the commutator. That connection can be crimped or soldered. Soldered is the way to go but yours is crimped. If you get a rebuilt many times the rebuilder will try to repair the failed connection and it just doesn't hold up well.

I actually had 3 failed rebuilds. Managed to get a refund from the rebuilder and replaced new. It has been 8 or 10 years of going strong.
They were both new. I know the ones from China are prone to go but two new ones.
 

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Never had 2 new ones fail prematurely. If they won't give you a warranty I would open it up and find out what failed.

You could easily check the rectifier if still on the bike. Just take your voltmeter on AC (yes AC) and check across the battery terminals; with the bike running. On the AC scale a good alternator will read less than .10/ (point 10 volts AC) The alternator circuit is so simple there is not a ;lot to look at the bikes end. One wire from ignition switch and one to the battery. One turns on the regulator with the key and the big one carries the power to the battery. Make sure they are in good shape. Gig the bike have any other anomalies? Dead batteries etc?
While you have the meter on the battery switch to DC. What is the voltage and is it creeping up ot down?
 

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Never had 2 new ones fail prematurely. If they won't give you a warranty I would open it up and find out what failed.

You could easily check the rectifier if still on the bike. Just take your voltmeter on AC (yes AC) and check across the battery terminals; with the bike running. On the AC scale a good alternator will read less than .10/ (point 10 volts AC) The alternator circuit is so simple there is not a ;lot to look at the bikes end. One wire from ignition switch and one to the battery. One turns on the regulator with the key and the big one carries the power to the battery. Make sure they are in good shape. Gig the bike have any other anomalies? Dead batteries etc?
While you have the meter on the battery switch to DC. What is the voltage and is it creeping up ot down?
Thanks Mike I will check all that latter today. The wire going to the ignition I do have crimped not soldered but taped up good and zip tied. I going to have to have it rebuilt any way. I mean I’m 99% sure it’s not putting out anything I’ve been though this three times now lol acting the same every time. When I find out what went in the alternator I will post.Thanks you very much
 

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Are these OEM or an aftermarket 40A? The late model SE's have more lights going on than earlier models and are very hard on alternators due to the increased current draw. The 40A alternator is constantly full fielding generating excess heat trying to keep up never being able to reach a decent charging voltage. Put a CompuFire in and be done with it.
 

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One of my riding friends had 4 alternators fail on his 2000 Gold Wing SE in the first 15,000 miles.

They were all replaced under warranty by Honda.

He finally got a good one.....!!

My 1999 Gold Wing SE had one of the good alternators. I replaced the brushes at 120,000 miles then the rotor finally failed at 150,000 miles.

Installed a rebuilt alternator and it was still working good when I sold the bike at 222,903 miles.
 

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I agree that most 1500 alt’s go because of the rotor, I have a few of them sitting here, my rebuild shop was looking for a rotor years ago, but never did find a replacement rotor.
 

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Blowing a regulator is not uncommon. Either replace the regulator in the alternator you have or replace the alternator. There is very little possibility that an external device blew the regulator.
 
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That is a very simple system. When you bolt the alternator in the motor spins the alternator. It needs 12 volts via the small wire from the ignition switch to turn on the regulator, The output voltage comes from the big stud and goes to the battery. That is it. :)
 
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