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Hi guys, i will apologise in advance for yet again raising an old topic, but have searched previous posts, and would like reassurance and advice from experienced 1500 riders.
My '93 1500A "project" is nearly ready for dismantling again for painting, and would have got a couple of final jobs out of the way, but one remains unanswered for me. The front suspension is quite "firm",(have 15w Med/Heavy (Motul) in them as advised by my local shop) and having been used to a more "bouncy" GL1200 and very happy with it, would like a similar feel on the 1500 if possible. I am using 10w (Motul) in my 1200. I have (in the 1500)progressive rear shocks fitted (stickers attached to them), but don't know if fitted to the front....how would I know and is it relevant?. I have put the quantity of oil in each side as per Clymer manual, no air added at this stage, and I think that if I drained them and put similar quantity of 10w in them, would this help?...or perhaps I am missing the point completely?
Happy to remove the forks again if necessary to drain and clean out the old oil, or if draining via the bolts forks on is o/k, then i'll go that way, would just like to get it right.
Many thanks,...........
 

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Other side of the pond
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15W oil is fine. A hard front end means you either have Progressive springs in there, or too much oil.
 

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The Irish Crew
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My Davis is to get used to the firmness. The 1500 Goldwing front end can handle very badly if you have it too soft.
 

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Pwhoever
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If youcan geta look at the front fork springs, itshould beeasy to tell. Progressives are one piece springs and are tightly wound only on one side. I don't have experience on the GL1200 riding feel but the GL1500's can be kind of firm. My preference is 10W with my Progressive springs and no air. One of the biggest factors besides weight of fork oil is the level. If you have uneven levels or too much, you will just get a lousy ride. Slightly reducing the level on both sides if it seems too firm can help make the ride less harsh but you don't want to reduce it too much. Using the fork bolt air valve, it is a breeze to change the oil and refill it. The key is to not make a big deal about the volume/amount of oil in each fork. Each side will contain a different amount but the level below the lip of the top of the fork should be the same in both sides. And just some further info, no air really doesn't mean there is no air in the fork. It just means that the pressure should be 0 psi when the forks are fully extended. You can read this thread for more info: Getting the level right
 

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Thanks heeps guys for the info, the "getting the level right" thread is just what I was looking for.
Many thanks,..........:)
 
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