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Discussion Starter #1
So I just bought a 1985 aspen with a bad stator (didn't know it was bad till 2 days later) is the poorboy solution still around to buy? Or am I stuck trying to do this new stator route where it could fail the second I start the bike? I never owned a old bike or had to work on them. Only ever new bikes..

Yamaha FZ07 2016 , MT09 2019 etc. What am I getting I to.. I paid 2000$ CAN for it.. 126k kms it looks amazing everything works but stator.

Give it to me straight.
 

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Probably a nice bike but you might have paid a little too much/ Especially knowing what you know now. Many have built there own poorboy for very little money. If you don't need fancy it doesn't have to take that long. Once you get that done you will love your bike. :)
 

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It might just be the wires that really need soldered going to the stator or the regulator.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Already has the 3 wire together. Removed connector. Any walk through of the poorboy ? What may be needed to mount it? I can do the stator if needed. Just where to buy since there are so many options.
 

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You MUST do a good check of the stator. Lots of poor boys done when the stator itself was fine.

I personally hate the poor boy fix. I've never seen one I thought was well done. So, if your stator is toast, have it rebuilt at a location near you. Easy, fast and cheap. And you can spin the motor enough to get the stator out, without dragging it out of the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did the test 1) 1.67v 2) 4.6v 3)4.5v off the yellow wires directly from stator at 3000rpm :cry: battery brand new after 3 hours of riding battery at 11.4v

I'd love.to just be able to spin it if possible.
 

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I did the test 1) 1.67v 2) 4.6v 3)4.5v off the yellow wires directly from stator at 3000rpm :cry: battery brand new after 3 hours of riding battery at 11.4v

I'd love.to just be able to spin it if possible.
Not a good test there. I mean, you didn't do it right. You'll need to separate the three wires and test AC voltage (it is an alternator) at 3,000 rpm or more a-b, b-c, c-a. There are detailed test posts here, just search. I did my stator in 1998, just sold the bike last year, still healthy. I used a Honda stator. I also replaced the plug with new plug from Honda soldering the places wires were crimped by connectors & pack with dielectric grease.
322920
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wires already been removed from the connector and soldered . I am confused I did the exact test shown from Saunders videos
and I am getting the same kind of results.
 

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David Silver spares now has a US wharehouse and does a good stator, dont forget the gasket, O rings and rubber plug where wires exit.

You have to disconnect everything to spin it so may as well lower it and make it safe
 

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Try this one...

"Stator Test
1- First, put the bike on the centerstand. Cut the wires on both sides of the stator connector plug. Strip the insulation aprox. 1/2"-1" back on all three yellow wires. Label each wire A, B, and C.
2- With a multimeter, digital or analog, set to read resistance, check each leg to ground for short's. If no short's are found, (o resistance), you're good to go so far.
3- With the meter set to read resistance, check across each leg. A to B, B to C, then C to A. The reading's should be about 3 ohm's. If you read infinite resistance across any of the legs you have an open winding and the stator is bad. If they read good, keep going.
4- A helper is good to have for this next step. With the battery fully charged and the three yellow wire's separated so they cannot make contact, crank the bike. Have your helper rev the bike to 3000rpm after the bike warm's up.
IMPORTANT!!!
You are checking for AC voltage NOT DC voltage!! Make sure the meter is set to read a minimum of 120vac!!
With the bike at 3000rpm, check leg A to B. Note the voltage.
Then check leg B to C. Note the voltage.
Finally check leg C to A. Note the voltage.
Compare the three readings. They should be between 50-70vac plus or minus about 5vac per leg. If they read good, chances are you've got a bad regulator."
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Am I reading all 3 legs on the stator side while engine is running? Will the bike run without the stator powering anything? The 3 wires from stator side go to rectifier I assume? Sorry for all the questions.
 

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Am I reading all 3 legs on the stator side while engine is running? Will the bike run without the stator powering anything? The 3 wires from stator side go to rectifier I assume? Sorry for all the questions.
Yes, the battery will run it.
 

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Wires already been removed from the connector and soldered . I am confused I did the exact test shown from Saunders videos
and I am getting the same kind of results.
That test doesn't work. I tried it on a known bad stator and it showed to be good. The AC voltage test is the only reliable way. You can do it at the regulator plug (disconnected) if you don't want to cut the wires.
 

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I see. I will try it out.. so I would cut these wires just to be 100% sure View attachment 322921
Yes. Since the wires have already been cut try removing the tape and see what's there. That might be your problem if the stator tests good... Read my post again: With the engine OFF you are checking for continuity between the wires, about 1-3 ohms, and then shorts to ground.. With the engine RUNNING, you are checking for AC Voltage. MAKE SURE the wires are clear of any ground points!!!!!!

Let us know what you find!!

Edit: After looking at the pic some more it appears at least one of the wires have been replaced going to the regulator. If it were me, I'd pull the fake tank cover and inspect the regulator/rectifier connector. You'll need to do that anyway because if the stator tests good, the connector there is the next area you'll need to look at for burning...

This ain't the first time we've been down this road!! Everything I'm posting I have done to my bike as have a lot of the other posters!! Be patient and we'll get there!!
 

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I never even bothered with an ohm test, the AC voltage tells all you need to know. If a person had a megohm tester that would be the best way.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Need pics of your bike. Lots of good advice and information on this forum.
Sheepskin.jpg


Depending on your location in Canada depends on the price you pay for these older bikes. If the stator is bad, you can replace or do an external alt mod, and the install of the external alt mod if you take your time can look very good. I've attached a picture of the left side of my '85 and you will be hard pressed to notice that there is an alt mod unless I told you. I have the '85 1200 engine out for a rebuild, and can send pictures of the mounting brackets I made for the external alt mod and dimensions if you would like.

If you take the engine out to do a stator replacement, replace the sprague clutch bits, or at least clean up that area. Check the clutch itself. Won't hurt to look at the steel plates to see if these were overheated or not. I know that these clutches last a long time, but if you are going to keep the bike a new set of friction plates wouldn't hurt.

You can keep the costs down by doing a lot of research on the internet, and by being your own mechanic. You do need the OEM service and the Electrical Troubleshooting manuals. These will answer a lot of your questions.

Older bikes are not inexpensive to own. Unless you have had the same bike for years, there will be an upfront cost to get the bike safely on the road, then the issues that will come up as you own it, generally in the soon after you bought it time frame.

I would recommend doing some initial maintenance such as:

Timing belts (first on everyone's list when buying a used older GW)
Change all the fluids - clutch/brake/coolant
Brake pads - brake pads do deteriorate with age, new can't hurt
Air compressor - tucked up in the fairing. Desiccant will need to be changed/refreshed
Front fork oil change - good fall/winter work project
Rear spline lube - remove rear wheel, final drive, drive shaft, u-joint - inspect and lube with a suitable molybdenum product - I use Loctite LB 8012
Plugs, air/fuel filters, normal maintenance stuff

Doesn't matter which used older bike you get, there will always be work/maintenance to be done, but you can't beat the ride of the GW for touring or two up travel. Great for riding around town as well. I will mention that if you are going to do the work and try to recoup your investment probably won't happen.

Good luck with your project. You will enjoy the bike once you get this issue sorted out. It's not all doom and gloom, but we are in Canada and with that comes a definite price/cost disadvantage that our friends in the south don't have.

Cheers
 

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I never even bothered with an ohm test, the AC voltage tells all you need to know. If a person had a megohm tester that would be the best way.
It's more a test of continuity than a test for resistance Dave... And it's just one more way to find out what's wrong with the fool thing.....
 
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