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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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Many people charge as much as 600 bucks and more. That's if you remove the carbs yourself.
If you have the tools and time, you are probably better off doing the job yourself. The OEM rebuild kits are cheaper than aftermarket, and pulling the unit off the bike is the hardest part of the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know much about bikes as a new rider so I appreciate the input from both of you. I was hoping to get a motorcycle repair course in but it seems just as easy to look up videos on how to make the repairs. I'm not ready to pay out that much for repairs....I don't work on my own car anymore but think I'd enjoy working on my bike.
 

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It aint rocket science
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If you have the tools and time, you are probably better off doing the job yourself. The OEM rebuild kits are cheaper than aftermarket, and pulling the unit off the bike is the hardest part of the job.
The hard part is doing a correct rebuild and from reading the forums very few can get it right, not the kind of job a novice should begin with IMO.

To the OP What symptoms does the engine exhibit.
 

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The hard part is doing a correct rebuild and from reading the forums very few can get it right, not the kind of job a novice should begin with IMO.
+1
The 1200 carbs are very forgiving. There aren't a whole lot of parts, but over and over again, we see posts of clean carbs, that weren't clean. Float levels that weren't set. Aftermarket parts that are incorrect for year and model. And owners that just don't know what they are looking at.
Correct me if I'm wrong Dennis, but you have post after post about your carbs not working correctly, removing them multiple times, and at one point, someone else rebuilt a set for you?
Not quite the cakewalk you claim them to be.
If you do them yourself, get the Randakk kit, and the video/manual and do it RIGHT. You can't take short cuts with carbs and expect decent results.

And as DriverRider asked, why do you want to rebuild the carbs? Do you have a driveability issue?
 

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It aint rocket science
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The bike is running a little rough and an experienced rider said the carbs need cleaning.
An experienced mechanic (me):) recommends a compression test if the bike is new to you or has an unknown history. Saves a lot of potential problems down the road with good money thrown after bad and takes but a few minutes.

Then a sound diagnostic routine for ignition and carb troubles with checking plug condition and finding any vacuum leaks and fuel delivery problems. You want to know which cylinder is running rich or lean prior to removing rack to give clues as to what direction that individual carb needs to be repaired.

So you want to be a mechanic? Plenty of help here to tell you what to do.
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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+1
Correct me if I'm wrong Dennis, but you have post after post about your carbs not working correctly, removing them multiple times, and at one point, someone else rebuilt a set for you?

My original carbs were acting up and I took them to a local guy who didn't do anything to help, so he wanted the bike and that's when he messed the carbs up so much that I ended up buying a set from e-bay.
Those I sent to Old School Carbs in California and that guy messed up the new carbs so badly the bike would hardly run.
I sent them back but it didn't help. He wanted them back again and I decided to figure it out myself.
They're still not right but are better. I think an idle drop may help, now that I have a new pump.
Anyway, that's why I think someone is better off doing the work himself.
 

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I don't work on my own car anymore but think I'd enjoy working on my bike.
I'm sure you would. And if you have any experience at all, you can pull it off with all the help you'll get from this forum.

Listen: If I can do it, anyone can do it. I had zero mechanical ability, zero experience and had the reputation with my family of being a Mr. F_xit (and that's not Fixit.)

But with the help of this Board, I rebuilt the carbs with Randakk's kit quite successfully. Had 'em in and out a few times, but we got it finished and gained 5-6 mpg to boot.

My vote is for giving it a try. You can always send them to Pistol Pete if you have to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Pete. I have the confidence to do it myself but don't want to end up damaging anything. I will take it for the tests and see what they say. I will also look into Randakks kit if it comes down to me doing it myself. Will let you know how it goes when I find out in a couple of weeks. Good to see you're local.
 

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As a NEW GL1200 owner myself... I did a carb rebuild myself. I used the Randakk kit.

I'm not 'legally' a mechanic.. But, I DO like wrenching on cars (and now bikes). Here are a few things I found to be challenging as a newbie:

1) Getting the Carb assembly out of the bike in the first place. For me it didn't quite fit out of the left side of the bike. It's a tight fit. (interference with fairing nut)
2) Disconnecting the 4 vapor ports along side each intake (Maybe these things are only on CA bikes.. because I don't see many posts about how hard they are to get off without scratching stuff up.
3) Keeping track of the freaking nightmare of vacuum/fuel lines on the carbs underbelly. Again, maybe this is just on CA bikes.
4) Sequence of attaching throttle/choke cables prior to re-installing.
5) All the other details of keeping springs and parts together and remembering where they all go.
6) MAKE SURE THE GAS TANK IS CLEAN FIRST! (for me, I missed that first step completely, and rust crumbs messed up my freshly rebuilt carbs!)

I know my second time around would be a million times easier! One single piece of advice I'd add to the others is TAKE A LOT OF PICTURES, from many angles. (this was the only thing that saved me when it came to getting all the vacuum lines and hoses connecting the right things together.)

I don't regret doing it myself, it was challenging.. But, REALLY fun!
 
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