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Finally got a 1984 interstate. (wanted one for years) it has 22,000
miles. has been sitting for 3 years. The oil that came out
of it is black. Ive read some posts that suggest flushing the crank
case with kerosene. Is flushing the crankcase as easy as pouring in the
kerosene and draining it out, or is there something I have to do to get
any residual kerosene out of there before I add the new oil? I had
planned on changing all the fluids, oil, coolant, brake fluids, and
the all filters, then riding it for the summer. But after reading
some posts about upgrading the wiring harness to the stator and
changing the timing belts if over six years old I'm afraid to drive the
dang thing. I had planned on doing all that this winter since our
season is so short. also the bike is pretty clean but there is
alot of oil film and dirt builup around the shifter shaft, above the
shift shaft on the bottom of the head, and down the side of the motor
and extends under the motor and on the oil pan. looks pretty thick
around thr shift shaft though. Does anyone know if this is a problem
area on the 1200 and maybe what I should be looking for?
thank you for your help.
 

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You should definatley solder the stator harness connectors if they haven't already been done. I would also check all the other electrical connectors for corrosion.

The shifter has a small rubber oring seal that is easily replaced. You may have to remove a couple of things to get at it. The shifter itself has to come off and then you can pry out the rubber seal. Pick another one up for a couple bucks and then seat it with a socket the same size.

As far as flushing the engine, most put a quart of MMO marvel mystery oil in it (not overfilling the crank case) and give it a short run. This will thin out the oil so don't over do it. Then drain and replace with fresh.

The belts aren't really that hard. While your changing the antifreeze (with silicate free), just pop out the radiator and then change them. Much easier.

Be sure to change the fuel filter and check out the inside of the tank. It might have a bunch of krud in the bottom. Easiest way is to drain the tank, remove the seat and then remove the fuel level sensor and then take a look inside with a flash light.

I'm sure others will be along to share their opions also. FYI, go get a good manual. They are always on ebay.

Ken
 

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Ken's advice was good. You can also use a little ATF, but if the oil is just black, you may wish to do a oil change, run it for 500 miles and change it again. As long as it doesn't have a lot of slugged, you should be ok. Since it has low mileage, but not a lot of use, do the basic maintenance. Oil, filter, coolant, differential fluid, lube cables and clean it up. As Ken said, you need to do the coolant anyway and flush the radiator. Do the timing belts at the same time.

As far as the build-up, I would degrease the engine first, do the oil change, check to make sure the coolant hasn't separated into oil, and if not go put a few miles on the bike and then recheck the leak. If the leak is from the water-pump, you can do it at the same time you are doing the timing belts. That's what I had done.

Have a great time with your new bike.

Jerry
 

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dburnash wrote:
Finally got a 1984 interstate. (wanted one for years) it has 22,000
miles. has been sitting for 3 years.
:waving::waving:Welcome to the Best Goldwing Site on the Internet, dburnash!:waving::waving:

Congratulations on your new bike and your good taste! It shouldn't take too long to do the basic maintenance needed, by all means get a manual, Clymers is available at Amazon and other sources, the Honda manual is best, Clymers second and Haynes third choice (IMNSHO). These are great bikes once you have everything in shape they just keep going and going like that damn pink bunny.
 

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If the bike has been sitting around a while, check the tire valves, give them a real hard side to side movement and check for cracks and perished rubber.
One thing bike shops don't do that auto shops do is change the valves at each tire change.
Not a nice feeling riding home very slowly an about 10lbs air pressure in the front wheel.
When I got home I tried to put air into the front tire and when I put the hose to the valve, it broke off.
From then on everytime I change a tire I tell them PUT A NEW VALVE IN:shock:

I just reached 189,000 K on my 85 Aspy doing a run around Lake Michigan and into Wisconsin, I just got to find a better way of getting back to the bridge to Canada in Detroit instead of the I75 :p
I know how the gladiators felt when facing the lions :) maybe I am getting too old but I prefer back roads.
 
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