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So I decide to take the bike to work today. Its a nice balmy 37 degrees but the sun is out. On goes the Gerbing jacket liner and glove liners and its off to work. About a mile and a half in, here come the clouds and a pretty good snow flurry follows.... Its too late to turn around and the traffic gets pretty so I continue. Its too warm so the snow can't stick on the ground but the pavement turns nice and wet. Now I get on the expressway for a couple miles and by the time I get off, the clouds have passed over, the snow has stopped, and the sun comes back out. And throughout this, the bike stuck to the pavement like glue. Yeah!!! Glad I got this car tire.... So now I hit city streets for the rest of the trip and I am about a block away from work stopped at a red light. The light changes green and off I go. Almost immediatelyI start hearing a tick,tick,tick but continue on till I get in the garage. The noise is coming from the rear tire so I put it up on the center stand and this is what I found:



Damn!!!!! Looking at the razor, I notice that it went straight across and was still even. I figured either way I'm going to have to take it out so I did. It actually came out pretty easy:



It made a nice cut across and I know there is absolutely no way to repair this. But amazingly there is no air leaking out so far. It looks like the steel radial belts stopped it from going completely in. I know that it would have probably gone clean through on a bias ply. It's kind of neat though because the radial belts mad grooves in the razor:



So now I have a question. There is no doubt that the tire needs to be replaced. However, right now it is not leaking any air. I really want to get this home to my garage as I feel more comfortable working on it there and have everything I need. And besides, I will have to order another tire online so it will take awhile and I don't really want to leave it at work for that length of time. The bike is now about 12 miles from home. So what are the chances that I might be able to drive it homeif I stay on city streets (no highway) and just take my time? I'm guessing that it might bubble out but going slow, I'm thinking that I should be ok with that. I just want to know how good my chances are that I could make it home......
 

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I'd stick to side roads , low speeds and have a backup plan, truck/trailer just in case . If your going to be riding in the snow you might want the tire I use . Wintersport ROF ;) Sorry you have to change the tar . It looks like it had bit life to give . :(
 

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The real question is, do you feel lucky? Well, do ya? I don't know man, that's one of those things that could make it just fine or go bad in a hurry. If it were me I'd probably try it, but I'd be checkin' that bugger at every stop light and keep it under 30.
 

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I would work a little late, Maybe walk around downtown a bit, get dinner, let the traffic die down. Then, as you suggest, ride it home. With the roads being cooler with the cooler weather Versus a 95 degree day with the sun beating down, I don't think your going to heat that tire up enough to cause a burst. Could also take 5 or 6 pound of air out of it just in case though.
 

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I think, as you said, I would ride the city streets taking it easy. I like the idea of having a trailer on standby just in case also. If it is still holding air when you get ready to leave, I would go for home with it.
 

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“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!”
― Hunter S. Thompson (Go for it! slowly!)
 

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I have absolutly no idea how that could have found it's way into your tire by accedent. Perhaps somelowlife set it up at the intersection

Wilf
 

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Pwhoever
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Yup, there was plenty of tread left and it is a shame. But at least I know that the Formoza is finally available again. And the steel belts came in real handy. It looks like everyone pretty much thinks like I do. I will drop the pressure and try to nurse it home at low speed on city streets. I will give an update sometime later after I get off of work and get home.
 

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I'd look close and hard at those steel belts/cords.
It's not the rubber that holds the tire together, it's the belts. The rubber holds the air.

If they look cut half in 2 or a few frayed/broke I'd be worried, I might try it but figure it could blow any second and be very careful and slow. If they look too bad I'd not risk it at all.

If steel belts/cords all look fine and you see nothing damaged but the outside rubber I'd go for it myself, carefully still of course.

When a tire explodes like the Firestones I had on a car, it's not because the rubber fails to hold air, it's because the belts break and fail to hold the tire together. BOOM, tire gone!

If your tire is not leaking air now, it probably won't unless something punctures it further than the cut. But if belts are damaged it could blow anytime!

I'm not saying you should ride it, or not ride it, just my opinion on tires as I know them and what I'd do.
It's your bike and life and you have to make the decision.
 

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It's kind of late for this reply because you are probably already on the road but I think Chromo hit the nail on the head.

The air is held in the tire by the inner most layer of rubber. So cut all the tread you like and it's highly unlikely you are going to leak air.

The belts will hold the tire together as long as they aren't compromised.

The biggest risk is that the tread layer might come off. It would start to peel from the split and then come offin a layer. It would look like a retread.If it came off slowly, it would start thumping and then start slapping your fender as it went around.That could cause a lot of damage.

But the split doesn't cross the entire tread, and theres still a lot of rubber holding it together. And the rubber is really "glued" to the belts very securly, so if the stress on the tire is light, it could easily hold well enough to get you home.

Check it frequently, stay off the interstate and ride gently. Pay attention to any warnings you might feel.

If it were me, I'd go for it.
 

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Just think how far you would have ridden if there had been no noise . :shock:
 

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My reply is way too late, but I wouldn't hesitate to just ride it home. And I would not let any air out. You need that carcass to stand up tall, not be whimpering and shivering because with low air pressure the side walls will have to give more.
 

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Heres the update. I always run the rear tire at 44psi but dropped it to 38psi just to relieve a little pressure which is stilldecent I think. I took the city streets all the way home. The one thing I did leave outwas that 2/3rds of my route take me through some of the most violent sections of Chicago. Shootings, stabbings, homicides, etc. occurring on almost a daily basis. And going through late at night you really don't want to get stranded. I really didn't want to have an issue on the way home but since it was almost unanimous in giving it a go, I figured that I could make it. I made it home about an hour ago. No problem. Once I got home, my S/O wanted to see it so I put it back up on the center stand. I even had to look real hard to find the damage as it had kind of closed up quite a bit. Doesn't matter, it's damaged goods and needs to be replaced. I feel a lot better having the bike home....

I did probably get the best gas mileage on that route that I have ever got. Did you know that taking an easy pace and not going above 35mph, you really never have to twist the throttle much more than 1/8th of a turn? Boy did that suck!!

Now on the plus side, I will get a chance to check the almost new AllBalls bearings on the rear to make sure they are fully greased up. And I might also even order the thrust washer mentioned by Satan in this post
 
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