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Hi

As part of putting my bike back together I am cleaning the wiring. The connectors have 26 years of muck in them and so far i have just sprayed them with an electrical cleaner.

Any tips regarding:
1. Actually taking the connectors apart
2. Whether the connectors should be packed with grease and if so what sort of grease - i have a lot of spray lithium grease would that be any good???
 

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Hello sheridat. The most critical connector is the one under the left side panel. The one connecting the alternator's three-phase output to the regulator. A loose connection here will cause the alternator's windings to fry. It was a major problem on just about ALL four cylinder wings. Cleaning and tightening these connectors is good. Removing the connectors and soldering the wires is better. I had to replace the alternator windings on both my 1000 and 1200 because of that connector's failure and it's an all day expensive repair. Any good light grease in the other connectors is good for all the rest of them. A shot of WD40 in each of the handlebar controls and the ignition switch twice a year really helps there to both lubricate and to clean out the muck as well. I assume you have WD40 in the UK but it's a light lubricant/solvent as well as a moisture displacent. There has to be something like it over there.
 

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I get good results using a high pressure "needle" tip from the air compressor, sprayed into the opened connector ends... This removes the old grease, debris, etc.

Then spray the inside with electrical contact cleaner...

Then air dry again...

Then pack the connector halves (both sides) with Di-electric Grease...

Then Assemble, and wipe away any obvious excess grease on the outside.
 

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Bullet connectors: Pull apart and clean the male with a strip of emery paper rolled between your fingers. Clean the female with a micro rat tail file. I got mine at Harbor Freight as part of a set of small files. Repack with dielectric grease.

Blade & block connectors: Pull apart and clean males with the flat file found in the file kit mentioned above. Same for the females. Repack with dielectric grease.

+1 on chopping out the connector block with the three yellow wires. You can find the block on the left side of the battery.
 

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sheridat wrote:
Any tips regarding:
1. Actually taking the connectors apart
I use a set of miniature picks. A large straight-pin, paperclip, sometimes a mini screwdriver (like for eyeglasses), etc.. works too.

Disassembly of wires/pins from connector housings is a good idea to a fresh start for any possible wiring woes in the future.

I'm a liker of WD-40 for this stuff. There is future maintenance when using lightweight lubricants in electrical connectors. Dirt will get back in there eventually. It'll take quite a while for it to happen though...
 

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I also saw someone on here recommended CLR - Calcium, Lime and Rust remover for bathroom cleaning. It has an acid in it that makes the connectors shiny new. Wash off with water and dry it off with an air hose.
 

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CLR will clean the connectors but I would worry what it would do to paint.

WD-40 and a smal paint brush, followed by some mild (plastic safe) contact cleaner and then dielectric grease to seal the deal.
 

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Hi Sheridat,



This thread I started back in July 09 should help you out. This process cleaned the connections fantastically and does not weaken them electrically (as if using abrasion methods) and is quite easy to do.



http://goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum1/73675.html



Hope it helps.



Tim.
 

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Older model OEM connectors were factory installed dry with no grease in them . They were also not " weather proof " with the seal that you find on connectors now.
The common problem is electrical corrosion that appears as a greenish colored deposit inside the connector .
A mixture of water and common baking soda will eat off this corrosion completely within minutes. Blow out the crap with comp. air . Inspect the now clean terminals for evidence of overheating and replace as needed.
Lightly pack the connectors with dielectric grease and you should be good to go.
 

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Add on ... the stator connector is a weak spot and should be cut out and hard wired as described by Tom.
Securley solder the wires together and use shrink tubes to insulate.
 
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