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After much research here and there... I did it. it took about 6hrs. total, but completely worth it.

My goals were a clean installation that you wouldn't see unless you were looking for it. I also didn't want to take any storage room away from the bike, and I didn't want to drill any holes or modify the bike in a way that I couldn't reverse.

There's 3 basic parts to the system, and they're all connected to the brains of the kit, the Servo. 1. the wires that control the servo. 2. a cable that connects to the throttle linkage. 3. a vacuum line that gives the Servo it's power.

1. The Wires: There's basically 4 things to do with the wires. There's power, a brake signal, an RPM signal, and connection to the controller on the handlebars. The easiest way to run this unit is off the coil. It can be set up to run off the wheel speed sensor, or you can use the magnets included to make your own signal, but the coil method is easy and proven. The Power can be easily tapped into on the fuse block on the ACC nut. Since the unit relies on vacuum for most of it's "grunt" the electrical power needed is super minimal. Even the backlights on the controller are LEDs. If you mount the Servo in the same spot as me, the brake light wires are right there. If you do use the "Coil" method that I used here, you can just clip the grey and (small) black wires from the wiring that would be for the wheel sensor.

2. Servo Cable: This is easily the hardest part of the kit, and requires that you think like an engineer to make it work right, and safely. There's literally thousands of ways you can do this...and I'd bet that every install is going to be a little different. I tried to keep the cable routed as straight as possible, and the linkage to the throttle as simple as possible. Make sure that you turn the twist grip throttle over and over to make sure that it's never going to bind up or cause anything to stick. You want it set up so that you can easily over-ride the system if you have to.

3. Vacuum: because our bikes don't produce the massive amounts of vacuum that a car does, you need to build or buy a small tank to accumulate vacuum. I spent about $20 on the PVC pipe, the check valve, and some adapters. but it was easy and fun.



Here's a couple other guides that I read to help put my strategy together:

http://www.angelfire.com/il/sproulpage/page13.html

http://www.valkyrieriders.com/shoptalk/cruise-control.htm



unit from Amazon.com $89 usd.




bike with tupperware off.


location of servo.


barely can see it's there.




Purple wire connected to brake light.


all 3 power lines to ACC port. Orange (switched), red (constant), and grey (controller backlight).


Blue wire to (+) positive side of coil. (manual says to use (-) negative)??


Blank spot to mount controller




I modified the controller so that the wires came out the side, not the back.


How it's going to look.


and how it does look in the end: (I did coat the whole thing with silcon to weather proof it- just like in the Valkyriders.com guide. you can see some of the sealant on the wires. Be sure to keep the rubber pads in place when you seal it so the contacts on the back of the buttons will work)


I used some of the bracketry to make a mount from the bolt that holds the fuel filter in place. This feeds the servo cable from the right (throttle) side of the bike towards the #4 carb.




Another view from the left side:


I really should have taken a picture before I mounted this part, but here's another view:


Servo cable coming back to #4 armature. Also this is where I tapped into the vacuum lines that feed the air cut-off valve. the plastic black/white thing is a "vacuum check valve". it's basically a one way valve.


Here's the vacuum tank that I made. 6" of 2" PVC with a couple 3/16 barbed pipe adapters.


Another view.


Here's where I mounted it. Another guy mounted the Servo here, but I think it's a dirty spot, and hard to reach if you're going to service or check on the Servo. It's just mounted with a hose clamp and one of the mounting brackets supplied with the kit. it's held in place by one of the bolts for the saddle bag.




Dip switches:
1 ON
2 OFF
3 OFF
4 OFF
5 OFF
6 OFF
7 ON

Couldn't believe it, but it worked on the first real test drive. You can actually "bench test" it in your driveway on the bike. Since the unit is working off the RPM of the motor, just rev the bike in Neutral to 1500 and hit "set". The second it takes over, it revs up too high and automatically shuts down because of the built-in protection (example: pull in the clutch). I did this a couple times to save myself the hassle of pulling off all the tupperware if I made a mistake. first bench test failed because I forgot to hook up the ground off the servo. D'oh! Second test revealed that the (-) side of the coil didn't work. dwitgoldwing told me to try the (+) side even though the manual says to use the (-)...whatever...it worked! Third bench test failed because I didn't hook the vacuum back up to the air-check valve (where I was stealing vacuum) so it didn't develop any vacuum. All easy fixes, but would have been pretty difficult had I been out on the side of the highway trying to troubleshoot.

It actually worked way better than I was expecting. My test ride was at 1am, and I didn't realize when I bought it that the controller was back-lit. That was a nice touch especially at night.
This is a pre-post just to make sure my pictures work and to get started. More detail tomorrow.
-Kevin
 

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Nice job!!

The CCS-100 works well with a motorcycle.. too bad the search functiondoes not include all there is hereor you could see many others..
 

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sandiegobrass wrote:
Nice job!!

The CCS-100 works well with a motorcycle.. too bad the search functiondoes not include all there is hereor you could see many others..
Funny you should say that. I searched "Audiovox" then "cruise control" then "??" several other terms and found nothing...? maybe I'll try again.



I'm really amazed at how well it works. Thanks, and sorry if it's been posted 100x already. I always enjoy sharing my work.



-Kevin
 

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outofcontrol wrote:
..I'm really amazed at how well it works. Thanks, and sorry if it's been posted 100x already. I always enjoy sharing my work....
Hey.. I always like to here other ways to do it!! so don't apologize here!!... my only complaint is that the information that I know is in this forum is not accessible with the search.... ( Three of those installations were Oregonwinger, Wendell, and dan filipi..)

Edit: PS not all the pictures load for me (some do).. could be the firewall here at work, but thought it worth mentioning.. :waving:
 

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It might be because I was correcting some typos, but I don't know why some of the pics don't show up. they're hosted on Picasa. for some reason 1/2 the time they don't show up for me either? don't know why.
 

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Thats great. I'm gonna order a Audiovox cruise for mine. It came with the Markland Cruise but the control pod went bad because of the hole in the backside they didn't sealup. I really miss mine too.

So it works off rpm's and not the magnets like the Markland?
 

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oldtoys1961 wrote:
.. So it works off rpm's and not the magnets like the Markland?

either way..

if the magnets are already installed, you have that choice.... it is a slightly better way, in my opinion, as it is a true speed indicator independent of gear choice..

But why not just replace the control unit?? there are only two kinds (called "open" and "closed")
 

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I think the pictures will work better now. I uploaded them to the gallery here and then linked them to the thread. although it's hard to believe, but I think Google's image hosting is a little too slow.
 

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okay, bought the ccs-100, tore the bike apart, cannot figure out how to attach the servo to the throttle wheel. doesn't look any thing like yours. HELP PLEASE!! '92 Interstate
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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dcaughman wrote:
okay, bought the ccs-100, tore the bike apart, cannot figure out how to attach the servo to the throttle wheel. doesn't look any thing like yours. HELP PLEASE!! '92 Interstate
Can you post a picture? I don't know what the 15 carbs look like.
 

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Hey Kevin, is your CC working OK? Mine has developed a glitch.

It works fine when set, but when it has been de-activated after a while it will shut itself off. Usually when slowed down or stopped.

At first I thought it was a loose connector and reacting to bumps, but it has never shut off while set, and now, it will set with the resume button as well as the set button.

Dirt in the switch housing?
 

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throttle wheel has two cables on it, from and to the twist handle. found an attachment spot, but the direction of pull is perpendicular to centerline of bike, outward. found an attachment point to hook short loop over, but the servo cable lead is too long to get it far enough away to have any room to pull.
 

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dcaughman wrote:
will do, tell how please
Use a camera.:D



Actually, all you need to do is use the browse button that shows up when you are writing a post. Push the button and follow the tree to your pick andpush add.

This is a very simplified explanation because I assume you are smarter than I.
 

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Thanks for the pics Dcaughman. Man it's tight in there.

I didn't see what I was looking for. On my GL12, I put a lever off the #3 carb where the linkage attaches. I was hoping to see the linkage on your carbs to find an attachment-friendly spot...but it's sooo tight in there.

Two ideas; first is, attach the actuator cable to the linkage by drilling a hole in the linkage and attaching a mounting point for the chain. second, find an otherwise unusable set of carbs from a CC equipped model and get the attachment parts from them.

I hope this helps. You might want to start a new thread on this. I'm sure you aren't the only one to do this GL15-I, and someone on this forumprobably has the correct answer for you.
 

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B & D, yeah, 10lbs of stuff in a 5lb bag.



The linkage for the two carbs on my bike is on the opposite, or front side of the carbs, from the throttle pulley, between the forks and the carbs, making them inaccessible for drilling. dummy me, i took the fairing off before i noticed the forks would still be in the way.
 
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