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Had new tires put on the other day and noticed wobble at 15 mph.Did not do this with the dunlop elite 2s.go above 15 mph goes away drop below goes away.At the dealer now ,they do not know what it is yet.What is the correct tire pressure on these tires .Could it be a bad tire, steering head bearings balance problem. Bike has 78,000 miles on it and has always been maintained.
 
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Hey 1990 se :waving:Welcome to the forum and we all hope that you enjoy every visit. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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Dealer called said everything checked out the only thing it could be is the tire. Will let you know Monday (they did not have a tire in stock to fix it today):Xwhat the out come is.They did try lowering the tire pressure to 36 front and 42 rear.What is a good tire pressure on the avons single or double up. Thanks for your help and thanks for the welcome.
 

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"They did try lowering the tire pressure to 36 front and 42 rear."

Scares me when I hear this. That was the whole problem with the why about 5 years ago Ford was having a lot of problems with tires blowing resulting with turn overs and a lot of fatalities. As I understand it Firestone had one PSI on their tire, and Ford had a lesser psi in the book and on the door frame. The only possible reason I can think of why Ford would do this is to get a smoother ride by running the tires low.

I just looked at a viper I am mounting and it says 50 PSI when cold. Your tire may have a different PSI from what I am putting on, but I would follow what the tire says.

What happens is if you run too far below what the tire is designed for it will not dissipate the heat, and the heat will build up causing the tire to separate, and make it a high risk for blow out.

This is the very reason I choose to do all of my work on everything I own. Takes a lot of time to do research, but at least I know I have done the best there is.

You might want to put it on the center stand and first spin the tire and check the wheel first to make sure it has not been bent, and if that checks out then do the same thing to the tire. Check the sidewall and the thread. There will be a little deviation, but if more than a quarter of an inch I would certainly pursue getting a new tire.

Tires come out of the factory all of the time where they are out of round. All tires are inspected, but by humans and everything a human does has a 3% error rate. No matter how hard the factories try to catch the bad tires, a small percent slip thru.


But I would highly recommend following what the tire says for PSI.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Avons say 50psi on the sidewall. My first set I ran at 50psi front and rear. Made for a stiff ride but I got 22,000 miles out of them. Second set, which I'm running now, have 46 rear and 44 front. Gonna see if psi has anything to do with tire life.
 

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Fritz if a tire is inflated to specs it should wear even. If it is inflated too low it will wear on the sides of the thread. If it is overinflated the middle will wear thinner than the outside. Personally I like the idea of running low for a smoother ride. Running low will affect your gas mileage, and also the tire will run hotter low than it will if run to factory specs.
 

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Hi 1990, welcome to the forum.

Wing wobble isvery common, but rarely happens with new tires. You don't say if yours is happening with hands on, or off the handlebars.

By the way, could you update your profile a little?

Salem, USA could be Massachusettes, Indiana, Oregon...hell, I think there's a Salem in just about every state.

 

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I think if you have never changed the steering bearings on it, that its probably time.
 

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I have ran a couple sets of Avon Venom X tires on my '99 Wing. I run 45 psi front and 50 psi rear with good handling, performance and wear.
 

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I know an engineer for a tire manufacturer and we have previously discussed replacement tires for motor vehicles. Here is what I have been told.

When the bike/auto manufacturers initially make their product, they issue a request for bids to the tire manufacturers for tires to use during assembly. In their request, they specify certain characteristics that the tires must meet. Sometimes the specifications are aimed a correcting an issue in the manufacture of the bike/auto such as a wobble or vibration at certain speeds and other times they are just for the best riding or handling tire. The tire manufacturers then take their best shot at building the requested tire and submit some for evaluation by the bike/auto maker. The bike/auto manufacturer then tests the tires at various tire pressures to see which one(es) best meet their goals and that becomes the factory recommended tire and tire pressure that is put in the owners manual and on the sticker on the frame. That brand/model of tire at the factory specified tire pressure may not give you the best handling or tire life but it will be the best riding tire you will ever have on your ride since that tire was "custom made" for the application.

You may or may not be able to obtain identical replacement tires depending on whether the tire maker created a new tire model for vehicle factory or just modified an existing aftermarket tire and ran a large batch for the bike/auto factory to use. If you go to www.tirerack.com you will sometimes see two or three tires with the same model number but also OEM. This means they took an existing tire and modified it for a specific application. If you check the OEM designation further, you'll see which vehicles the tire was custom made for.

In the case of Ford, I've heard the lower tire pressures made the vehicle less "tipsy" on turns than they were with the higher tire pressures but a combination of high speeds+overloaded vehicles+heat buildup from low air pressure caused tire failure.
 
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