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[align=left] “I just had that in my hand a couple minutes ago”. The older I get the more often I seem to say that. If you're like me some days it seems like you spend all of your time looking for things you just had in your hands. That's why I think it's important to spend a little bit time getting organized before undertaking a major project like this one.

The first and absolutely most essential thing that you will need is a factory shop manual. The aftermarket ones are okay but the factory shop manual is really the only way to go. There are a couple of sources for them, eBay for one, then there's craigslist as well as some Internet sites that will sell you a digital copy. Or maybe you know someone who used to have a Goldwing and doesn't need his old manual anymore..

The next thing that I think is extremely important is to keep the build diary. Just a three-ring notebook so you can keep the pictures that you're going to take with your digital camera before you take things apart. You should also keep list of the part numbers and descriptions of things you need to replace. Lists of part numbers for nonstock things that you installed on the bike. As well as notes about anything else you think is important, including copies of any state regulations that you might bump up against if your state requires you to have the bike inspected.

The next thing to round up is some storage containers. The big rubber tubs are great for storing big parts. I also buy some plastic" dishpans" that the dollar store sells for a buck apiece. Not only are they good for storing stuff, they make great drain pans for oil and antifreeze. You can also use them to clean parts in. Throw away Tupperware style containers are very handy as well.

I like to keep an assortment of ziplock freezer bags around. These are great for keeping small parts and fasteners with the parts they belong to. I keep a paper punch handy so that I can punch a hole in the corner of the bag and then use a rubber band to attach the bag full of bolts to the part.









Lastly a fist full of paper tags with strings or wires can be used to identify parts as well as identifying the connectors on the wiring harness so you know which things get plugged into where.



Lastly we should talk about budgets. It's a good idea to have a rough idea of how much the project is going to cost. Double that and you should be about right. To keep the project moving along, it's important to plan your spending. For instance unless you find a really good deal, there's no point in buying new tires until the project is nearly ready for the street. Some people believing keeping a ledger of every penny they spend, others prefer not to leave any evidence for the divorce lawyer. I'll leave that call up you.


Tomorrow will get the old girl up on the left and get our hands dirty.


Stay tuned


Steve

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i totally agree with ya pilot


my grand dad and my step dad inspired me to be what i am today a very good mechanic


now my grand dad barley ever bought anything brand new out of the box he could always improve on the concept or design he built everything from scratch he wasnt so much a mechanic but he was a great carpenter

my step dad and i had a account with a rich banker when i was 10yrs old to restore 100 john deere D's boy duct tape and bailing wire is a necessity there i tell ya what


i have boxes of old copies of popular mechaics magazines i always pick up a few copies at swap meets you never know what your going to find in them so those are very handy things to have. The newer copies dont have the ingenuity as the old copies do in my opinion but never the less always opens your mind a bit.


great idea on the bike best of luck may as well throw a supercharger on it while your at it lol.
 

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for parts bins someone posted on the fourm once to use egg cartons for smaller bolts and take a sharpie and mark on them ive used this at work and home and i is a handy cheap storage bin espcially for smaller screws nuts and bolts
 

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Discussion Starter #24
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peterbilt wrote:
great idea on the bike best of luck may as well throw a supercharger on it while your at it lol.
I would love to I've looked into a couple but I just don't have the budget.

Steve
 

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i saw somethin on you tube on a guy who put a blower on a wing looks like it could cost alot
 

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I got the young lady up on the lift today. There were not too many surprises, I hadn't noticed the handlebar setbacks before,(I think they're headed for eBay) and I hadn't noticed how badly they had butchered the back fender installing the Yosemite Sam mudflap. But all in all pretty much what I was expecting.









The first step was to get the seat, the saddlebags, sissy bar and tour trunk off. After that what was left of the headers came off. Finally the fairing was removed, now we have a much better look at what we have to work with.





After removing the rear wheel, I lifted the back of the bike up and put this 9 inch cube of two by fours under the engine case. Now the bike will balance on the two by fours.



I can't over emphasize how important it is to keep the bike strapped down all the time. It's scary to think what it would be like to have one of these beasts fall off the lift.


Next of front wheel and forks were taken off. The last thing to come off for today was the false tank. Notice the tags on the wiring harness, this is always been a huge timesaver for me.

That's about it for today, I have about five hours into this project so far and I'm about halfway through the disassembly phase.

More tomorrow

Steve
 

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Will we be able to recognize her as a goldwing when you're done?

Nice looking workshop by the way Steve.
 

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JackfromCT wrote:
Will we be able to recognize her as a goldwing when you're done?
Oh yeah it's not going to be anything radical. Just the 1200 engine and maybe a Vetter series IV fairing.

Steve
 

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This is going to begreat. I am going to follow along with great interest !Thanks for posting this.
 

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This is in my office is signed by Big Daddy himself. I had a very nice conversation with him a couple years before he died.





Steve
 

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Hi Steve,

Looks like she's progressing nicely in the time you've had. Should there be some kind ofwarning or censorship now she's down to her underwear? It might scare folk when they realise what's underneath them when riding. Oops... I mean... Oh well, I'll put the shovel away then.

The only thing I'm really envious of is that Bridgeport Mill sitting grinning at me, rotary table, normal vise and all! I have to make do with a 1ES and vertical head - which is a pain to change over.

Keep up the great work, I LOVE this kind of article.
 

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popular sience or popular mechanics, i don't remember but one of them got me kicked out of high school for three days
 

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Orcadian wrote:
The only thing I'm really envious of is that Bridgeport Mill sitting grinning at me...
I noticed that too. Nice, ain't' it. I'd love to have one in my garage. Would make small portions of my life a lot easier and more enjoyable.

:)
 

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I'm sorry this post is so late tonight, I had to help my Rotary club with their Winter Dazs float. But what could be more fun than handing out candy to other people's little kids just before bedtime.

I must've gotten a lot done today based on the mess my shop is in. I spent about four hours and finished disassembling the bike. That doesn't make for very exciting photographs but I do have a couple of things I wanted to show you.

This photograph makes it obvious why I put the 9 inch cube of two by fours under the engine. The two by fours are screwed together with three-inch screws. By doing it this I was able to disassemble the whole bike and then lift the frame off of the engine. Now I have an engine sitting on a workbench ready to be worked on. All the posts about disassembling carburetors to get the engine out are true if you're only taking the engine out. But if you're going to disassemble the bike for complete rebuild like this one, I think this is the better way to go.




The other thing I want to show you is that I always try to wrap up the fragile parts and all the chrome parts in newspaper. I mark each package so that I know what's inside and I tape a list of the contents to the out side of the tub.





People's comments about my mill caused me to think a little bit about how I'm going to do this bike. The whole premise of this thread was to have a discussion about how to build an inexpensive motorcycle. Normally when I'm building a bike if I come across, for instance a throttle cable where the chrome is all rusted out like this bike has, all I have to do is go to the shelf and grab a better one. The normal person doesn't have the inventory of parts that I do so in order to keep this build true to the premise of this thread I'm going to refrain from doing that. Instead I will use the least expensive techniques I can think of to refurbish the part.

Refurbishing parts that would normally be tossed is time intensive but rewarding work. This will have an impact on the design of the bike, as the chrome is in pretty tough shape. So I'm going to build the bike with more painted parts and less chrome. Right now I'm leaning towards black with some red highlights. But I'm open to suggestions.

Tomorrow is supposed be fairly warm, at least for a Wisconsin winter. After I'm done cleaning the shop I will probably sand blast the frame and the parts that are too big to fit in my sand blast cabinet. This is an outside project and when the weather's too cold my home built sand blaster freezes up.

Steve
 

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DaveO430 wrote:
:clapper:Kool!
I am also building an 1100 out of parts I have mostly. Other than a few soft parts and fluids it will be totally out of used parts from other bikes. I figure to have less than $100 bucks in it when it's road ready. Won't be pretty though, I am not painting anything or even cleaning anything much.
This we have to see... post B4 and After photos of this too please.
 

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Steve,
I was in your town this summer on my way to my mom's in Marquette. Lots of road construction and the Honda shop wanted $20 per headlight bulb. At least the mgr said you can buy them cheaper at Autozone. Then some of them went into a big fuss against using Delo400 or ANY auto oil.
Bryce, we might do a ride this summer up that way. Steve, you think you might keep it for a few months? I'd like to see it in person when she's done.

Dino
 

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Boy......you sure took B-girl apart quick. I look forward to watching your progress each day when I return home from work......

Very nice work environment! I would show you a photo of my shop.....but it would be a photo of a driveway.


I shall live vicariously through this thread,
RED
 

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waiting with eyes wide open for daily post. i think this is a excellent post and appreciated

by mini of us out there.:cheesygrin:
 
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