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joedrum wrote:
seems i was being fooled some ...the 1200 not hitting on T 1 mark either ...so im thinking that 1200 no different than the 1100 ive already got early 1000 cams in ....at this point im going to get some clay and see what clearence ive got going on in the 1200 and the 1100 ive got side by side to test on ....my belt tensioner was making a small noise when the cam was at its highest making me think it was slightly hitting when turning by hand ....i guess i was being over careful and it took fresh start this morning to figure it out
I think if you look closely at the piston tops on the two engines you'll see that the valve relief on the 1100 is totally different than that two valve reliefs on both the top and bottom of the 1200 piston. You may also see that when you turned it over the first time you left some marks be real careful to make sure that you didn't been the valves. I'm in the middle of doing a new post on reconditioning the heads which will include lapping the valves. One of the things I should be able to show is how to spot a slightly bent valve when you're lapping valves.

Steve
 

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steve theres no doubt that early 1000 motors 75-77 have deeper cutouts but from 78 and later yrs there not as deep....ive got the two motors right next to each other...it not visable by eye anyway...one an 80 1100 the other is 86 1200 ....now the piston domes are different but just slightly....i can also see that the piston deck out the same at the top of the block....

yea theres no reason not to redo the heads once everything is ready to go for final assembly...
 

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Discussion Starter #163
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joedrum wrote:
steve theres no doubt that early 1000 motors 75-77 have deeper cutouts but from 78 and later yrs there not as deep....ive got the two motors right next to each other...it not visable by eye anyway...one an 80 1100 the other is 86 1200 ....now the piston domes are different but just slightly....i can also see that the piston deck out the same at the top of the block....

yea theres no reason not to redo the heads once everything is ready to go for final assembly...
On the 1100s I have the piston tops are different than the 1200s in that the 1100s have a single valve relief on the top and bottom of the piston the 1200s have two valve reliefs on the top and two on the bottom that's because the valves in the 1200 engine are in a different place and I think at a different angle than the 1100 head. The reason the early 1000 motors ( 75 to 77) have deeper valve reliefs is that the cams have more left.

All that really matters is the result you get when you put the clay in and crank the piston through a few strokes. You can use Play-Doh by the way it's cheaper.

Steve
 

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Today we are going to go through the heads.

This is about as tough as a head can get and still be savable.


The first thing to do is remove the cam pulley, you'll probably need a gear puller.


After you remove the rocker arm assembly and camshaft, mark each cylinder with a punch, this one is number four. This allows you to keep the valves and springs with their perspective cylinder, this is important for a good job.



Now you can disassemble the valves and springs. Put bolts in all of the threaded holes, this will keep blast media out of the threads. Now the head it is ready for cleaning. I use a sandblast cabinet with a mix of glass beads and walnut hulls for media. Once the head is clean you need to thoroughly rinse it and dry it with compressed air to make sure that all of the media is out of the head. Pay special attention to the oil galleries and water passages. When you think you have it really clean, clean it again.



With the head all cleaned up the next step is to surface it. Any automotive machine shop can do this for you. I believe it's critically important and here's why.

I colored the gasket surface with a magic marker before I mounted this head on the mill. After taking .004" off you can see that the head still hasn't cleaned up. I'm convinced that this is a source of many of the problems that people blame on non-OEM head gaskets. After all the head gaskets you're replacing were OEM head gaskets and in most cases they didn't last all that long.


Here's the head all cleaned up quite, a difference from the first picture. Now we can lap the valves.


Here's a valve the way it was when it came out of the head.



Start by cleaning the valve with a wire brush mounted on a bench grinder. Avoid having the brush contact the stem area. Once it's all cleaned up, coat the valve seat surface with lapping compound. After coating the stem with some assembly lube, slide the valve into the valve guide.


The actual lapping is done with the lapping stick.




Wet the suction cup and stick it to face a valve. Now rotate the stick by rubbing your hands together to create back-and-forth motion ( think Tarzan starting a fire). This will lap both the valve and the seat.



Here's a valve that been lapped but isn't quite clean. The dark spots that you see are actually pits.



There's one that's cleaned up properly.




This is what a bent valve looks like when you try to lapped .





When the valve and the seat have a nice, pit free surface, you can remove the valve and clean off the lapping compound. Most are water soluble.
Next check the valve spring length and compare it to the numbers in the manual. I've never had one where the springs were out of spec.



Install the new valve seals and reassemble the valves and springs. Remember to put assembled lube on the valve stems.

With all the valves in place thoroughly clean the rocker arm assembly and the camshaft. Coat the camshaft bearings and lobes with assembly lube and assemble them onto the head. Rotate the camshaft to make sure it's free and tighten the bolts following the recommended tightening sequence from the manual. Keep rotating the camshaft to make sure that it isn't binding up. If any of the bolts bind as your tightening them, stop and find out why. Trying to tighten the bolts down when there's foreign material in the holes can crack ahead. Don't ask me how I know that.




With the camshaft in place, you can reinstall the seals, the end plate and the pulley.

The head is ready to be reinstalled, don't forget the little oil orifice.

Steve
 

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Thanks Steve
That's What I'm -A- Talkin About
Ed
 

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Yesterday I finished doing the valve reliefs on the good engine and based on some feedback from members I increase the valve clearance on the intake valves to .01. On this engine the clearance on the exhaust valve was at about .075 or so. I left that as it was.

I discovered a trick to help keep the chips out of the water jackets. I masked off the water jackets with masking tape and then trimmed out around the cylinder openings. This was a big improvement.



The last thing to be done before prepping the engine for paint is the exhaust system. The original exhaust system was almost totally rusted away. Anybody can bolt on an exhaust system, But it wouldn't make for very interesting reading. Aftermarket exhaust systems are way out of the budget of this project so I think I'll make a set of custom pipes. I would like to use stainless steel but again way out of budget! So I'm going to use mild steel tubing for the primary runners. I have a chunk of big tubing that actually was a roller for a carpeting display that my steel supplier was selling for $3.00 that will make perfect muffler I think.

Steve
 

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Well a little bit done today, I put the engine back into the frame and temporarily installed the swingarm, the rear wheel, rear brake and the shock absorbers. Then I fliped the whole works upside down on my left able. I blocked up the rear the frame with a couple 6X8s until I got the lower frame rail level. I figure this is easier than having to lay on my back and a weld the exhaust headers.

I removed what was left of the old headers from the mounting flange by drilling the weld out with an 11/2" hole saw.



Once the flange was loose, I sandblasted it and ground the casting marks smooth.



I started bending the exhaust pipe. I think I need to redo the rear one on this side. With any kind of luck at all I should have a finished system tomorrow.


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Looks nice from this angle. Do you have a bender? I went through Menomonie yesterday and the evening before on my way to Milwaukee to pick up an 83 for a base for my project. Not as many usable parts as I was hoping for on it. Rotors look very thin, panels are pretty dinged up as is the rear fender. Oh well, I wish I'd had more time to have swung by to look at some of your projects, but it was like your town's name: me no money. My pickup made me spend as much on gas to get there and back as I did for the bike. My newer plans are to put my 1200 block with 1000 heads into the 83 1100. If I can, I'll put the 1100 into the 77 I have left and see if I can get it fixed decent enough to give to my brother who as a Marine made me go to college and helped me out a lot along the way.
 

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I still didn't get this part of the project finished but I made some progress.








I don't own a tubing bender. But fortunately I have a friend who generously lets me use his. There are also plans available to build your own.

If you're interested in a project like this and don't have a tubing bender, Ron Covell has a nice video on working with tubing. He covers hand bending tubing using an acetylene torch and a wooden bending from, it's very well done

If you're cheap like me and don't want to buy the video you can rent it at SmartFlix.com How-To DVDs


I'm not going to be able to work on this tomorrow but with a little better luck I can finish the exhaust up on Thursday.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #173
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ekvh wrote:
Looks nice from this angle. Do you have a bender? I went through Menomonie yesterday and the evening before on my way to Milwaukee to pick up an 83 for a base for my project. Not as many usable parts as I was hoping for on it. Rotors look very thin, panels are pretty dinged up as is the rear fender. Oh well, I wish I'd had more time to have swung by to look at some of your projects, but it was like your town's name: me no money. My pickup made me spend as much on gas to get there and back as I did for the bike. My newer plans are to put my 1200 block with 1000 heads into the 83 1100. If I can, I'll put the 1100 into the 77 I have left and see if I can get it fixed decent enough to give to my brother who as a Marine made me go to college and helped me out a lot along the way.
I'm sorry you couldn't stop yesterday. No I don't have a tubing bender but I have a friend who dose and he generously lets me use it. Before that I used bend tubing by filling it up with sand and then heating it to cherry red and bending it over a wooden form. Ron Covell has a good video on this process. You can buy it from his website or you can rent it from. SmartFlix.com How-To DVDs

Steve
 

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MJSantos wrote:
Looking at your exhaust, looks great. Did you compensate for the centerstand or is it staying off?
The center stand is on but on this bike it looks like they just let it rest against the muffler when it was in the up position because there was no stop. My plan is to keep it but I will make a stop for it.

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1st off I just want to say that I feel you're doing a great job in documenting your project. The way this post has moved to the top of the page just goes to prove that there is a definate following and interest in the subject.



My only input is one of curiosity. Could the reason for the 1200's pistons having four valve relief cuts be related to the different valve angles of the heads; and that the heads are interchangeable, left to right, as they are in the small block Chevy engines.



This has been a very enjoyable read, thanks for all of your hard work... :gunhead:
 

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Shooter wrote:
1st off I just want to say that I feel you're doing a great job in documenting your project. The way this post has moved to the top of the page just goes to prove that there is a definate following and interest in the subject.



My only input is one of curiosity. Could the reason for the 1200's pistons having four valve relief cuts be related to the different valve angles of the heads; and that the heads are interchangeable, left to right, as they are in the small block Chevy engines.



This has been a very enjoyable read, thanks for all of your hard work... :gunhead:
Thank you for your kind comments.

Your exactly right the valves on the 1200 heads are closer to perpendicular to the crank centerline. They also have less lift. If they had more lift they would , at some point only need one relief.

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Me and two friends from work now.......enjoy viewing the B-girl's progress on our lunch break on one of there fancy I-phone's. Great job Steve. You make it look so easy. Just curious......how much did you remove from the heads with your milling machine in the end?


RED
 

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THEBIGRED1 wrote:
Me and two friends from work now.......enjoy viewing the B-girl's progress on our lunch break on one of there fancy I-phone's. Great job Steve. You make it look so easy. Just curious......how much did you remove from the heads with your milling machine in the end?


RED
RED:

It took .007 to clean up the one head. I took .015 of both heads to bring the compression up a bit.
I'm sorry I'm not making progress faster but some of this stuff just takes time.

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SuperSkypilot.Been folowing your post for a few days and wanted to add to the head progress.I had an 82 that I did some head work on and it turned out really good.I took my die grinder and opened up the intake side and polished it out some (not really shiney) and built a new exahaust(4into one)and added a Suzuki GS 1000 muffler.I had some problem with really bad hesitation while going to WOT until I made a baffle to choke down the pipe into the muffler,tried different sizes and wound up that 1 inch fixed the hesitation.after I was done the engine would turn 11000-12000 thousand rpm pretty easy and had a really different sound at high rpm.Had a lot of fun with it,surprised a lot of faster bikes and it still lives,(I no longer own it) I got the idea from a guy in Apachie Junction AZ,he had a 1100 that had dual webbers and had a 15000 rev limiter on it,last time I saw him he still had it but had not run it for a while.I had the weight down under 500 lbs,Good work you are doing.
 
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