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last couple of months my battery keeps discharging, Battery just dies down. Bought new battery, changed alternator. Charged the battery and again after 1 week battery dead. Presume there is an electrical leak somewhere ???

Can anyone guide most common areas to look at and measure?? Is this a common problem with others?

Thanks Aris
 

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Have you checked the alternator output? A voltmeter on the bike could help. What type of battery did you buy? Wet cell, or A.G.M.? Not a common problem with my 1500 anyway. Shouldn`t be dead in a week.
Tom Bishop
`98 S.E.
 

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yes there is a small drain on the battery . it well drain the battery down to a point that the engine will not start because of low voltage . if setting its best to hook up a battery tender that will keep your battery up to full 12.8 volts automatically when needed.
 

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wda-83wing wrote:
yes there is a small drain on the battery . it well drain the battery down to a point that the engine will not start because of low voltage . if setting its best to hook up a battery tender that will keep your battery up to full 12.8 volts automatically when needed.
My experience exactly............if I leave mine parked for longer than ten days or so, the battery is run down enough to prevent a start. My understanding is that this is because of a small draw for the clock and radio memory and is quite normal.

Issue was more serious (causing a no start situation in as little as 2-3 days) when I had my OEM alternator and battery and was riding in low rpm situation, such as prolonged rush hour. The alternator could just not produce enough power to keep the battery up to snuff and power the lights, radio, etc. and store enough residual power to allow a start after a few days. I now have a high output alternator and an AGM battery.

As a result , I take every opportunity to keep a "smart" trickle charger on my bike when I leave it for longer a day or so.

Cheers!

T.
 

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wda-83wing wrote:
yes there is a small drain on the battery . it well drain the battery down to a point that the engine will not start because of low voltage . if setting its best to hook up a battery tender that will keep your battery up to full 12.8 volts automatically when needed.


First, make sure the alternator is working right. Check with a voltmeter across the battery terminals to make sure you're getting about 14.3 volts at say 2,000rpm.

Then:

If the battery's good and nothing's malfunctioning, it won't go dead in a week from the clock running.

I'd be inclined to put an ammeter between the battery (-) and the ground cable and see what it's pulling. I would guess it ought to be a few milliamps. If that's all it is, the battery's not holding a charge. Charge it up and leave it disconnected and see if it goes dead. If it goes dead, take it back whence it came and give the seller a battery enema.

If the bike's pulling some serious current, I'd hook the battery back up and start checking current draw across each fuse ( pull the fuse, hook up your ammeter across the holder. That ought to narrow it down. Then you'll need a wiring diagram to home in on the problem.

Good luck matey, the Goldwing is a nightmare of overcomplication.
 

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Do you have any electrical accessories on the bike? If so, then it would be a good idea to install a Relay-operated Isolator Panel, which turns Off any/all accessories when the engine is turned off.
 

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ARITHIAN wrote:
what do you exactly mean by 'battery tender' ???
Small battery charger/monitor that only charges when battery gets below a certain voltage.

Check the alternator.

I have also bought bad batteries before.
 

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I had the same problem last month and TLBRANTH is right, using a meter is the quickest way to identify any problem. An easy thing to do and will rule out a bad alternator and tell you if something is pulling a current when the bike is stood. If those 2 tests prove ok then you are probably looking at a bad battery.
 

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One other thing to remember short hopps with all the lights on doesn't really charge the bike up completely. Check the alternator output but if I remember you said you replaced it. So that eliminates the alternator and multiple Battery changes eliminates the battery. So I would say somewhere in your system you have a short. Start with anything you have installed in or on the bike. I use a Fuse panel which turns off when the key is turned off. I know they are around 50.00 but they are well worth it. So as Tilbranth has said you need a Amp meter, remove the seat (makes it easier to get to the fuses) and one at a time remove the fuses if the Draw stops with one fuse there you go. That will give you a real good place to start.
 

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if your bike has internal vanity lite that turns on as you lift the lid,check the switch to see that it turns off as you close the lid,this is an often overlooked problem
 

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PurplePirate wrote:
One other thing to remember short hopps with all the lights on doesn't really charge the bike up completely.
Was exactly the point I was making as well.............the stock alternator cannot keep up with consumption on multiple short trips, prolonged rush hour, lots of accessories (I plead guilty!). I think that many of those of us that have installed a voltmeter have noticed that the OEM alternator simply doesn't put out much at idle - this has been commented on multiple times on this site and is a common experience. In addition, your battery must be in top notch condition.

As, I say, I installed a new, high output alternator and AGM battery after observing the goings on with my voltmeter (read - no charge at idle!)...........that and being stranded in two hours worth of stop and go rush hour traffic!

Not saying you don't have an unreasonable draw and the testing procedure above is excellent.............but my mechanic tells me that you will find a small, constant draw for sure - key word is "small". Even a top notch, new, AGM motorcycle battery has only a finite amount of power and it isn't anywhere near what your automotive battery would be.

Even after installing my new alternator (which charges at 13.5 - 14 volts, even at idle) I plug a battery tender into my 1500 as a matter of rule - especially if having just ridden around town or leaving it for a prolonged period. Just makes me more comfortable.

If on a long trip where it charges for a longer period at a higher rpm and I am going to continue the next day, I just don't worry about it.

Good luck!

T.
 

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A battery tender is always a good idea and a good one will not damage the battery. I always hook mine up any time I think will not ride for a week.
 

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Thank you all for your analytic replies. So bottom line, if bike remains a couple of days not used, it is wise to have a tender hooked on battery till next use otherwise batter will drain. will check drains on fuses and will revert with analysis. Thanks all once again. Aris
 

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I would disconnect the negative battery cable and connect a multimeter, set on a high scale for amps, in series with it and the battery. Connect the- lead to the battery post and the+ lead to the cable you removed. If you don't get a reading then go to a lower scale until you do. It should be 5 milliamps or less. If it is more then you have a problem that needs to be found. You can put the battery cable back on and start removing fuses and put the meter on the fuse clips to test for current flow. If you get one that is reading high then that circuit has too much drain on it.

Be sure the switch is turned off and that there is no other accessories turned on to pull current while you are testing.




Edit to show the proper polarity at the battery terminals.
 

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Use the process the Bellboy describes, but then just leave it in place. Start pulling fuses and when you find the accessory or fuse that has the draw, the ampmeter will show you.

Much simpler than pulling each fuse and putting the ampmeter to each fuse.
 

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SJY207 wrote:
Use the process the Bellboy describes, but then just leave it in place. Start pulling fuses and when you find the accessory or fuse that has the draw, the ampmeter will show you.

Much simpler than pulling each fuse and putting the ampmeter to each fuse.
He is right of course. I was making it more complicated than it needed to be. If you see a lot of parasitic current draw, then just start pulling fuses and when it clears the current drain you have found the circuit that is causing your problem.
 
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