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have had various problems recently with my 1984 1200 aspencade. i appears after variious investigations that the rectifier/regulator was kaput. prior to this, it was putting 17.5 volts into the battery and before we realised this it hadcaused the battery to boil over. :X

Have fitted a new rectifier and have had the battery on trickle charge, took it for its first spin tonight. I had the headlight, rear lights and some small orange lights at the front one, was also using the radio and cb. Travelled 20 miles to where we were going, not much stopping and starting. The voltmeter on the bike was showing 11.5 to 11.9v whilst travelling. With the rear brakes on it was dropping to 10.9.

On returning home with the same lights on, but now with the orange ones turned off and the spotlights turned on as it was dark, I got to a mile from home and on pressing the brake noticed the stereo cutting out and the digital dash display disappearing. On taking the foot of the brake it cam back on again. Managed to get home and onto the drive and was unable to restart it. The battery appeared to have enough power to operate the indepenant spot lights but couldnt start the bike. It was completely dead at teh starter switch. Put it on trickle charge for 30 mins and it now has some power to the starter but not enough to start it. The voltmeter shows 11 at teh battery when the ignition is turned on, but drops to 4 when attempting to start the bike.

My question is at the end of this, is as the battery was boiled and may have been overloaded for a while before we realised the rectifier was on its way out, will it need replacing. :baffled:


forgot to say have had the alternator checked and is okay and have soldered the yellow wires.


thanks

janet
 

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janhsmn wrote:
have had various problems recently with my 1984 1200 aspencade. i appears after variious investigations that the rectifier/regulator was kaput. prior to this, it was putting 17.5 volts into the battery and before we realised this it hadcaused the battery to boil over. :X

Have fitted a new rectifier and have had the battery on trickle charge, took it for its first spin tonight. I had the headlight, rear lights and some small orange lights at the front one, was also using the radio and cb. Travelled 20 miles to where we were going, not much stopping and starting. The voltmeter on the bike was showing 11.5 to 11.9v whilst travelling. With the rear brakes on it was dropping to 10.9.

On returning home with the same lights on, but now with the orange ones turned off and the spotlights turned on as it was dark, I got to a mile from home and on pressing the brake noticed the stereo cutting out and the digital dash display disappearing. On taking the foot of the brake it cam back on again. Managed to get home and onto the drive and was unable to restart it. The battery appeared to have enough power to operate the indepenant spot lights but couldnt start the bike. It was completely dead at the starter switch. Put it on trickle charge for 30 mins and it now has some power to the starter but not enough to start it. The voltmeter shows 11 at the battery when the ignition is turned on, but drops to 4 when attempting to start the bike.


forgot to say have had the alternator checked and is okay and have soldered the yellow wires.
Janet, you ask..
My question is at the end of this, is as the battery was boiled and may have been overloaded for a while before we realised the rectifier was on its way out, will it need replacing. :baffled:
Quite possibly, what you probably need to do is: pull the battery out, then fully re-charge it overnight, then take it to a local battery or bike shop & have it load tested.. That will tell the story for you..

If the battery is good then you have other charging system or wiring issues.. If the battery load tests bad then you have your answer there..

If your battery is good-to-go post back & we will talk you through a full on-bike wiring functional check..

Twisty
 

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motorcycle batteries really do not have a very good "life-span". At best I usually have gotten about 2 years life out of mine. Last year I spent more for a maintenance free battery for my '78, so we will see if that does any better.
 

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Good point Rodger, 2 years seems to be the norm for motorbike batteries. I have found that keeping the battery connected to a battery tender or optimate will easily double that to around 4 years. Not possible I know with a bike parked outdoors, but if yours lives in a garage you can easily hook a connection up a tender every night.
 

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I Change my Yuasa wet battery every 3 years, take the old one out and put it in my riding lawnmower, it usually lasts in there 3 years ready for the next change.
 

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 Many times, on the slightly unstable 1200 electrical system ,  the dying rectifier will take the poor old stator down with it../forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif. I would recommend ......                                                                                                                                    #1    start with the battery ... it either is unable to hold the charge after boiling over, or its not getting enough charge .... Have a competent shop test it under load, and test the Specific gravity ,as well...  then                                                                                                                                   #2   check the stator output...  its a three part test .... 55 + volts on each of the three yellows... open (infinite ) to ground from each yellow (bike off), and zero ohms  from one yellow to the others (bike off) ... and if it passess.....                                                                                                                                     #3 check the Rectifier output voltage again.. should be around  14 or so output... and oh yes... occasionally, I have heard of a dying stator taking the rectifier with it... so even though its a new rectifier the stator might have killed it again ... so , sadly ... check it again                                                                                                                                                               SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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I'd agree with the 2 year battery life. Lucky to get even that if your bike lives outdoor in northern Europe. :?:?
 

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2 YEARS:baffled:I have a WestCo sealed battery

http://www.westcobattery.com/battery_page.php?bid=16&vid=1&mid=69

It was bought 9 yes 9 years ago. Was on a battery maintainer for 4 years. I ran it this summer and it worked flawless:weightlifter:I expect it to work fine next summer also but if it does die i know what the new one will be.

Pat
 

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Sometimes, when a battery "boils over," the plates buckle at the bottom of the case where you can't see them. Once a plate distorts like that, it contacts another plate and the battery is no longer useable. The plates "sulphate" during the creation of electrical current and become very thin with time, so if it gets too much voltage during the charging state, a plate will twist or bulge and contact a plate close to it..

Like Twisty suggested, take it ot ashop or something like Auto Zone and have it tested...

ps.... did you purchase a brand newrectifier or used???If you were overcharging on that same battery with the original rectifier and now are undercharging with the replacement unit,,,, you may have a defective replacement rectifier.. Test the battery first. It's the cheapest way to continue...
 

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Batteries need TLC, they also need to be mounted in a fashion that reduces vibration. If your battery is loosely installed in its holder then use rubber to firm up the connections to the bike.

Batteries need to be looked at and cleaned often. The electrolyte level is the best and quickes way to tell if over charging is taking place. Also touch and smell that chemical storage tank and shake the connectors to see if they are tight.

In winter in cold climates remove that poor box and stick it in a warm comfortable place and keep it fully charged. Never store it on concrete, always a block of dry plywood or a dry shelf on wood. Keep it clean. Keep the terminals clean.

Fully charge the little gem and once in a while over charge it in a controlled manner to bubble the liquid conductor within to help remove sulphates from the lead sponge materials.

Every couple of years dump the liquid out into a glass container while you wear protective gear and clothing and clean out the bottom of the battery from the black spent lead. This stuff is conductive and will short circuit the sponge plates to the point of no use. Pour the electrolyte through filter paper and reinstall into the battery.

Top up only with pure water. Now get this. You should get about 10 years of life from a 3 year battery. Do not use maintenance free batteries unless you can actually strip them open and check the fluid in the individual cells.

If you go sealed, be sure that the battery is made with a one way vent to allow excessive gas to escape. Wet Lead Acid batteries are OK but need TLC. Calcium batteries are also OK. Do not use a deep cycle battery in a bike, that technology uses thick plates to deliver low amps a lot of the time. The auto battery with its sponge surface delivers lots of amps infrequently and then takes on a fairly hefty charge.

Then again, you can always buy a battery every other year and toss the old one in the heap. If you look after your battery you will automatically look after the charging systems. Enough said?



Al Knapp
 

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 Whew !!  Somewhere after the  ......take the battery indoors, I got exhausted , just reading .... (Glass container, Special Gear, pour out, remove lead sludge, re-install the  acid.... ....)      I agree .. you probably could get 10 years on a battery .... but ... but ....  My local battery dealer always has a sale on batteries that did not sell soon enough... cars ,and bikes ($65) ... same warrenty, same guarantee , almost half price .. ... and for all the trouble... I prefer to just  replace mine every three years...  but ... Scots as I am ... I do install them on the riding John Deere , to live out their life in grass mowing ... SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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Just buy an AGM (Absorbed Gas Mat)battery. Install it and forget it. It will last for many years.
 
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