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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a Drag Specialties battery 2 years ago and it went bad after checking it in six months and got replaced for free. The second one has been on my bike since and still works great but after removing it I've found it has the same problem but now out of warranty and non replaceable. PROBLEm: the battery post crack where the lines bolt on. The lead or whatever that material is is too thin and cracks. It's like it was over tightened to the point of cracking it. I thought I was gonna be accused of that the first time but the shop just switched it out, no questions asked. Now it happened again as I took the battery out to do some wiring. I only ever use a phillips screwdriver to tighten it and never had a loosening issue or not charging. All in all the battery is still charging and holding a charge. A google search brought several complaints but I just put one link in since he explained the posts structure a little better.
My question is can or has anyone ever soldered these posts and what method would be used.
http://www.hdforums.com/forum/sportster-models/207319-drag-specialties-battery-warning.html
I'd like to try to repair it.
 

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Drag Specialties batteries are made by someone else and rebranded. You could try filling the posts with solder and drilling out the holes. Might get you a year or more before you have to do it again.
 

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When you try to fill the post with solder, make sure the old post are REAL clean to accept the new solder or you will have an open circut at the joint. One thing to think about is batteries are only good for two years. It doesnt matter what they say, dont get caught far out with a bad battery, it could ruin your day. been there done that.
 

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Soldering is an art and must be done correctly, as you were already told, to work correctly. The material has to be very clean to start with. I'd advise using flux as it helps conduct the solder to flow and adhere much better than without. The amount of heat must be high enough to allow the solder both to flow well and to bond the material being attached or fixed. Otherwise, you end up with a "cold joint" and poor bonding results.

Be careful soldering a lead/acid battery as they vent gases that don't mix well with direct heat sources. I'd be very hesitant to do that myself for just that reason. I'm sure people have done it successfully, but there's a risk to be considered. This could potentially ruin your day worse than being broken down somewhere.

You have nothing to lose by contacting Drag Specialties directly and stating your displeasure with their batteries and why. I've had some success contacting companies and expressing my feelings on poorly made products. I've never been known to mince words.
 

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I'd say bad idea. Solder gets pretty hot and that's a big area to heat. I wouldn't have thought a drip of hot solder would ignite a pan of oil but this happened to a coworker. Fire department had to be called and the shop was a mess. The last thing you want is battery acid all over the place. The risk vs. money isn't worth it.

You could try something like JB weld. I'm not sure if it's conductive but if you can keep the terminal contact area clean I don't see why it wouldn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The lead cage design for the post is too thin and not only breaks it distorts. I can get another year out of it. I'll do some research to find the solder. I was just wondering if anyone has done it successfully.
 

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If the solder or Jb fails, I wonder if you couldn't carefully drill and tap into the lower part? I'm not sure how much material is underneath.
 

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I once fixed a broken battery post on a CB550 with the modelling metal that my brother used to make die cast little soldiers from. It's harder than lead solder and works very well, can be drilled etc.
How I did it was by getting two sticks the same depth as the battery post and cutting U shaped notch out of the edge of each stick, so they mated together on the post. Heated the metal and poured it in the notch and when it cooled took the sticks away. Drilled the holes for the bolts with I think a 7 or maybe 8mm drill bit.
 

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HI Predator

It is possible to solder lead, however the heat is critical. If you use too much heat the lead will become "Putney"( I think that is the phrase). Much like any alloy. This is Where the metal just goes soft and falls apart. I am trying to remember these facts from my school days, ( a long time ago ) LOL.

I wouldn't try it!!. Hope this helps.

Regards Paul
 

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Get a good agm battery and put in a complaint to drag specialties, tell them you want your money back as their batteries are junk if 2 have done the same thing as well as the other complaints on the Google search.

Battery acid Burns are not fun. Nor worth the risk.

You have been warned more then once. But it's your face and body.
 

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By the time you get that battery post hot enough to accept new fresh solder, it will be very close to melting.

You might be able to squeeze fit a repair, but I would not attempt to solder it.
My background is electronics repair and soldering was my specialty.

That battery post is well fixed to a very heavy lead plate below it.
The heat transfer from that post to the plate below it will absorb most of the heat from the soldering iron.

I don't think the reward is worth the risk.
 

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By the time you get that battery post hot enough to accept new fresh solder, it will be very close to melting.
Which would be called welding not soldering.
Not to be ignored is the fact the heat involved would likely melt the plastic case of the battery.
 

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good point Ken, I "knew that" but did not state as much.

Doubtful that the plastic case material could withstand the heat of getting the battery post hot enough to actually solder it.

glob on some solder? yes, but the joint will be subject to oxidation quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
After looking at an old battery I never threw out from another bike, I can see the thickness of the post material is alot thinner on the Drag Specialty.

I like Heffo's idea with the modeling metal, no heat needed. It has been a reliable battery overall and I should be able to get one more year out of it. Now where the heck do I find 'modeling metal'....

Thanks for all the input though.
Al
 
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