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Well, I did this job in teh Spring, but now it needs to be done again, as there has been a slow leak from this area since I finished the job. I have endured a small leak all summer but feel the need to repair.

I used a K&L gasket set with RTV to do this but now I was wondering if there is a better gaket and a better method. I assume the need to scrape down the case to a nice clean layer, but is there anything else that a guru might like to pass along for the successful completion of this job - for a second time?

Thanks!
 

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Not much else you can do, clean things down, use a very thin coat of gasket compound and bolt her up with an opposing pattern. I like to use #2 Permatex, the soft setting kind. If you put a very light coat of the stuff on the gasket and stick it to the cover and let it dry it will make it easier to keep the gasket in place. Just put a thin coat on the other side before assembling. It's old fashioned I know, but I do like Permatex.
 

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When I prep a surface for a gasket, I use a dremel tool with an abrasive wheel (much like scotch brite) to REALLY clean the surface.



The I assemble. generally with out any gasket compound. But the compound won't hurt anything either.........
 

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I like to use gasket compound on large or complicated, gaskets and those that are diffcult to keep in place. I like hi-temp grease on small ones and o-rings. O-rings especially need a bit of lube to keep from getting nicked when being installed. Hi-temp greas is good 'cause it's usually thicker and holds things better than general purpose stuff.
 

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Cheap paint stripper will also soften up the gasket and make it easier to scrape off. I usuallu rub the mating faces with some 400 grade wet & dry paper, until I see the bright surface come through.
 

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Right angle diegrinder, with 3" Scotch-Brite pad, is awsome. Done many a Cat/Cummins engine with those. You haven't lived till you have to discard gaskets glued on with Cat cement!! 1 1/2 pad would be more appropriate, for aluminum.
 

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I have also found that OEM gaskets and O rings work better than after-market... my leak came from where I gouged the surface geting the cover off. I should have known better but was rushed.... but my leaking wing makes my harley feel right at home
 

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Has anyone used Mike from Florida (how's that for specific) who cuts gaskets on his computerized cutting machine? I'm curious about the quality of those.
 

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Should be pretty accurate if the set up was.
 

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sanfelice wrote:
Has anyone used Mike from Florida (how's that for specific) who cuts gaskets on his computerized cutting machine? I'm curious about the quality of those.

A few people up my way have used Florida mans gaskets and have been quite pleased with them.
 

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sanfelice: RTV, Room Temperature Self Vulcanizing rubber compound works well with rubber or some rubber synthetics but if the gasket has silicon or other compounds similar to the RTV the seal will finally fail beause it breaks down. Learned the hardway. Some gasket materials are impregnated with other compounds to resist heat and stretching but when glued with similar adhesive compounds they will fail so when buying ask what is good to seal, or glue them up with.
 
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