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RIP GL1200SEi !!!!!:lash::X:lash::X

I drove to college today and the bike will shift properly now (fixed since previous posts), but now it doesn't move. I can be in first gear shifting to second gear, it will shift ok, but when I give it more gas and the rps rev about 2k-4k it doesn't go any faster, in fact it slows down.

I looked in my Clymer service manual under troubleshooting, but it doesn't have anything that matches.

Luckily I was able to park it in a safe place, but its going to be dead for a long time, or until I win the lottery.

:gunhead:
 

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Don't give up so easily. It sounds like it may be the clutch or the final drive splines. Both are easily fixed, new clutch parts are available, you will have to hunt down the final drive parts used.
 

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Sad to say it sounds like the clutch fibers and steel plates might be burned up. Good way to tell is if the slipping started slowly and then got worse, then went all the way out.



Kurt
 

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If its the clutch plates, and they need to be replaced, don't you need to remove the engine? I was talking to the guys at 4seasonscycle and they said "A lot of people tend to not do ..... right and end up breaking the ...." and proceeded to say it is a 14 hour job to replace the clutch plates.

Is this something that I could tackle? I don't do well with mechanical, but I can build a computer with my eyes closed.

Kurt:

When it first started it would go ok, but as i drove longer it got worse and worse. After an hour+ in class i drove it again and it seemed ok at first, then got worse after i drove it more.
 

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If the clutch needs replacing the motor is going to have to come out of the bike. I'm sure there are a few folks that can do it faster than a shop. 14 hours for them might be with in reason. If you go that route you might as well have them check the condition of the stator....it's right there also.



Did you feel the or see the RPM's rev. at any other time before this??

Kurt
 

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Good chance it is the return hole in the clutch master cyl. plugged holding pressure on the clutch. Try loosening and re-tightening the banjo bolt where the hose connects to the MC to let the pressure off and see it works. Don't let the fluid get on the plastic or paint.
 

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Gone14s wrote:
Did you feel the or see the RPM's rev. at any other time before this??

Kurt
Today is the only time that the RPM's revved and it didn't accelerate. It felt like the clutch was still pulled in, but I feathered it with no change in result.
 

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DaveO430 wrote:
Good chance it is the return hole in the clutch master cyl. plugged holding pressure on the clutch. Try loosening and re-tightening the banjo bolt where the hose connects to the MC to let the pressure off and see it works. Don't let the fluid get on the plastic or paint.
I do remember youhaving a problem with your master cyln and bleeding it off.



I going to side with Dave on this. It might bethat your still having a problem with the clutch master.

I would do as Dave said, crack the banjo nut loose at the master. See ifthe clutch feels like it should after words.It could belike Dave said, as you keep using the clutch to shift it keeps building pressure. After a while it build enough pressure too keep the clutch on and wont release.





Kurt
 

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Check your PM....



Kurt
 

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The clutch master cylinder was rebuilt and the lines bled, it was about 2 hours of service billed. So I think the cheaper thing would be to check the banjo nut (I think saw where it was in the engine removal video on this site).

the clutch lever is more difficult to pull initially, but once it gets closer to the grip it is less tight. Is that about how it should be?
 

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Mine is even all the way through the pull. I'm going to side with them on saying at least check the banjo bolt before you pull the engine to replace the clutch. Check the simple things first before just throwing money at it.
 

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The banjo bolt I was referring to is on the clutch master cylinder. Easy to get to for checking my theory. The lever probably will not feel much different if that is the case. The master may have been rebuilt but that does not mean the return hole was cleaned out, it is very small. I can't even see it without my reading glasses on.
 

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Even if you do have to pull the engine, it is not the end of the world. I had mine tore down so far that with a couple more hours work and I could have gotten it out. The Goldwing is a lot easier than a lot of other bikes to get the engine out of, because you can simply remove one side of the frame, and drop it out the bottom. I've removed and reinstalled air cooled VW engines about 20 times. It may look intimidating, but if you take your time, it's not that big of a deal.

But I would look at other things before pulling the engine to replace the clutch.


"I was talking to the guys at 4seasonscycle and they said "A lot of people tend to not do ..... right and end up breaking the ...." and proceeded to say it is a 14 hour job to replace the clutch plates"

Don't listen to that, they are just trying to scam you. I almost gave up on mine several times, but I think (I hope) I'm past the worst of it. But if at some point I wind up having to pull the engine, I'll do it.
 

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DaveO430 wrote:
The banjo bolt I was referring to is on the clutch master cylinder. Easy to get to for checking my theory. The lever probably will not feel much different if that is the case. The master may have been rebuilt but that does not mean the return hole was cleaned out, it is very small. I can't even see it without my reading glasses on.

Dave I think your right on the money!

I think the return hole is pluged.


Once the bike sits for awhile he is able to start the bike and it will move again.



Your theory works for me. As he uses the clutch to shift up and down it builds pressure and wont disengage. After it sits for a while the pressure bleeds off and the clutch works again.


Kurt
 

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the banjo bolt being referred to is the one on top at the clutch master cylinder, you will need to be riding when you try this, it can be very dangerous so be careful but take a wrench wih you and when it stars slipping put the wrench on it and just loosen it without stopping and see if the clutch engages, if it does return home or to your shop tat "fixed" it and have them redo the job
 

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sctrucker wrote:
the banjo bolt being referred to is the one on top at the clutch master cylinder, you will need to be riding when you try this, it can be very dangerous so be careful but take a wrench wih you and when it stars slipping put the wrench on it and just loosen it without stopping and see if the clutch engages, if it does return home or to your shop tat "fixed" it and have them redo the job
Good Lord man are you serious-sounds like a recipe for a crash. While I don't disagree with the diagnosis, wouldn't there be a safer way to prove the theory. Metal99, what if any types of facilities do you have where the bike is parked?
 

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Can you just put it on the center stand in the garage, go through the gears a few times to build up pressure then get off to work on banjo? Just looking for a safer way to check it out
 

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That sounds alot safer than wrenchin while ridin.You could also use your rear brake to load the motor and see if the clutch continued to slip.
 

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sctrucker wrote:
the banjo bolt being referred to is the one on top at the clutch master cylinder, you will need to be riding when you try this, it can be very dangerous so be careful but take a wrench wih you and when it stars slipping put the wrench on it and just loosen it without stopping and see if the clutch engages, if it does return home or to your shop tat "fixed" it and have them redo the job
:ROFL::ROFL:.........thats all I got to say.



I talked to john on the phone. Once he gets the bike back to his house we will have it up and running in a few minuts.



Kurt
 
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