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81 Interstate keeps blowing signal an brake light fuse, was wondering if maybe could it be the flasher causeing this, the reason I ask this is last Sunday I was out for a ride an the signal made a clickclickclick sound an I thought that was kinda wierd, used the signals quite a few times after that an all was fine till later on, stopped at a stop sign an the signal stopped working, pulled over checked, blown fuse, changed it an want on my way, Two days later took the bike to work didn't use the signals 6 o'clock in the morning no traffic, left work went to turn right at stop sigh again blow another fuse changed it, drove home went to put left signal on nothing, blow another, just seems strange sitting here in the yard you can leave Them flash forever, was wondering if anyone else has had this same problem. Thanks Mr. C
 

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maybe its the brake light with a short? try hitting the brake for a few seconds in the yard
 

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I had a similar problem with a customers bike. Turned out the power lead to a turn signal light socket had popped off and was touching a ground. Every time the signal was turned on the fuse blew. Something to check.
 

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sctrucker wrote:
maybe its the brake light with a short? try hitting the brake for a few seconds in the yard
sctrucker I tried that, thinking maybe when I was stopping might have something to do with it.



Thanks.
 

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Mr. C. I don't know if your bike used the old bimetal mechanical flasher unit or not. If so, the fast clicking you heard was probably the result of a shorted power lead going to one of the signal lights. The flasher was designed to be in series with a bulb before it gets to ground. If the bulb were elliminated due to a pinched or otherwise grounded power wire the bimetal flasher would heat and warp much more quickly which could account for the increased flash frequency. It would fail soon ifoperated under those conditions for any length of time. If you have trouble tracking it down I'm pretty sure I could help with a good one-on-one description of the problem and an accurate schematic. Use an ohm meter to check the signal's power wire to ground. It sould be at least a couple dozen ohms because of the bulb. Otherwise you have a grounded wire.
 

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rayworx wrote:
I had a similar problem with a customers bike. Turned out the power lead to a turn signal light socket had popped off and was touching a ground. Every time the signal was turned on the fuse blew. Something to check.
rayworx, I changed all the bulbs thinking you never know, an everything looked fine but might not hurt to exam them again even closer.



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TominDallas wrote:
Mr. C. I don't know if your bike used the old bimetal mechanical flasher unit or not. If so, the fast clicking you heard was probably the result of a shorted power lead going to one of the signal lights. The flasher was designed to be in series with a bulb before it gets to ground. If the bulb were elliminated due to a pinched or otherwise grounded power wire the bimetal flasher would heat and warp much more quickly which could account for the increased flash frequency. It would fail soon ifoperated under those conditions for any length of time. If you have trouble tracking it down I'm pretty sure I could help with a good one-on-one description of the problem and an accurate schematic. Use an ohm meter to check the signal's power wire to ground. It sould be at least a couple dozen ohms because of the bulb. Otherwise you have a grounded wire.
TominDallas, I would say by the sound of things, I will get my buddy who is more mechanical inclinded with this stuff than I am to have a look at it.



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Well this morning just for the heck of it I took the flasher out of my old truck just to try it, so far so good, I took the bike up to my Mom's to mow her lawn an on the way up an back I turned the signals on quite abit an still working, going for a longer ride with some friends an we'll see how that goes.



Mr. C
 

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Mr. C wrote:
Well this morning just for the heck of it I took the flasher out of my old truck just to try it, so far so good, I took the bike up to my Mom's to mow her lawn an on the way up an back I turned the signals on quite abit an still working, going for a longer ride with some friends an we'll see how that goes.



Mr. C
I have seen components that short only in motion due to moisture inside of them sloshing around at diferent angles so yes a flasher could cause this problem. You could plug the old back it and roll it side to side or tap it to see if fuse blows that would further prove it. Another possibility is a wire chafed or pinched beneath the seat that shorts with the weight of a rider intermittent. Hopefully you solved it with the flasher just something to consider...
 

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wingsam41 I had a young woman at work ask me to look at her headlamp circuit. It was non working. I found a schematic and started working though it. When I got to the power relay on top of the fender well, I found that it was completely packed with dead fire ants. I've always wondered what made those ants crawl so far into that car and pack themselves into that relay like kids used to do in phone booths. Magnetic fields? I dunno.
 

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Was out for about a 3 hour cruise on some scenic roads lots of bumps an dippy do's an so far so good. :)



Mr. C
 
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