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I am finally going all the way.... Tires that is and going 'double darkside' all at once.



I just ordered the Pilot Activ rear for the front and the Austone for the tail end. The spare wheel I bought had no brake rotor so I ordered one of those today, too (expensive day, but the Pilot and the rotor have free shipping, and the tire was on sale). As for the bolts to hold it on the wheel, what should I use? Loctite is a given, but for the bolts can I use hardware store stainless steel bolts or is there another recommendation? Torque value?



Thanks!

Rich

As a side note- I have seen conflicting info on this: The 2000 has the 5-pin rear drive flange; are they greased or dry upon assembly? Clymer says dry, but others say differently.
 

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I can't recommend any substitute bolts. When I got my spare I orderd replacment boltsfrom the dealer. They weren't cheap, but I didn't have to try to match something up. I think they were about 3 bucks each ormaybe4.That wouldmake it between $18 and $24 for a set of6. Not cheap, but not really that bad when you consider you are going to spend a couple hours trying to match something up, and you are still going to spenda few dollarsanyway.

The OEM ones come with some plastic material on the threads to keep them tight, so if you do substitute, be sure to puta dab of loctite on the threads.

I have always done my pins dry. I put that on my website and I have had several people tell me that there isn't any harm in greasing the pins. So it seems that you can do it either way.

The reason is that on the older bikes the metal cups that the pins slide into were permanently mounted, so you greased them to get as much life as possible out of them. But on the newer bikes, the cups are replaceable. On the other hand, if you grease them when it isn't needed, it makes them tacky and they tend to gather more dirt. I don't know if there is any other advantage to running them dry.
 

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Haynes shop manual says lube 88 and 89 only. 1990 and newer should be dry.
 

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Oh - THAT guy...
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I think I did mine almost dry last time because of the question/differing information -- very little on a rag so there was an extreme light coat on them, almost dry.
Perhaps I will stay that way.
As for the bolts from a dealer, my only issue is the lack of a dealer. Maybe I will get them from a MC supply store in town or something. We used to have a large dealer in town, but they have shrunk to very small, no showroom. And Eugene has 150k people in it. And this dealer REALLY messed up the bike when they repaired it after hitting my deer. I have a hard time trusting anything they do. As it is I still have no licence plate light - it is just gone - nothing to put a bulb in. Our local dealer did that during their repair. Maybe I will just get them on-line.
Thanks all!
 

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I have a set if you want used. Send a pm on ship info.
Welcome to the darkside! Be sure a take a ride to Wisconsin and see rail32(gl1800riders.com) for your darksider cookies, his wife makes the best! I got mine this past Sept. Well worth the ride.
 
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