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I've just replaced the 3 OEM brake bleeders with Speed Bleeders. No problem on the front two but on the rear I can't get the bleeder to seat and seal. I hand threaded it so I wouldn't cross threads and I've tightened it as much as I dare. When I press on the brake pedal fluid comes out the bleeder as if I had it wide open. I exhanged it with one of the new ones from the front and still a problem. And annoyingly, when I put the original OEM bleeder valve back it IT leaks now!!

The original was very difficult to remove. Perhaps the P.O. or a mechanic cross-threaded it?

As a temporary fix can I put in a metric bolt wrapped with Teflon tape?
 

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Did you try wrapping the threads on the speed bleeder with teflon tape?



Dusty
 

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Teflon tape wouldn't help the bleeder. It's not bottoming out when I screw it in. It may be because there is corrosion at the bottom of the bleeder hole in the caliper. How would I clean this out? It's not flat-bottomed but v-shaped to match the bleeder valve.
 

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What William says; not sure if he is saying dust or dirt.
You may have just pushed some crud down from the threads since the original was hard to remove.
I believe I would take a large needle, scribe, or something with a point on itto scratch around lightly in the taper bottom to see if something will come out.
If you use a bolt, thread it in partly,then while someone presses the pedal to force fluid out, tighten the bolt.
If you can't get the bleeder to seat and seal I suggest that you start looking for a replacement caliper. The bolt deal will just be a headache next time you have to work on the brakes.
 

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I have had luck cleaning out and cleaning up the bottom of the seat, Where the bleeder seats.

Grab the proper size drill and just using your hand gently push down and rotate drill bit.

If you have a Tri-Box of Drills, This is Letters, Numbers and Fractions. You can get just the size you want without touching the side threads.

A standard drill is 118 degrees at the end and an Aircraft Style drill will be 135 degree split point. That is what I used, But being a Machinist I have tons of drill bits to choose from.

What you want is a clean unbroken place for the bleeder to seat without leaking.

Good Luck

Mohawk
 

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A little compressed air in the hole won't hurt to blow it out,loosen any stuff???
 
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