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Hi all!

I am going to need to replace the brake lines on the 83' GL1100A that I am rebuilding and am wondering if anybody has an opinion on the pro's and con's of stock rubber brakes hoses vs. the stainless steel braided type.

If anybody knows where I could get good (or at least better than Honda dealership prices) for them (rubber and or stainless steel braided) please pass along the links.

Also - does anybody have any experience in crimping your own brake lines? or is that something best left to the expert?

Thanks,

Brandon
 

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brandonscaldwell wrote:
Hi all!

I am going to need to replace the brake lines on the 83' GL1100A that I am rebuilding and am wondering if anybody has an opinion on the pro's and con's of stock rubber brakes hoses vs. the stainless steel braided type.

If anybody knows where I could get good (or at least better than Honda dealership prices) for them (rubber and or stainless steel braided) please pass along the links.

Also - does anybody have any experience in crimping your own brake lines? or is that something best left to the expert?

Thanks,

Brandon
Brandon, the big advantage to stainless over conventional rubber is brake feel. The stainless have firmer walls so swell much less under hard brake pressure.. The original rubber are not too awfully bad when new but do degrade quite a bit as the years pass. What happens is; the rubber walls starts to flex under pressure so absorbs some of the brake fluidpressure & that can cause long lever or pedal travel with the lever traveling right to the bar at hard braking.. You get a much better feel of what is happening brake wise with the stainless..

I have a friend that races go carts (like real fast 150shifter mph go carts) & he just hadnew stainless lines made for his cart (comparable in length tomotorcycle) & the price wasn't to bad.. I had him ask about doing MyHonda & they said probably not too bad.. It's the end fittings not the line or crimping that can get expensive..

I did my Harley last year & really like the feel so plan on doing my 1200 Honda this winter during lay-up..

Twisty
 

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I'd leave the fabrication of brake lines to the folks who have the experience and equipment. The cost of fabrication doesn't add all that much to the cost of the materials. As for rubber vs. SS, it's mostly a matter of how much you want to spend, the SS are superior, especially for racing where the bike is pushed close to it's limits. On the other hand the rubber lines on your '83 are probably original and have lasted for over twenty years.
 

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Brandon: I'min the same position with my 1984 GL1200A. The trouble is, Honda no longer supplies stock brake lines for my 'Wing. One option would be removal of all the lines and fittings and having a local shop make up a new set for me.Finding a used set from somewhere doesn't really get me too excited. I suppose I could search out a source for stainless but they would need full and correct dimensions plus measurements for the correct fittings. In any event, the lines will have to come off. Good thing we've got six months of no riding coming up!
 

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I had to replace my front brake lines on my 82 1100A and could not find anyone around here to make me a set.. I went to JP cycles HEREand they carry "premade" lenghts and just apply the proper angled banjo ends.. If I remember correct it was around $50 (USD) per side for SS..
 

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Unfortunately, Paragon doesn't sell direct to the public anymore as far as Goldwing brakeline kits. www.vencowings.com does carry the Adirondack(Paragon)SS lines but at double what Paragon used to charge.

I do like the difference in the feel. Very solid and plus they should last a long time.

Hobie
 

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On my CB900C I put the front and rears on the bike, the front makes a big difference, but you probably will not feel much of a difference on the rear. It's still a good idea to replace the rear, but posibly just use rubber there.

I've seen the stock brake lines on a Honda Rancher go pretty soft in about 5 years. I didn't know how bad they were until I ran a new 06 rancher. I want to get BSS lines on that one.

I'm having some fun looking around at the brakes for my LTD, looks like a fun job on that bike. I don't even know how the brakes are setup on it. I am going to wait until I have the bike in my hands before I get the new parts. I'm thinking that I'll split the brakes and have a full front and full back, not the mixed.

The clutch line should also be replaced at the same interval as the brake lines. The force of the clutch might not be as much, so buldge will not be as bad, but it is still taking force from the clutch where you need it.
 

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I know that Russell Performance sells build your own brake line kits. The hoses come with crimped ends and a coupling so you can attach the fitting that you want.

Look in the J&P catalog, I think that they sell them.
 

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There is a place in Winnipeg MB close to where I work that makes hydraulic hoses and such. They had a sales rep come by and show us some stainless braided lines that they can fabricate. They make alot of brakehoses for guys doing suspensionlifts on 4 wheel drives and such. I asked him about lines for goldwings, and he said they pretty much need a sample of the old ones to see what configuration of ends they have to be able to make up a set. The prices were reasonable like around approx $30-$50 each. If you have some downtime like over the winter you could send them yours and they can see what they can do.

The place is called:

Westcan Hydraulic Lines

Winnipeg MB

204-772-7927

They've been in business for over 40 years.

Good luck
 

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quakeholio wrote:
On my CB900C I put the front and rears on the bike, the front makes a big difference, but you probably will not feel much of a difference on the rear. It's still a good idea to replace the rear, but posibly just use rubber there.

I've seen the stock brake lines on a Honda Rancher go pretty soft in about 5 years. I didn't know how bad they were until I ran a new 06 rancher. I want to get BSS lines on that one.

I'm having some fun looking around at the brakes for my LTD, looks like a fun job on that bike. I don't even know how the brakes are setup on it. I am going to wait until I have the bike in my hands before I get the new parts. I'm thinking that I'll split the brakes and have a full front and full back, not the mixed.

The clutch line should also be replaced at the same interval as the brake lines. The force of the clutch might not be as much, so buldge will not be as bad, but it is still taking force from the clutch where you need it.
quakeholio, you have to be very careful in splitting the old GoldWing brakes into full front rear systems.. The rear isn't a problem (just block off the front channel) but the front can be a challenge.. In stock form the handlebar master cylinder only operates one brake caliper, if you ask it to handle two calipers is doesn't have enough capacity if the pads kick in a little or you need full stroke.. You could end up at times with the lever hitting the stop but not enough brake pressure to stop the wheel.. To be safe in all circumstances you will probably need the front master cylinder from an earlier twin front Honda system..

Twisty
 

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I had a set built for my 83 . Drove to the shop and removed them to use as patterens . Put the new ones on /bleed and drove home . About 1.5 hrs and under $200.00 . have been pleased with them . Thats SS with a dark see thru rubber chaffing cover ,not quite asvisually impressive as visible SS braid . This was at a professional hydraulic hose shop. He had all the end parts in stock .
 

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Thanks for the info. I should have plenty of miles to figure out what I think of the setup before I tear it down. I wouldn't mind having new brake lines for the ride, but I don't want to have the risk of new untested parts on a 1400 mile run.
 
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