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I have a basket-case 78 GL1000 that i am restoring. It sat for approximately 17 years and was complete but in generally poor condition. I completely disassembled it and have begun the restoration process.

Once I removed the heads, cam belt covers, cam belts and pulleys, carbs etc. It became evident that it was "stuck" and would not turn over. I wasn't surprised.

I have "un-stuck" engines before so it usually is just a case of surface rust between the rings and cylinders. The last GL1100 I did was freed up with aBFPW (Big Freakin Pipe Wrench) and a little patience by turning the pulley on the end of the crank. On the GL1000 all that did was trash the pulley, key, and nearly the crank end.So I scratched my head a bit to find some way to get more torque on the crank shaft.

So here's what worked for me. I took a small length (about 8 inches) of steel angle iron and drilled three holes in it. The outer two should be the exact distance between two of thefour head bolts for a cylinder. Picka cylinder that is about half way between the bottom of its stroke and the top of it's stroke. Take about one foot of 1/2 inch threaded rod and bend it90 degrees about mid way. take a 1/2 inch nut andspot weld it over the middle hole. Run the threaded rod down into the nut. Now you have a tool you can bolt over the top of the piston directly to the case.Put a small piece of metal, wood, or other hard material right on top of the piston and tighten down on the tool. This will apply direct force to the top of one of the pistons to beak it loose. Oh yeah, might want to spray some lubricant ineach cylinder on top of the pistn and let it sit overnight. I laid the bikeover and filled it to the top with penetrant and let it sit a few hours.

It popped loose after about a quarter turn.

You may want to use square tubing though, the angle bent a little.
 

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Nice Tool ...

I used to work at a boat dealership and when we received sunken outboard engines that had been seized by sitting under the salt water of the atlantic ocean , we would drain everything and then fill every cylinder and the crank case with Marvel Mystery Oil and let sit for a week or more. We would flip the engine over every two days to move around the oil.

But we didn't have a cool tool like you made. when I could take off the heads without damage ,I would tap the cylinder tops with a piece of wood and a rubber malet, And if that didn't work then I would put the head back on and pour in more MMO and let it sit again. I always got the engine running again with very little damage to the engine. But you must be very patient and take your time.

Take Care - Jim
 

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Nice tool, I agree. I have used brake fluid, freed it, then changed the oil. Guess it depends on how stuck it is.
 

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Nice tool, I agree. A second similar tool on the other descending cylinder would would help distribute the stress better, but wow it would be important to make sure you were on the downward pistons.
If the heads are still on, soaking the cylinders and then rocking the rear wheel back and forth in a higher gear sometimes works.
 

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Great information!!!

I'll be darned if you're gonna hear me say "Nice Tool", though.

:shock:
 

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by your history, the wing has only run 13 seasons. That would make the engine a low mileage unit. I dont see any ring ridge in there. You might be fine with a really good flush, inside, new belts, mabey new valve guides & gently fire her up!?:baffled:
 

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Be careful when pushing on the piston. A couple of things can happen. If the top ring is rusted to the cylinder, you can break the top ring groove out. Also, the dome of the piston may be thinner in the center. You may end up punching a hole in it. Just don't rush it!

Good luck.

John
 

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my 1100 was also bit stuck but the old rocking trick helped it break free...but i like the tool.good thinking
 

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Great idea! Most of us have just used the penetrating oil, a shaved down 2X4 and a large mallet. Giving it a good wack from opposite sides of the engine over a course of a couple days to a couple weeks. They will break free as long as the lower rod bearings aren't siezed up.
Good luck
Later Rumple
 

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Along with using some penetrating oil/sea foam etc., I'm wondering why you couldn't put a piece of steel on top of the piston and then give it a short blast with an air hammer/chiesel ( with right end in the air hammer. )

You wouldn't need to put much pressure on the air hammer but you would be using the vibration to free up the cylinder/piston. Repeat on all pistons.

You might also be able to attach this piece of metal to the head via the head bolts. As long as the cylinder/block gets some vibration it should free up the piston.

Just a thought as it might save some other problems direct pressue ( hammer/mallet etc) can cause.
 
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