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Just got back from a 2000-mile trip with my '77 GL1000. Great trip, but wet. When washing the bike I found a broken spoke on the rear wheel, right side.

Anyone know of a source for new spokes and nipples without having to buy a kit for re-spoking the whole wheel?
 

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Marco, I'd suggest getting the spoke fitted by a wheel builder. My dad used to do this for a living and many of the wheels that were buckled had been buckled by DIY spoke fitters. It's a skilled job, just fitting a new spoke isn't enough as you need to adjust tension on about 5 or 6 other spokes as well to balance the tension. A wheel builder will have this done properly in a few minutes.
 

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englishted wrote:
Marco, I'd suggest getting the spoke fitted by a wheel builder. My dad used to do this for a living and many of the wheels that were buckled had been buckled by DIY spoke fitters. It's a skilled job, just fitting a new spoke isn't enough as you need to adjust tension on about 5 or 6 other spokes as well to balance the tension. A wheel builder will have this done properly in a few minutes.

I think I can handle replacing a spoke. I used to build bicycle wheels... not much different.
 

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Silicon Sam wrote:
Is this the place you're talking about? In my hometown, and I have been there...

http://www.brokenspokeaustintx.com/

Raymond

WellRay, I'm not much into square dancing... you just couldn't resist could you? So why do they call it the broken spoke? Is that where their wagon's wheel broke and they said, "oh what the heck, we'll just settle here"?
 

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axelwik wrote:
I think I can handle replacing a spoke. I used to build bicycle wheels... not much different.
You're a handy man to know, not many guys can build wheels. :)
 

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FitzAl wrote:
axelwik wrote:
I think I can handle replacing a spoke. I used to build bicycle wheels... not much different.
You're a handy man to know, not many guys can build wheels. :)
Building wheels is notthe black magic that everyone makes it out to be. It just takes some training and knowledge, and common sense. When I was younger I raced bicycles. Never got into frame-building, but built my own wheels. Also worked part-time in a bike shop.

Some people say that motorcycle wheels are different - they're not, only different in scale.

By the way, I finally broke down and ordered some spokes from Honda - at $5.25 apiece! Ouch!
 

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Don't underestimate yourself Marco. I know a few people tried fitting/adjusting spokes and they all made a hash of it. I think it's a case of "either you have it or you don't." You obviously have the skill that most lack.
 

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axelwik wrote:
I think I can handle replacing a spoke. I used to build bicycle wheels... not much different.
Well done Marco. It's a skill that comes in useful and not a lot of people can do it. My dad managed to make a good living all his life from building motorcycle wheels (he travelled round the local bike shops and they would have wheels ready for him to fix) and he was the only guy in the town that could do the job. The next nearest man who built wheels was about 50 miles away!
 

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englishted wrote:
axelwik wrote:
I think I can handle replacing a spoke. I used to build bicycle wheels... not much different.
Well done Marco. It's a skill that comes in useful and not a lot of people can do it. My dad managed to make a good living all his life from building motorcycle wheels (he travelled round the local bike shops and they would have wheels ready for him to fix) and he was the only guy in the town that could do the job. The next nearest man who built wheels was about 50 miles away!
I was thinking of Marco when I watched the Travel Channel the other night, they were at the HD factory and showed a guy lacing up a front wheel. I respoked a bicycle wheel before I had a driver's license but I think that would be easier since the spokes are long and more flexible. On the bike wheel it was only a matter of figuring out the pattern, getting the spokes in somewhat loose but all having the nuts run down about the same amount and then tensioning and truing which I did using the upsidedown bike for a truing stand. Took a bit of time but it came out alright.
 

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All it takes is practice. Not too hard to get the hang of if you're patient... and yes, bicycle wheels are a bit easier to lace since the spokes can be bent a bit easier.

You can bend motorcycle spokes too, then bend them back - might not have a choice when replacing a spoke in an already built wheel.They almost always fail where they make the 90-degree bend into the hub, so a little bending in the middle won't hurt since it's not the weakest point.
 
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