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Since I hadn't rode for over 40 years and I bought a 1500, I knew there would be no way I could pass the DMV riding test. I opted for the MSF at the local jr college using their nighthawks. I passed and then just had to take the written test which I passed for my class M.

For those interested, you can go to dmv.ca.gov and watch videos of people taking the test. They are a "what to do and what not to do"
during the test.

Carl
 

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When i took my first m/c lic. test many,many, many years ago, all you did was ride down the road, turn aroundn and come back,and you passed.

After failing to renew my lic.i had to retake the test with the new course on my 1200, other than the 180 deg. followed by a stop and then right turn, i had no problem, i passed .

Jim
 

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You expect the test-giving person to be a good rider, and give you a tip???

Wow - you expect a lot from a state employee.

Go get a smaller bike, don't use one of the largest on the market unless you just want to risk it for fun.
 

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Well after 20 years of not riding I had bought my GW and then took the WA driving test. I failed the first time, but learned the rules/tricks. I passed the second time with flying colors 2 weeks later.



Taking the driving test with the big GW is not easy, I was pissed when I found out I could have used a street legal "trail 50" for the exact same test.:lash:



No difference in licence.
 

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Like I said before the wheel base of a 1500 or 1800 won't fit in that roundabout they use in CA.. You might find a city whereDMV islax and lets you go over the lines.. Good Luck..

A trail bike is your best bet or the safety class.........
 

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Discussion Starter #26
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Thanks to everyone for the input! I'm going to go measure the circle diameter and configuration just for anyone's interest tomorrow. A Harley friend threw a curve at me. He said how can you stay within the lines when you can't see the front tire. He had a point. I'll measure the distance between the lines and report back.
Armo: waiting for you to help me do do a carb rebuild and sync! lol!:raspberry:
 

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Wouldn't it be nice if cagers were required to passan equivalent driving test, in their car?

 

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jeffy1500 wrote:
A Harley friend threw a curve at me. He said how can you stay within the lines when you can't see the front tire. He had a point.
If your going to watch your front tire in a curve, or 360 degree circle........ I suggest you stop pondering now and take the Motorcycle safety course............

Although your not being tough how to drive your bike, you are being tough techniques that carry through with all bikes, and how you maneuver and handle it. It will be the best money you'll ever spend on riding.
 

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+1 on what jobe05 say's you need to be looking at the center of the turn
wilf
 

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Watch the ride like a pro series....they break it down pretty well on what should be done in a turn. www.ridelikeapro.com should get you there.
 

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i have mentioned this book before, "maximum control, mastering your heavyweight bike", by pat hahn. excelent i've learned alot plus it has assignments to practice weely even for experienced riders. worth a look.
 

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I'd had a motorcycle endorsement for many years but some time during the last ten years I lived in Alaska it disappeared from my license during a renewal. I didn't have a bike at the time and didn't notice the loss. When I moved to WA and bought my SEI after being away from bikes for a quarter century I had to do the WA riding test. I was really worried watching a fellow on a 250 Rebel bust the course right ahead of me but I did manage to eke out a pass with the Goldwing. It was difficult to do the slalom but I managed somehow. There was a section where you had to accelerate to at least 20mph and then stop on a line. You should have seen the DMV guy get out of the way when my 'Wing wound up to almost 40mph before I hit the binders. I ended up stopped right on the marks. The DMV dude remarked how he didn't think such a big bike could get going that fast or stop as quickly as that one did. I actually was surprised that I passed their test and if I'd known I'd have rented a small bike, it would sure have been easier.
 

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jeffy1500 wrote:
:wtf:I think i can handle my big girl pretty damn well at all speeds  but this driving test seems  near impossible on a 1500 GW. How many Calif. folks have taken the DMV riding test on their Wings? Lots of folks are taking the riding test on smaller bikes and it pi**es me off to no end . A person should only be allowed to test on the bike they will be riding as far as I'm concerned! It's no wonder  so many 55 year old Harley and large bike  riders are listed in obituaries each month in the news paper around this area. At least 2-4 a month. That encompasses Central calif. from San Francisco to Bakersfield. What do the riding tests in other areas of the world consist of? Thanks!:stumped:

While stationed at Eaker AFB, Arkansas 1985; I was among a group of folks that became Certified MSF Instructors. There were two instructors that came all the way from California on their GL1200 Aspencades to certify us. We were provided with (compliments of Honda) 250 Customs with belt drives for the course bikes.
The certification was long and hard and some that started the training dropped out because of the riding demands. The two instructors were very critical and to the point. When it came time to do the "eight in the box," the majority of us found it next to impossible to do. (even on the Customs) After several "grumbling comments," from the peanut gallery, the elder instructor, obviously agitated, got on his Aspencade; took the course and nailed the eight in the box twice! Came back in; put the other instructor on the passenger seat and did the eight in the box again, twice! He then pulled up in front of all of students; came to a stop and held the bike still, for what seemed forever without putting a foot on the ground. "All being very humbled," we got on our "little scooters" and practiced; practiced; practiced and practiced some more. Man! those guys could ride those big bikes.
Norm
BTW: Not everyone passed, I happened to be one who did and went away feeling like I had really accomplished one of the more demanding things I had ever done. One finale thing...trying to do the eight in the box on my GL1500SE???
I'll have to practice; practice and practice some more.
:cool:
 

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When I gave away the MotoGuzzi I let my motorcycle endorsement lapse. 4 years later I bought the 1800 and took the Experienced Riders Course here in WA. I had the wing for about 2 weeks when I showed up for the course. All the other riders there were on 650's or smaller except for a guy on a 1200 BMW. We both passed the course without any issues and both of us used the smaller circles/u-turn lines.

The instructors were surprised the wing could make those kind of turns... learned how to ride the friction zone 35 years ago when I took the Navy's 5 day motorcycle safety course. Get the ride like a pro videos and practice. You will be amazed what using the brake and clutch along with moving your butt off the side of the seat will do for making tight turns. Practice, practice, practice.....practice!

Henry
 

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Took my test on a new Suzuki 850 shaft drive full dressed in Vetter fairing and bags and trunk. Was a big bike at the time.
I agree that some people should not be allowed to take test on 250 bike and go home and take off on a touring bike. I have heard that some dealers will provide you with small bike to test on if you buy the bigger bike from them.
 

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Foodman wrote:
The other why to get around the DMV test is to take a safety class.. You pass thatclass, you're in free.. No DMV riding test.........................
If it's anything like the one-day safety course I took here in Oregon, I'd highly recommend it! I got way more out of mine than simply passing the riding portion of the exam with a provided bike. (Not the least of which is a break on insurance premiums :cool:)
 

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The course that I took here in California, was 8 hours book training and 8 hours hands on. It cost $250.00 and was worth every penny.

Carl
 

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Took the course in Visalia. Easier that way - no grouchy, picky DMV employee to deal with. Go to any DMV office and practice on their course in the parking lot. I tried really quick on my wing and hard w/o putting foot down - and foot down is not good in their book.
 
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