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Just doing the rear brakes on my 84 Aspy. Couldnt get the rear pivot bolt loose so had to drive the couch down to the local garage and have a guy put a torch, then an air gun to it. It did come loose, thank God. I noticed when I got back home and removed the bolt that there was RED Lock-tite on the threads. Is this a good idea??

Should I use Anti-sieze on the treads when I put it all back together?? How bout the Blue Lock-tite?? I dont want to round off the head of the bolt in the future.

Mechanic told me to use the BlUE because its removal whereby the RED locks things up pretty good. He said the anti-sieze grease on the threads is not a good idea. Is he right?? He is a CARmechanic



thanks



Speedbird
 

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Your mechanic is right, usually blue lock for high tensile brake bolts regardless of what type vehicle. Someone else may have put red on in the past. I think red is usually reserved for suspension bolts. I'd suggest using the loctite instead of grease on the threads.
 

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Man, this is a brake job from Hell. Everything is so difficult. Bolts are way too tight. Cant remove the pad pins. Pistons are rusted. I really think this is the first pad replacement this couch has seen since 84



Speedbird
 

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I DO NOT use Locktight, I use anti sieze. Dont use grease as it will rot the dust covers.
 

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tricky wrote:
I DO NOT use Locktight, I use anti seize. Dont use grease as it will rot the dust covers.
Ditto on the locktight, I use anti seize since I don't want to repeat the performance in the future. The bike was originallyassembled without any thread locking compounds on those bolts so it shouldn't require any now. Once you get everything apart and cleaned take a good look at the pistons. If they have serious corrosion or pitting replace them. If you can't get them nice and smooth they will chew up the seals. Don't grease them some greases will eat the seals as Ted said and it also just holds dirt and grit. Lube them with brake fluid when you reassemble the caliper, likewise soak the piston seals and dust seals in brake fluid prior to reassembly, wipe out the caliper cylinders with fluid and make sure you get the seal grooves in the caliper clean, crud there can make the piston bind on the seal. A wire wheel on the bolt threads will get rid of the old Locktite nicely.
 

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I've been doing brake jobs on these bikes for more years than I can remember.. I always use antiseize on the threaded bolts.. If you torque the bolts to specs, you'll never have a problem. Use the stuff sparingly and if you need to take it apart again, it's a breeze... Antiseize does not affect torque set. In other words, the bolts will not back out of the holes after tightening..

DO NOT use antiseize on any of the brake pads, pins, pistons, rattle clips etc. :cooler:
 

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Loctite on brake bolts is overkill. Fine for suspension bolts but hardly needed for brakes. Copper/antisieze grease on bolts, pins etc. but not on the rubbers.
 

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I'm with the "no loctite" camp. It's hardly likely that the bolts will come loose without it.
 

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Honda obviously didn't think it was necessary since they didn't use it on the caliper bolts.
 

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I don't remember ever seeing loctite on my brake bolts either, someone probably palyed it safe on Speedbirds bike at some stage.
 
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