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Every since the Great Rally and Andy(along with Sir Slink calming my fears,thanks)trying to sync my carbs for me I have been guessing/wondering about that no#1 plug which had low to no compression showing on the sync guage.

When I changed plugs before the rally, I mentioned that a plug acted like it wanted to cross thread, but I didn't cross thread it. However I had to be gentle when placing the new plug in becouse it felt like I could spin the thread out if applied proper tourqe to it.

So my question is could this plug couse low compression in any way?

If so , how can I fix this myself, or is it a fix to be done by a shop?

I plan on doing alot as money will allow this winter, so this will have to be on my list of things to get done. New bike is not an option as money will be tighter this coming year:shock:

Thanks in advance, Ride Safe, Ray

:waving:
 

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Howdy Ray,

Yup, That could be the cause.

First you should check and make sure that it is the problem. Could be a head gaskit or valves.

While the bike is running, Grab a strong light and squirt some water down around the base of your plug. You may see bubbles or morelikley you will see your water be sprayed away. But some should get sucked into the cylinder too and start smoking white from that sides exhaust.

There are numerous fixes for this and Some are good, Some are bad.

I like the Helicoil. But some don't as some have had problems with the Helicoil being pushed into the cylinder with the plug.

But they have a locking Helicoil and I have never had them move for me and I have installed thousands of them. The locking heilicoil had an octagon thread halfway down that gets pushed into the parent material therby locking the whole helicoil into place. Of course there are some that use a thread locking compound for the helicoil. But Helicoils can be changed if you dont use a thread locking compound like Locktite.

The next big complaint about Helicoils for Plug sizes is the drive tang that gets broken off after installation. BUT the Plug sizer is so large that I reach down in with a pair of Medical Forceps and grap the tang and give it a couple of twists to break it off and remove the tang with the forceps.

You also have Keenserts, These are screwed into the new drilled and tapped hole then the stakes of the keensert get driven down into the head locking the insert into place.

With both, You have to redrill the Plug Hole the head to the proper size and then tap it to accept the insert.

I have done this numerous ways also.

Sitting on the ground and using a shop vac running constantly to remove all the chips as I drill and tap.

Have the bike on the lift and tipped on it's side as I drill from underneath and I still use the shop vac to grab any chips that may go into the cylinder.

I have even hung a bike from a set of chainfalls so I could drill from underneath.

There will be others by shortly with thier favorite methods.

Good Luck.

Mohawk
 

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I would think that if it's leaking enough to kill the compression, you'd hear it whuffing with every stroke of the crank.

You'd hear the difference.

Mike
 

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MDKramer wrote:
I would think that if it's leaking enough to kill the compression, you'd hear it whuffing with every stroke of the crank.

You'd hear the difference.

Mike
I'd tend to agree with that. And if it did that, the plug would probably leave soon thereafter as well.
 

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I thought the carb sync gauges showed vacuum, not compression...

I would start by buying a spark plug thread chaser, and using it carefully, you might save the threads.

If it came to Helicoil-ing or some other type of thread replacement, I would pull the head off, it is not that hard to do, and eliminates any nasty stuff from entering the motor.
 

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If the plug is losing compression, you will see and hear it escaping around the threads. Spray some water mixed with washing up liquid around the threads and spin the engine. If compression is escaping you will see the liquid bubble up.
 

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Ray, I remember (standing next to you at Calhoun) you saying that the adapter you use to hook up the vacuum sync gauge felt like it was stripped.

Are you talking about the vacuum test port on the #1 carb, or a spark plug?

I think the answers might be headed in the wrong direction?

But, I have had a lot of spark plugs loose on stuff I owned, and they have got to damn near be loose enough to fall out before they will effect compression enough to worry about.

As Mike said, you're going to hear a lot of chuffing going on before a spark plug becomes a problem.
 

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ob1quixote wrote:
I thought the carb sync gauges showed vacuum, not compression...
I was thinking the same thing, but he beat me to it. It seems to me that on the draw stroke of the cylinder, if it was drawing enough air in from the spark plug hole to cancel out the vacuum on the intake, that would be a lot of looseness on the spark plug. You could eliminate that just by grabbing the sparkplug and jiggling it. If the spark plug doesn't move, I don't see how it could leak that much air.
 

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When we were down at Calhoun, Andy (Lopeha) was using his carb sync gauges to help the guys out.

Ray at the time mentioned that he had trouble screwing in the port adapter, it felt like it wanted to cross thread.

So, based on that tid bit, I am assuming that we are talking about a vacuum leak here.

Maybe when Ray gets off work, he can straighten us all out.
 

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Hey guys,

checked plug does not wiggle or move any. Whilest down at the rally Sir Slink and I changed out some of the vacuum lines with new line. Seemed to help. The failed sync did improve my ride though!

AZgl1500


Maybe when Ray gets off work, he can straighten us all out:cheeky1:Someone needs to straighten me out first.

THere is no whoofing sound coming from the plugs.

I will add more once I get to work later tonight, 12 hour shift stink:shock:

Thanks, Ray

:waving:
 

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Just to save a big problem later. If the spark plug feels funny when you tighten it. Go ahead and repair the thread. I prefer the Keensertts. I have used them in several aluminum cylinder heads over the years. It is a permenant repair, and thread is a good as the factory thread. This may not be where the miss problem is but it will save the trouble of having to figure out how to fix it at the last minute before leaving on your next big trip, or worst finding a blown out plug thread 500 miles from home. There are a couple of tricks in doing it without getting the fileings in the cylinder. Send me a PM
 

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Pull all plugs, do a proper compression test and if possible a leak down test. Test coils, ignition wires, Put a dab of anti-sieze on plug threads and hand screw in and snug down. Your answer will pop up doing these tests.:waving:
 

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My opinions, backed by experience; Aluminum heads can strip, so can cast iron, but less likely. A thread chaser is a great tool and will keep plugs from stripping. Clean threads don't strip as easily as dirty ones. If a spark plug is not tightened to the proper torque, it will let carbon blow up into the threads and can strip. If a plug won't take the proper amount of torque, it is already stripped, and must be repaired or it will probably blow out. If you don't have a thread chaser you can make one out of a used plug ground like a tap to allow carbon a place to go. I use anti-sieze on all my spark plugs. Some say don't but I do. Amen, synch gages measure vacuum.
 

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Guys, how about tigging and retap. Sure, the head would need to come off, but why not?
 

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Thanks everyone alot of great info and advice:cool:

I will get back to you all once I have done as suggested:)

:bowing:This is why this place works like it does, folks like you all sharing and helping another:bowing:

Ride Safe, Ray

:waving:
 

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:waving:Installing New Spark Plugs:Thread the plugs into the cylinder head by hand to avoid crossthreading. Tighten by hand then tighten them an additional 1/2 turn with a spark plug wrench to compress the washer.

The above is from the Honda '80-'83 GoldWing Service Manual and is a practice I've followed since the first plug changeI did on my '83 Interstate in 1983. You'll never crossthread a spark plug by following the above procedure.

Image below is from the maintenance section of the '80-'83 Honda GoldWing Service Manual.
 

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83GoldWinger wrote:
:waving:Spark Plug Installation: Thread the plugs into the cylinder head by hand to avoid crossthreading. Tighten by hand then tighten them an additional 1/2 turn with a spark plug wrench to compress the washer.

The above is from the Honda '80-'83 GoldWing Service Manual and is a practice I've followed since the first plug changeI did on my '83 Interstate in 1983. You'll never crossthread a spark plug by following the above procedure.
Just remember the half turn is only for new plugs . If its a used plug( the gasket has already been crushed once) a 1/4 turn is all you need. The preferred method would be a torque wrench. Torque to 12 ft=lb or 16 Newton meters
 

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Oh, I just remembered something that may help y'all. The plugs aren't exactly easy to grip down there especially with my big hands. Get a short piece of hose, 6 inches or so, that fits snugly over the porcelean of the plug. Use it to thread the plug into the hole. The hose will pull off after the threads engage. It also works to remove the plug from the recessed area.
 

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Why can't a guy just use a plug socket on an extension turned between his fingers?

Mike
 

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Yep, a plug socket, extension and my fingers, one addition I have a regulare16mm deep socket that I added a rubber washer to and shoved it up into the socket so it "grips" the plug tip when the plug is shoved into it..so it doesn't fall out when I put the socket/plug down into the head.

Real plug sockets already have the rubber thing in there but they cost an extra $5..for that .10 grommet.

But I like the rubber hose idea too!!!:dude:
 
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