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Well, I'm the new owner of an old wing. It's an '85 Aspencade with all the bells and whistles, and only 95,000 miles! (and a bad spedometer drive gear). This is my second wing, I had a '78 GL1000 a few (many) years ago. This bike had sat for 2 years when I bought it and after running carb cleaner in a few tanks of gas, I think carb removal and cleaning is in the near future. My question is are there any adjustnets that will improve milage or performance?
I have read about turning the pilot screw out an extra half turn, and shimming the slide needle up about .020". Anything else I should do?
And what about the air cutout valve, what does this valve do? How can I tell if it is just starting to go bad?
One last thing, do I really need a 4 gauge set for balancing the carbs, or will a 2 gauge set work OK? From what I read, you balance each side, then balance the two sides thgether. I am thinking of building a 2 gauge set with dampening valves.
Oh, and by the way, WHAT A GREAT SITE!!
 

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Welcome johnmac. A two gauge setup will do fine. I´d be more inclined to clean the carbs up first and leaving the settings as they are so I can see how well it runs, before changing settings at all. Otherwise it might be a headache trying to determine if a later problem is down to a dirty carb or someting you did yourself while tinkering.
 

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johnmac wrote:
My question is are there any adjustments that will improve mileage or performance?
I have read about turning the pilot screw out an extra half turn, and shimming the slide needle up about .020". Anything else I should do?
And what about the air cutout valve, what does this valve do? How can I tell if it is just starting to go bad?
One last thing, do I really need a 4 gauge set for balancing the carbs, or will a 2 gauge set work OK? From what I read, you balance each side, then balance the two sides thgether. I am thinking of building a 2 gauge set with dampening valves.
Oh, and by the way, WHAT A GREAT SITE!!
johnmac, asked...

My question is are there any adjustments that will improve mileage or performance?----Yes, but it's a trial & error ordeal with lots of back to back testing & riding record keeping. Sorry no silver bullet that I know of.

I have read about turning the pilot screw out an extra half turn, and shimming the slide needle up about .020". Anything else I should do?---- I have done both on my personal 1200 Wing, while it now runs great with absolutely no hesitation, sags or popping, I believe I have lost a little MPG. I'm still tracking the MPG as I ride all weather & in traffic so getting a good MPG reading is very hard without averaging multi runs. I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range (no decent mileage there). Other things that might help mileage is a new free flow air filter & using a thinner base synthetic engine oil. Keeping the tires inflated & brakes from dragging also improves MPG. Set the carbs back up to the original specs first, then once "as original" you can play with the carb & needle settings to see what if any improvements can be made. Carb float settings are critical on those Honda carbs.

And what about the air cutout valve, what does this valve do? How can I tell if it is just starting to go bad?----The air cut-off valve cuts the air flow off to the pilot jet circuit on decel & high vacuum condition... Basically when you are riding along at mid throttle, then drop the throttle (close the throttle suddenly) the engine manifold vacuum goes high, at the same time the carb throttle valve closes so that means the air flow in the carb/manifold drops to almost nothing. What that does is makes the remaining mixture in the manifold go LEAN... What the air-cut-off valve (or valves on early Wings) does is momentarily shuts the air supply off to the pilot jet airside (blocks off the pilot jet air jet) so the decel manifold mixture goes somewhat rich, that rich mixture is there to keep the popping out of the exhaust system on decel & high vacuum over-run conditions. There are about 3 ways the air cut-off system can fail. (1)- the cut-off valve diaphragm starts leaking.. Than causes a lean condition on decel or erratic operation/

(2)-the air cut-off valve diaphragm gets old & hardens up. That can cause all kinds of problems as it now won't react to thevacuum signal correctly & can cause either low air flow to the pilot jet circuit & therefore a rich carb mixture (poor mileage, fouled spark plugs, probably won't need the enrichener valve for more than a few seconds at start up),, or a lazy valve so you don't get proper decal air cut-off.

(3) a plugged air inlet to the idle air cut-off system. That will give a rich carb mixture (poor mileage, fouled spark plugs, probably won't need the enrichener valve for more than a few seconds at start up).. No air to the pilot jets really richens the low speed mixture & gives terrible fuel economy, rich blubbering at low throttle settings, bad exhaust smell at idle, etc.


do I really need a 4 gauge set for balancing the carbs, or will a 2 gauge set work OK? From what I read, you balance each side, then balance the two sides thgether. I am thinking of building a 2 gauge set with dampening? ----No, 4 gauges aren't really needed,I only use a single gauge for carb balance. You will need to make a gauge manifold set up with 4 shut-off valves in it (or at least 3 valves for a 2 gauge set-up). You will need to pre-run all 4 vacuum hoses from the engine manifoldsto the balancegauge(s) as removing any vacuum lines during the balance operation will upset the idle & cause an inaccurate carb balance. If using two gauges you should have a valve set-up so you can read both gauges from the master carb atthe same time to verify accuracy between the two gauges, then be able to switch that second gauge to any of the remaining carbs as you will want to repeatedly switch between the carbs as the vacuum changes during the balance operation.

Twisty
 

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Welcome johnmac..

You canbalance the carbs witha twounit vacuum guage to adjust the carbs, but in my opinion, it's easier with the 4 guages. It's important to adjust the pilot screws first and set them according to the repair manual specs. Then, balance the carbs equally. #4 carb is the base and not adjustable. If all parameters are set correctly, the engine will purr and perform thru all operating ranges with optimal fuel economy.

Should the mixture be too lean, the engine will starve for fuel and cause poor power performance, backfire and lag... If too rich, it will drink gas like a thirsty drunk... A lean mixture will cause higher engine temps and possible damage to the pistons and valves.. Too rich and carbon build up will occur. Let's face it,, Honda engineers designed these bikes for performance in all throttle ranges..

Let us know if you need any specs to do the work and be careful not to damage the floats, diaphram needles or throttle plates.. I rebuild these carbs all the time and the internal parts are machined to very fine tolerances.. The pilot screw needles are so fine, they can actually punture your skin like a needle. Good luck...
 

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On the GL1100 carb #3 is the base, non adjustable carb. Is the GL1200 different in that respect?

Raymond
 

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Silicon Sam wrote:
On the GL1100 carb #3 is the base, non adjustable carb. Is the GL1200 different in that respect?
Raymond, yes, the 1200 uses the #4 carb as the master carb. It's just a linkage layout & which carb is the primary controlled carb.

Twisty
 

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"I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range"

:shock::shock::shock::shock:

I chicken out @ 75!!
 
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ubarw wrote:
"I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range"

:shock::shock::shock::shock:

I chicken out @ 75!!
Hey ubarw :whip: Slow down, before it's too late. :crying:

:whip::18red::whip:
 
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Hey johnmac :waving: Welcome to the best Goldwing forum on the net. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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ubarw wrote:
"I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range"

:shock::shock::shock::shock:

I chicken out @ 75!!
Mid 90 range:shock:??? I must be getting old:stumped:,,,,and the reason I am getting old is because I no longer do the mid 90 range. But that does not mean I never did....;)



:12red::cool:
 

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I would like to thank everyone for the advice. Sounds like I should set the carbs "by the book" to start with, then go from there, as needed.
 

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Redwing. wrote:
ubarw wrote:
"I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range"

:shock::shock::shock::shock:

I chicken out @ 75!!
Hey ubarw :whip: Slow down, before it's too late. :crying:

:whip::18red::whip:
NO! not me at 90!!?!?!? I was reacting to what Twisty said. I, ubarw, chicken out at 70-75. I have had it up to about 85 once, but thats it. No, not me. Really. I've got a lovely wife and two boys. I leave the risks to the boys...
 
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Gosh im pleased to read that ubarw. :clapper:
:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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ubarw wrote:
"I'm also a hard rider & regularly cruise in the mid 90 mph range"
90 kph suits me just fine! But setting the carbs by the book to start with is good thinking.
 
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