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I'm not a big fan of this and have never done it,

But we were having a discussion last night about the pros and cons of hauling along a couple of extra gallons of gas on a bike.

Obviously the the pro is you won't be stranded along side of the road, the cons, well...safety would be my biggest concern.



If you were going to do it how would you? What container? Where on the bike would you put it? Ect...
 

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Well, here is what I did.

I had a gl1200 with a very rusty tank and my only transportation. I put two 2 gallon plastic jerry cans in the left side saddle bag and left the top cover off the bike.

One jerry can was sealed tight, no leaks. The 2nd can I forced a rubber hose down through the cap's neoprene seal and down to the bottom. That hose went to the fuel pump. I popped the vacuum breaker cap (yellow on most jerry cans) and left it just barely touching, I never filled this can to the top, always about 2/3rds or so.

I never had a problem with leakage or fumes. Ran the bike that way for several months until I could get a good tank and replace it.

Would I do it again? Yes, I would carry a small jerry can IF it sealed perfectly tight and no fumes were detectable. But inside a sealed saddle bag? I don't think that would be smart. It is the vapor from gasoline that explodes, not the liquid, and a closed saddle bag could be a very dangerous thing.
 

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During last summer's gas shortage here in the southeast US, I put 2 rectangular Type 1 Safety Jerry cans in my trailer standing up. They seal and are designed to allow expansion within them rather than venting it out.
That gave me 10 extra gallons. I could have fit 3 more across the axle point inside the trailer easily. It adds a lot of weight but it's nice knowing the bombs are behind you in the trailer and not with you on the bike.

I never even smelled fumes when I opened the trailer lid and it was the dead of summer after a ride.

I didn't have any problems having to look for gas.
 

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Not using a trailer....that's cheating.

I know that iron butters have made auxilliary tanks fabricated to fit in the trunk or the bottoms of the bags, and that makes the most sense to me.
I have also seen a Valk with an aux. tank fabricated into a belly pan fitted up under the motor. for some reason, that just didn't seem wise to me either.

AZgl1500's stop gap solution worked and kept him riding, "any port in a storm" as I have been known to say.

But what we were talking about ishaving the extra gas some where on the bike "just in case". Would you consider one of those 2 gallon plastic gas jugs strapped onto the passenger floorboards (solo riding of course) a very safe option?
I sure wouldn't!!!


That's about as far as our discussion last night made it before the topic became very polarizing and we had to change the subject.
 

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No to using plastic strapped as you mentioned. Too easy to puncture.
 

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I've seen some pictures on the IBA site of some tanks custom made to sit on the passenger seat, but that eliminates a passenge when using it. I've thought about making one for my 1200 and long rides but have never got roundtuit.
 

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They are hard to find these days, but someone made some fuel pods that replaced the side covers on the GL1100. They may have had other models, but these are the only ones I've seen.
 

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I have a Vetter sidecar on my GL1200. Lots of Terraplane users add a second tank in the side car behind the seat. You could probably fit a ten gallon tank in there. I got the battery, helmets, rain gear, gloves, manual, maps, etc. in there now so I can't do it.

It would be nice tho. I only get about 120 miles between fill-ups. Mileage with the sidecar is about 27mpg. :(
 

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if you have a passenger, they can hold about 5 gallons worth of can in each hand. This way they can balance them on a knee when they get tired. If there is an accident, they just need to throw the cans as far as they can towards the car that probably caused it. The main drawback I see is that your wife might possibly end up with arms bigger than yours and then she might start pushing you around.
 

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You do not have to makeshift anything. Several companies do make explosive proof tanks that fit in the right side saddle bag.

Just do a search on your computer for something like Motorcycle gas tanks to fit saddlebags.

My bike holds enough gas, time it is at 200 miles I am ready for a break.

Kit
 

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Well, I suppose small containers of fuel could be lowered into the "Rocket Launcher" containers I have on the bike. Not sure I would recommend this however.

(Is it Blow Me Up Time yet)?:action: I need the pee stops any how.:cheeky1::cheeky1:

See the avatar.

Longboater,
 

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Believe me Kit,
I have no intention on makeshifting anything. In my first post, I stated that I am not a fan of this idea, and I really don't plan on changing my opinion on this subject.

The conversation we had was centered around strapping a plastic fuel container on the bike for emergency situations. On the luggage rack, on the floorboard, on one of those trailer hitch carriers, ect..

Like everyone else here, I have no desire of being covered in a flammible liquid while sliding down the road next to a 800lb. spark causing hunk of metal.
 

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Don't do it, not worth the risk!

Retired firefighter
 

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ivetaken a quart oil jug and filled it with gas going across the US.It aint much but never had to use it. JB
 

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norton wrote:
Believe me Kit,
I have no intention on makeshifting anything. In my first post, I stated that I am not a fan of this idea, and I really don't plan on changing my opinion on this subject.

The conversation we had was centered around strapping a plastic fuel container on the bike for emergency situations. On the luggage rack, on the floorboard, on one of those trailer hitch carriers, ect..

Like everyone else here, I have no desire of being covered in a flammible liquid while sliding down the road next to a 800lb. spark causing hunk of metal.
Well if it can be done on a motorcycle I have done it. I have strapped two gas cans across the back of a Honda Shadow before, just like saddlebags. Would not do it now, but back then, hey I really did not think about it.

One of my friends has a 4 gallon stainless steel round tank mounted on his luggage rack. He has it all painted up like a beer keg. It says Budweiser on it. It is on a Yamaha Venture.

Not sure how you would rig one up on a 1800. As the fuel pump is in the tank, pressure is quite high, so I suspect one would have to tap into the main tank and install a threaded fitting at some point.

As for carry of gas in a portable container, they do make safe explosive proof small containers also . They are filled with the wafer boards like you see in lawn mowers and the like that are supposed to prevent explosion or rupture in the case of an vehicle accident while the yard equipment is riding in a truck or trailer. Most small portable gas operated machines have this now.

None of the containers like we buy at walmart or somewhere and fill with gas and haul home are safe. But they do make those with the wafer board in them that are. Honey Comb would better describe it maybe.

Kit
 

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Back in the day when I rode enduro's in the Jack Pine woods of Michigan it was common practice for everyone to carry extra fuel on their bike one way or another. I have seen everything from a water bottle strapped to the cross bar of the handle bars to a Tide bottle bungied to the front number plate full of fuel.
My opinion is that if you really have a need to carry extra fuel that you will find a way, and if you have to ask, then you don't need it. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Big E wrote:
Back in the day when I rode enduro's in the Jack Pine woods of Michigan it was common practice for everyone to carry extra fuel on their bike one way or another. I have seen everything from a water bottle strapped to the cross bar of the handle bars to a Tide bottle bungied to the front number plate full of fuel.
My opinion is that if you really have a need to carry extra fuel that you will find a way, and if you have to ask, then you don't need it. Just my 2 cents.
The Michigan Jack Pine two day event for 250 miles each day for 500 miles. Gas oil and Gateraide got me through it. As for gas cans, I think the first red plastics were produced about that time. Too many years and brain cells ago. :D



Thanks for the memory.

Longboater,
 

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In my younger days, I did a lot of interstate trips. Running out of gas on the interstate once was all It took for me to find a way to carry an extra bit of fuel.

I started carrying a sprite bottle full of gas in a jacket pocket. Was just enough to get me to the next gas station. I used sprite bottles because they were made of the thickest plastic of any soda bottle. There are several soft drinks these days that use aluminum bottles. been thinking of using one for an auxilary fuel cell. Would be for a different application though. I keep threatening to set up a flame thrower exhaust on my Wing.
 

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A few years back we were traveling across Nevada on a 1400 Intruder. Best gas mileage, around 130 to 140 a tank, just remember the Intruder has a 3.3 gal tank. Had a friend with us on a 1800 Wing. I just bought a plastic1 gallon gas can and he carried it on the passengers floorboard and strapped it down with a bungie strap. Hey, I didn't have a choice. The route we took had one place that it was 165 miles to the next gas stop, so you do what you have to.

Cobra

:15grey:
 

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I have carried a 5 gallon plastic in my trailer before. I have been a little concerened about it. If you a buying one. Make sure the spout can stay inside of can when filled. Most new jugs state that spout must be out of jug when filled. I only fill it to about 4 1/2 gallons. And then seal in large heavy duty trash bag. I am going to build a new cooler rack for front of trailer. Making it large enough for the gas jug to sit outside. The reason the jug was inside of trailer was I got caught off gaurd last summer in Tennessee, no gas to be found in some places.
 
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