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Can any explain how this works and why the ball inside this liquid know just where to place themselves opposite the heavy part in the tire. The demo clearly shows that it works but I want to know the physics and property behind it's functionality before I go off and spend this type of money. If I'm viewing this correctly these beads have the ability to keep the tire in perfect balance as you wear the tire down. I just need to know how it works and why.


http://wingstuff.com/pgroup_detail/596_home_best_sellers/29204_stainless_centramatic_goldwing_wheel_balancers/?goto=%2Findex.php
 

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We have had some posts on this before, but I am still a bit hazy on how it works.
 

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I just went to the cetramatic site http://centramatic.com/Home.aspxand its quit interesting. I see these are used on a lot of machines and according to those who use them on GL-1800 there is no cupping. Wish I would have known this when the bike was new from day one. It may have saved me from having to buy $300 in tire in a few months. If these are this good then why don't the GL-1800 come from the factory with them installed. Anyone with first hand experince please chime in.
 

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inertia...

the balls obey physics and "stay in a steady state until acted upon by an outside force" -- in this case (as with Dynabeads) the heavy side of the tire/wheel assembly causes the assembly to essentially "pull away" from the rotational center... since the balls are obeying the law, the center moving away from them places them exactly opposite the direction of motion...

To try this at home- put a full glass of water on the dashboard of your car while sitting at a red light--- Smash the gas as the light goes green. You'll find that the glass of water remained quite motionless in its "steady state" (or tried to, there's frictions and stuff from the weight sitting on the dash) and that your lap has actually moved under the water's previous location... The water really didn't move as far as you did, so the car moving forward in a "relative sense" causes the glass and cup to relocate within the car to the opposite direction of the acceleration of the car.

The Centrimatic trick (if there is one) is to properly manage the masses (balls) in a reasonably frictionless environment to help them move freely (we always used mercury balancers fro rotational balancing like this, but apparently the mercury makes tuna-fish taste bad and kill people?)

When all of the forces are balances and the out-of-plane (across the axle / rotational center) motions stop the masses are kinda "held in place" to the outer surface of the balancer disk by forces from centripetal acceleration

To reach this uniform circular motion - the entire assembly (Cetrimatic AND the wheel/tire assy) are balanced (so weights are opposite the heavy bits) and everyone is happy.

Shake a maraca or baby's rattle someday -- you'll find the stuff inside hits the wall away from the direction of travel -- fluid balancers (balls, beads, mercury, or whatever) are just more sensitive
 

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Like satan say's the wieght of tha magnet is pulling the spot where it's attached away from the center of rotation and making the opposite side closer to the center of rotation so it colects the rolling balls. Is it worth $259 buck's I don't think so. Dyna beads work on the same principle and are located farther from the center of rotation so should work more efficantly and cost a whole lot less.
 

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I have looked at stuff like that, but never tried it. I have always replaced my own motorcycle tires (hundreds of them) and the part that takes the longest is balancing them. I use 2 jackstands, put the axle through the wheel, and lay one end of it on each jackstand. Once in a while I get lucky, and wind up with perfect balance to begin with. But most of the time I wind up taping weights on the rim, spinning the tire, and keep changing the amount and location of the weights until the tire/wheel never stops in the same place twice. Then I install the weights permanently. I have Ride-On in a couple of my tires, which is both a sealant, and is supposed to help balance the tire. But I did not put it in until I had a flat, and had to fix it with a plug. It is on the expensive side, though nothing like those things. I have 3 plugs in the ME880 on the back of my Vulcan 750 right now, and it is not even halfway worn out. But unless it is damaged to the point of being unsafe, I intend to wear it out.
 

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i have used them on tractor trailers and they are truly amazing





i have also heard of guys "attaching" hoola hoops to their tractor trailer tires, although i dont know how they would have accomplished this they swear it worked



i was talking to a tire company rep once and asked him about another "claim" that says you when changing tractor trailer tires one could just throw a few golf balls in the tire and it would ballance itself, he said the tire company had heard the same so they tried it, the balls became square with use and ate the liner of the tire away
 

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I have lately been putting a few onces of antifreeze in my tires, does the same thing for almost 0 cost.
 

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Good idea Dave..

And the principle does work... I've made this point before, it will only work for a system that can move (I called it flexible)... for example, a wheel spinning on a solid axle mounted in a concrete wall cannot move, so the balls cannot find the point to balance.. (same thing for a wheel balancing machine).. but an unbalanced wheel mounted on springs (or a flexible mount) will become "off centered" and the balls will correct that

I'll find that other "spirited" thread and link it H*E*R*E.. It has some other examples too... and the "nay" sayers get their comments in too..
 

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You are absolutely right, it will not work on a fixed axle. But physics applies, no matter what anyone says.
 

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nvrpc wrote:
Can any explain how this works and why the ball inside this liquid know just where to place themselves opposite the heavy part in the tire. The demo clearly shows that it works but I want to know the physics and property behind it's functionality before I go off and spend this type of money. If I'm viewing this correctly these beads have the ability to keep the tire in perfect balance as you wear the tire down. I just need to know how it works and why.


http://wingstuff.com/pgroup_detail/596_home_best_sellers/29204_stainless_centramatic_goldwing_wheel_balancers/?goto=%2Findex.php
The're smart balls.
 

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:claps:
 

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I don't know and really don't care how they work, all I know is that they do work. Been running them for almost 40,000 miles!:thumbsup:
 

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satan wrote:
inertia...

the balls obey physics and "stay in a steady state until acted upon by an outside force" -- in this case (as with Dynabeads) the heavy side of the tire/wheel assembly causes the assembly to essentially "pull away" from the rotational center... since the balls are obeying the law, the center moving away from them places them exactly opposite the direction of motion...

To try this at home- put a full glass of water on the dashboard of your car while sitting at a red light--- Smash the gas as the light goes green. You'll find that the glass of water remained quite motionless in its "steady state" (or tried to, there's frictions and stuff from the weight sitting on the dash) and that your lap has actually moved under the water's previous location... The water really didn't move as far as you did, so the car moving forward in a "relative sense" causes the glass and cup to relocate within the car to the opposite direction of the acceleration of the car.

The Centrimatic trick (if there is one) is to properly manage the masses (balls) in a reasonably frictionless environment to help them move freely (we always used mercury balancers fro rotational balancing like this, but apparently the mercury makes tuna-fish taste bad and kill people?)

When all of the forces are balances and the out-of-plane (across the axle / rotational center) motions stop the masses are kinda "held in place" to the outer surface of the balancer disk by forces from centripetal acceleration

To reach this uniform circular motion - the entire assembly (Cetrimatic AND the wheel/tire assy) are balanced (so weights are opposite the heavy bits) and everyone is happy.

Shake a maraca or baby's rattle someday -- you'll find the stuff inside hits the wall away from the direction of travel -- fluid balancers (balls, beads, mercury, or whatever) are just more sensitive
Thanks for the information. I can only assume from what I have read so far is these need to be taken off when one buys new tires, having the tire and rim balanced without the balls first.
 

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No Nvrpc...they ARE the balance. Mount the tire onto the wheel, then atach the centramatic device (or dyna beads) without first balancing the tire.
 

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if you put the centramatics on an old tire that was previously ballanced using whatever method you will need to remove the existing weights from the rim
 
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