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I'm about to change the clutch fluid on my 84 ASP. It hasen't been changed in about 5 years. The last time was at a dealer.My manual only covers adding fluid, but it doesn't seem to difficult a job to change all the fluid.

Has anybody had trouble bleeding the clutch after all the fluid has been removed?

Any comments or suggestions?

Thanks

Grant ( snowbound in the great Canadian Maritimes!! )
 

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In the same vein, how often should the clutch fluid be changed?

Thanks

Grant
 

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A tip picked up from keith cross of GWOCGB use a large Syringe with a bit of pipe attached to the end to suck the fluid though the bleed nipple rather than pumping it with the lever, just ensure you keep the Reservoir topped up and close the nipple as you would normaly, this tip works for brakes as well.

2 years is the norm for fluid changes

welsh winger
 

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welsh winger wrote:
A tip picked up from keith cross of GWOCGB use a large Syringe with a bit of pipe attached to the end to suck the fluid though the bleed nipple rather than pumping it with the lever, just ensure you keep the Reservoir topped up and close the nipple as you would normaly, this tip works for brakes as well.

2 years is the norm for fluid changes

welsh winger
I've seen that done, but you need to get someone to keep the clutch lever depressed all the while you are doing the syringe thing. Or you could just tie the lever back. It's a very clean way of changing the fluid.
 

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Thanks for the tips, it's really appreciated.

Newfiewinger
 

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Honda service manual shows the time / mileage intervals for brake fluid AND clutch fluid to be the same - 2 years or every 12,000 miles, whichever occurs first. Use DOT-4 fluid.

There are several methods of bleeding the brakes & clutch systems. I've done it by squeezing the levers and releasing the fitting, closing the fitting and releasing the levers or, you could purchase the pump type bleeders on the market that use a small tube inserted into the bleeder valve and squeezing a hand pump that actually pulls the fluid thru from the master cylinders. Cost about $6 US. They work very well and you stay clean. It's a simple procedure and if you need help, don't hesitate to ask for an assistant. It's really no different than bleeding the brakes on an automobile.. Just remember,,, No air bubbles in the system.. FYI, when bleeding the left front caliper, remember that it is connected to the rear master cylinder. Bleed that line from the rear brake resevoir also. E-mail me if you get stuck on anything.. Renegade
 

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On the '83 with the new braking system, the connected brake caliper with the back brake is the right front, not left. The left front is by itself with the front lever. I would seriously doubt they changedsides on the'84 but I could be wrong....

Also, some Speed Bleeders are worth the investment, as well as some stainless steel braided lines. The brake lines are 20+ years old after all.

Raymond
 

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There is a definite problem with clutch bleeding, its the lil air bubble that sticks at the fitting where it goes into the clutch master cylinder. If the handlebars and clutch cylinder are turned just the right angle, air will pocket there and the only way to remove it is to remove the master and point the lever straight up and pump it. Other than that, it isnt hard, just becareful to not get the fluid on the paint.
 

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What angle do you suggest for the handlebars.., I'm thinking full right. That raises the reservoir up the highest. Any suggestions?

As always, this is really appreciated!

Thanks

Grant
 

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Handlebar angle? I dont understand. If you mean to bleed the clutch, remove the clutch cylinder from the handlebars and then raise it, dont remove the handlebars. Yes, you can change the handlebar angle, but that should be based on how it feels to ride, not for the clutch cylinder.

If you do change the handlebar angle be CAREFUL to re tighten the clamps properly, there IS a wrong way to do it and it can cause accident if they come loose. It happened to me. Not fun.

If you do change the bars position, notice the upper caps have punch marks on the forward end, those punch marks MUST stay forward (to front of cycle) and when re-tightning the bolts, tighten the forward onesfirst, then pinch the clamps down by tightening the rear bolts.

Handlebar bolts for Interstate or Aspencade go 18 pound / feet or 25 Newton / meters. Different procedure for LTD/SEI
 

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OOPS.. sorry. Perhaps I should have phrased that better. What I meant to say was, if I turn the handlebars to the right, the reservoir for the clutch, on the handlebar,will be sitting a little higher, thus I would think a little less chance to have more air bubbles. OR am I out to lunch on this theory!

Remember, I'm snowbound and each day I longingly look at my wing and think of the summer that was and the summer that I hopewill be.......

Thanks

Grant
 

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I'm in the process of doing all that now. With 40 inches of snow on the ground there isn't much opportunity to ride!!

I spent a lot of time up near Mirimar in San Diego back in the eightys, flight training, but I never got to ride my bike there. I envy you peoply living where there is no snow!!

Thanks for all the help, it's greatly appreciated.

Grant
 

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Silicon Sam wrote:
On the '83 with the new braking system, the connected brake caliper with the back brake is the right front, not left. The left front is by itself with the front lever. I would seriously doubt they changedsides on the'84 but I could be wrong....

Raymond
I thought the linked fornt calliper on all the models was on the right?
 

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I tend to be one of the 'if it ain't broke don't fix it ' brigade. I have only changed the brake fluid once in over 20 years on my GL 1100 Cand that was whenpitted caliper pistons caused brake drag as the pitted pistons tore up the seals. For me its a case of if the brakes are still effective. Though its always best to follow the makers service intervals?

Stiggy
 

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Heffo, that's what my post said. The linked caliper is on the opposite side of the rear. The rear being on the left side of the bike, the front being on the right.

Brake fluid is cheap enough and cheap enough insurance to NOT change at least every two years, if not every year.

If you saw all the crap that came out my calipers when I tore them apart, you'd change it more often!

Raymond
 

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Sure its Third Party Only. Only problem I've had with brakes apart from having to replace the caliper pistons was down to pad replacement/glazing/fouling due to the stop start nature of Londons traffic. Easily cured with a wirebrush/file to rough up the padsand a petrol soaked rag to degrease everything.

Must thank you for your coolant advice re need for silicon free antifreeze as recently replaced mine after over 10 years of use and was unaware of the likely effect of the abrasive additive on old Honda water pumps. Cheers

Stiggy
 

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Oils don't last forever, and they lose the desired qualities that you need. Brake fluids will build up alot of crud, and the crud will aid in pitting of the piston. Engine oils will lose it's lube qualities and cause engine ware, fork oil is the same story. Final drives should also have new gear oil installed. A good cleaning of brake calipars and other parts is recomended as well, but might is not as important as frequent fluid changes.
 

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Stiggy wrote:
I tend to be one of the 'if it ain't broke don't fix it ' brigade. I have only changed the brake fluid once in over 20 years on my GL 1100 C and that was when pitted caliper pistons caused brake drag as the pitted pistons tore up the seals.
Good Lord! I change the brake fluid in my cars on an annual basis. When I played with sporty cars, I changed it before every excursion on the track. The previous owner of my Roadmonster didn't bother to change the brake fluid in the 10 years that he had it. The absorbed water caused the steel brake lines to rust from the inside out. I've recounted the tale of that hair-raising trip home in the rain when the brake line blew out elsewhere on this site.

Replace the brake fluid too, it's cheap maintenance.
 
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