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Very simple, just pull the pin and take them out. The hardest part as I remember was pushing the piston back into the caliper.
 

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Make sure the reservoir is not full, if it is take some of the fluid out being careful not to spill it on the plastic. Push in on the caliper to compress the pistons, remove the lower pin and the pads, install the outer pad and press the caliper in further until the inner one will go in, replace the pin, refill the reservoir and pump the lever, recheck the fluid level.

Also put a coat of moly paste on the edges of the metal ends of the pads and on the back where the pads contact the caliper.
 

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Thanks, I will go for it. I have put them on cars before so hopefully I won't have any problems.
 

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DaveO430 wrote:
Make sure the reservoir is not full, if it is take some of the fluid out being careful not to spill it on the plastic. Push in on the caliper to compress the pistons, remove the lower pin and the pads, install the outer pad and press the caliper in further until the inner one will go in, replace the pin, refill the reservoir and pump the lever, recheck the fluid level.
No, no, no.

The brake fluid down in the caliper is dirty and worn out from repeated heat cycles, and particulates and sludge are collected down there (at the lowest point in the system). Why would you want to push that contaminated brake fluid back up into the master cylinder, where it can clog the tiny return channel?

Put a small hose over the brake bleeder, and put the other end in a small cup or bucket (I use a small Rubbermaid container). Then open the bleeder just before you retract (push) the pistons in. It will be a lot easier to push the pistons, because you're just pushing the (dirty) fluid out the bleeder, instead of all the way up into the master cylinder, and through that tiny return hole. Once you've retracted the pistons, close the bleeder. You shouldn't have to bleed the brakes if you have the hose on it correctly, because it shouldn't let any air back into the system (but I would do it anyway, just as a part of normal brake maintenance).

When you're done replacing the pads and have pumped the brakes up to test them, check the brake level fluid in your master cylinder and top it up if needed.
 

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as a brake tech for a number of years on autos i fully agree with what GSMacLean said. it is the best way to reset the brake pistons. by doing it this way you don't have a chance of pushing the old dirty fuild back up into the master cly. and possible casusing a problem with the vent hole in the system getting filled with gunk and causeing the brakes to stick or drag as the heat builds up. also is a good idea to flush the brake fuild out with new when ever you are doing the brakes as it does need to be changed becasuse it collects water over time.
 

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I called the dealer about some pads and he ask how thick my pads were. I told him they were about 1/8 ins. thick and he said they aren't much thicker than that new and I still have a few miles left on them. What do you guys think?
 
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