Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Best looking member
Joined
·
3,110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I would like to get rid of the OEM rubber mount tire valves on my 1500. I have the solid aluminum ones. Was wondering if it is possible to change the valve without removing the wheel from the bike? And if so what is the best way to do it.

Thanks

Chuck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
948 Posts
I don't see why it can't be done. I change a lot of tires for myself and others. First you'll need to break the bead ( push the tire off of its seal on the rim). I'd rather remove the tire and use my wall mounted bead breaker, but people do it with a C clamp too. I am leary of the C clamp method because it must put a lot of force on a small area of the sidewall. Maybe the bead can be broken by using wooden blocks on each side with the C clamp, but it would have to be a big C clamp. Maybe wooden blocks with holes drilled and cut to accept the C clamp. Anyways, once the bead is broken you can cut off the rubber valve and install the aluminum one. Changing the valve stem will also change the tire balance. When reinflating the tire, care must be taken to be sure that the tire is fully back on the bead. this is done by inspecting the relationship of the rim and the molded line on the tire next to the rim. I understand why you'd want to do it yourself. The cost of having tires serviced and changed is outrageous now.

Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
948 Posts
To put a tire back on the bead I use water and dishsoap to lube the tire and rim, just enough without getting water into the tire, with a paint brush. The soap dries and turns to glue, really. I inflate the tire with 60 psi and alternately bounce the tire on the floor and beat the sidewall until the tire goes into place on the rim beads on both sides. Some tires are very stubborn. On the bike I guess you could inflate to 60 psi and beat with the rubber hammer if the tire doesn't seat right away. Sometimes the tire doesn't seat and the bead needs to be re-broken and started again.

Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,303 Posts
Any local shop should have a 'on the bike' bead breaker, however a large C-clamp will do the same thing. Once the bead is broken you can reach inside and change out the stem, just be very careful not to drop it down inside the tire. I like to keep an air hose attached to the stem the entire time I am working on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
I've done that before using rubber valve stems, but not all metal ones... I would think that you could do it, though it might be difficult to get the wrench inside as required to tighten the nut/s on the metal stem.

I think it would be easier to just remove the wheels and tires from the bike.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top